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Dr. Duane W. Wong, MD

Allergist and Immunologist

Dr. Duane W Wong MD is a top Allergist and Immunologist in Chandler, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. Duane W Wong MD is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. Duane W Wong MD is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. Duane W Wong MD is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Chandler, AZ, Dr. Duane W Wong MD is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
35 years Experience
Dr. Duane W. Wong, MD
  • Chandler, AZ
  • Northwestern Uniiversity
  • Accepting new patients

What are the best ways to deal with asthma in a child?

Hi, I'm sorry you're having so much difficulty with your son and his asthma. Your story is not unique; every year, I see so many children struggle with asthma during the school READ MORE
Hi,

I'm sorry you're having so much difficulty with your son and his asthma. Your story is not unique; every year, I see so many children struggle with asthma during the school year. Viral infections, air pollution, and allergies are among the most common triggers for asthma attacks. This can lead to missed days of school as well as missed activities, including sports and social events for the child as well as missed work days for the parents.

Unfortunately, there is no one size fits all solution for children with this problem. I would definitely urge you to seek out a pediatric allergist in your community who can help you identify and minimize the most prominent triggers for your child's asthma and partner with you to put together a treatment plan that will keep him as healthy as possible. The majority of parents I work with are interested in reducing the burden of asthma using the least amount of the safest medications possible. Best wishes on your journey to achieve and maintain the best possible health for your son!

What is the safe dose of cetrizine for kids around 5 years of age?

Hi, The usual recommended dose for a six-year-old is 1 teaspoon or 5 mL or 5 mg by mouth daily. I would usually recommend 4 mL or 4 mg in my 5-year-old patients. However, I READ MORE
Hi,

The usual recommended dose for a six-year-old is 1 teaspoon or 5 mL or 5 mg by mouth daily. I would usually recommend 4 mL or 4 mg in my 5-year-old patients. However, I would recommend checking with your child's pediatrician. There could be extenuating circumstances that would suggest a different dose. I hope your child (and the rest of the family) have a safe and enjoyable trip!

Why did I get rashes on my feet while walking on the grass? Could it be an allergy?

Hi, The rash on your feet that you experience while walking barefoot on grass could certainly suggest that you have a grass allergy. I would expect, additionally, that you READ MORE
Hi,

The rash on your feet that you experience while walking barefoot on grass could certainly suggest that you have a grass allergy. I would expect, additionally, that you would have some nasal congestion, runny nose, sneezing, and even some eye irritation during the grass pollination season in your area. Less commonly, we have seen patients with rashes on their feet after walking in grass that are sensitive to chemicals such as weed killers or fertilizer that are on the grass that you are walking on. A simple test by an allergist can help you determine the answer to this question.
Hope that helps!

I am lactose intolerant, does it mean my child will also have this condition?

Hi, Lactose intolerance is not a true allergy to cow milk protein, but it results from an inability to to digest lactose, the main sugar in cow milk. We see an increase in READ MORE
Hi,

Lactose intolerance is not a true allergy to cow milk protein, but it results from an inability to to digest lactose, the main sugar in cow milk. We see an increase in lactose intolerance in certain ethnic groups such as Asians, but the inheritance pattern is not well established. It is certainly possible for your child to develop lactose intolerance, but just because you are lactose intolerant does not guarantee that your child will have it. Fortunately, lactase, the enzyme that allows one to digest lactose (the sugar) is readily available and will allow you to digest lactase without too much difficulty and enjoy milk products.

Are antihistamines safe for consumption during pregnancy?

Hi, your question is an excellent one. If possible, I try to avoid prescribing medications during pregnancy because of the potential effect.

What could be the cause of the itching and bumps all over my body?

