expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Carl Fleisher, M.D.

Adolescent Psychiatrist

Dr. Carl Fleisher is a Child, Adolescent and Adult psychiatrist in Beverly Hills. Dr. Fleisher has a passion for helping people build happy, meaningful lives, and an unwavering commitment to his patients. Dr. Fleisher strives to embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when working with patients.

All answers posted by Dr. Fleisher are not a substitute for professional medical advice, as noted in the policies of Findatopdoc.com. Answers do not create a doctor-patient relationship, nor are they a solicitation to offer medical advice. Rather, the information and reference materials contained here are intended solely for the general information of the reader. It is not to be used for treatment purposes, but rather for discussion with the patient's own physician. The information presented here is not intended to diagnose health problems or to take the place of professional medical care. The information contained herein is neither intended to dictate what constitutes reasonable, appropriate or best care for any given health issue, nor is it intended to be used as a substitute for the independent judgment of a physician for any given health issue. Dr. Fleisher may answer medical questions solely on his own discretion. Dr. Fleisher does not have the resources or the capability to answer all visitor questions. In general, the questions that are answered are of value to other readers. The answers to these questions should in no way be considered specific medical advice or a plan for disease management.

The major limitation of informational resources like www.findatopdoc.com is the inability to take into account the unique circumstances that define the health issues of the patient. If you have persistent health problems or if you have further questions, please consult your health care provider. If you ignore these warnings and convey confidential information in a private message or comment, there is no duty to keep that information confidential. Seek the advice of a licensed physician in the appropriate jurisdiction before taking any action that may affect your health.  
11 years Experience
Dr. Carl Fleisher, M.D.
  • Beverly Hills, CA
  • Harvard Medical School
  • Accepting new patients

Can yoga help my son improve his concentration?

Yoga can have many benefits - for focus, for relaxation, for physical