Hi, I'm sorry to hear that you're so uncomfortable! If the rash completely disappears after you take antihistamines, you likely have hives, or urticaria. If you've had the rash READ MORE
Hi,

I'm sorry to hear that you're so uncomfortable! If the rash completely disappears after you take antihistamines, you likely have hives, or urticaria. If you've had the rash for less than six weeks, it's called acute urticaria; if the rash keeps coming back for more than six weeks, it's called chronic urticaria. There is also a condition called dermographism, where the rash is linear rather than roundish. Mild physical trauma like scratching your skin will produce welts in the area of the skin that was irritated. Given that you've had the rash for six months, I would suggest you see an allergist for evaluation. In the meantime, a long-acting antihistamine like cetirizine might give you some temporary relief until you are seen. Please watch for sleepiness, as some patients become a bit drowsy on this medication.
I hope you feel better soon!

How effective are lactase enzyme tablets for children?

Hi! Lactose intolerance occurs when the body cannot breakdown lactose. Lactose is a complex sugar that is a component of milk and is distinct from milk protein. Lactose consists READ MORE
Hi! Lactose intolerance occurs when the body cannot breakdown lactose. Lactose is a complex sugar that is a component of milk and is distinct from milk protein. Lactose consists of two little sugars, glucose and galactose that are bonded together. When you drink milk, lactose travels into your stomach and then into your small intestine where you should make “lactase”, an enzyme, that cuts the bond between glucose and galactose. Now, these two little sugars are separate and small enough to be absorbed through the intestinal wall into the bloodstream and can be used for energy. Patients with lactose intolerance do not make any lactase or do not make enough lactase to cut the bonds of every lactose molecule that arrives in the small intestine. The lactose proceeds undigested or “uncut” into the large intestine where there are bacteria that normally live there. These bacteria are happy to see lactose arrive and ferment it. That leads to gas, abdominal pain, and often, diarrhea. Please note that this is NOT a milk protein allergy.

The treatment for lactose intolerance is either avoidance of milk products or drinking lactase-treated milk (Lactase milk that is now lactose free), or giving lactase tablets when the patient is about to consume dairy products. There should be no difference in efficacy between an adult or a pediatric patient, assuming the pediatric patient can swallow the caplet. Please note that the proper dose of lactase is very individual and will depend upon how much lactase one can produce and how much milk product is being consumed at that time. Some individuals require one caplet for 8 oz of milk; I’ve seen others that require 4 caplets for the same amount of milk. It could take a bit of experimenting to figure it out. Fortunately, it is difficult to overdose lactase; it’s just an enzyme. Hope that helps!

I found that I'm allergic to cats. Is it a lifelong allergy?

Hi, the history that you have described certainly suggests a cat allergy. Some people can outgrow this allergy, but it could take as long as 20-40 years to do so! There is hope, READ MORE
Hi, the history that you have described certainly suggests a cat allergy. Some people can outgrow this allergy, but it could take as long as 20-40 years to do so! There is hope, however, as allergen immunotherapy (allergy shots) has been shown to be helpful for animal lovers sensitive to cat, horse, and/or dog. I would recommend consulting an allergist for further information and treatment options if simply avoiding cats is not a good option for you.

Allergy

Hi, I'm sorry to hear that your reactions to milk seem to be increasing in severity. This is not rare; food allergy reactions can change with time and frequency of exposure. READ MORE
Hi,

I'm sorry to hear that your reactions to milk seem to be increasing in severity. This is not rare; food allergy reactions can change with time and frequency of exposure. There are people that outgrow their milk allergies, but others will have their milk allergy for their entire lives. In general, we recommend diagnostic testing to confirm the particular food allergy. After confirmation, our patients are advised to avoid the offending food allergen as well as to carry an antihistamine, such as Benadryl, as well as injectable epinephrine for accidental ingestions. There are food desensitization protocols being developed for patients that do not appear to be outgrowing their food allergies. I would suggest a consultation with an allergist for testing and a comprehensive treatment plan.

My daughter suddenly developed a rash after eating a new chocolate. What should I do?

Allergy to chocolate is actually quite uncommon, but she could certainly be sensitive to one the ingredients in the chocolate bar itself. It is also common to see rashes with viral READ MORE
Allergy to chocolate is actually quite uncommon, but she could certainly be sensitive to one the ingredients in the chocolate bar itself. It is also common to see rashes with viral infections, among other things. I recommend an evaluation by an allergist to help sort out these possibilities.

I have food allergy.Will this allergy persist for the rest of my life?

It is possible that your allergy could persist for the rest of your life; the response to foods is very individual. There are certain food allergies, such as milk, egg, wheat, READ MORE
It is possible that your allergy could persist for the rest of your life; the response to foods is very individual. There are certain food allergies, such as milk, egg, wheat, and soybean, that 80% of people outgrow, but for up to 20% of people, it could be a lifelong problem. Other foods, such as shellfish and nuts are only outgrown in approximately 20% of individuals. The research is focusing on desensitizing patients to food allergies that are not commonly outgrown. Most of the studies are focusing on a peanut allergy. I'm hoping we'll have good options for the general public in the next year or two.

How should I deal with my daughter's oral allergy to apples?

Hi, Your daughter could certainly have a true allergy to apple, but it is more likely that she has “oral allergy syndrome” (OAS). OAS occurs because pollen proteins can sometimes READ MORE
Hi,

Your daughter could certainly have a true allergy to apple, but it is more likely that she has “oral allergy syndrome” (OAS). OAS occurs because pollen proteins can sometimes cross-react with proteins found in raw fruits and vegetables. Most patients with oral allergy syndrome will have some pollen sensitivity and will only react to raw fruits and vegetables. Cooking or baking the fruit or vegetable, in question, usually removes the oral irritation. Please note that OAS is benign; unlike true food allergy, there is not generally thought to be a risk of anaphylaxis with oral allergy syndrome. An allergist can help your daughter differentiate between oral allergy syndrome and true food allergy. The patients that I see with oral allergy syndrome generally fall into two groups. One group will continue to eat foods in question because they really like the food and they are willing to put up with some oral discomfort. The second group of people are quite bothered by the oral irritation and will refuse to eat the food!

Strange allergy, what is it?

Hi, you most likely have oral allergy syndrome (OAS). This occurs because there can be cross-reactivity between pollen proteins and the proteins seen in raw fruits and vegetables. READ MORE
Hi, you most likely have oral allergy syndrome (OAS). This occurs because there can be cross-reactivity between pollen proteins and the proteins seen in raw fruits and vegetables. Cooking the food in questions seems to alter the protein structure enough so that your body no longer reacts to it. Not surprisingly, we see this reaction in patients with pollen allergy, so they often have concurrent nasal, ocular, or respiratory allergy symptoms. If you do have OAS, there should be no risk of anaphylaxis; the symptoms are just limited to the itching of the mouth and throat. Some of our patients will continue to eat the foods in question because they like the foods and can tolerate the itching. Others don=E2=80=99t like the oral discomfort and will avoid the raw fruits and vegetables that trigger these responses. Interestingly, many of our patients who undergo allergen immunotherapy (allergy injections) to desensitize themselves to environmental allergens find that when their sensitivity to pollens decreases, their OAS also diminishes. I would still recommend that you see an allergist who can help you differentiate between OAS and true food allergy, which carries a different risk level.

Duane Wong MD

Do allergies change?

Hi, Yes, allergies can change. There are certain food allergies, such as wheat, soybean, and egg, that 80% of patients outgrow by five years of age. Approximately 80% of patients READ MORE
Hi,

Yes, allergies can change. There are certain food allergies, such as wheat, soybean, and egg, that 80% of patients outgrow by five years of age. Approximately 80% of patients outgrow milk allergy by 10 years of age. Unfortunately, most people do not outgrow certain allergies, such as peanut, tree nut, fish, and shellfish. One can also develop certain food allergies during adulthood. The research seems to be focused on desensitization options for the people that do not outgrow their allergies. Most of the work is currently being done with peanuts, but it should expand to other food allergens with time.

I hope this was helpful!

Duane W. Wong, M.D.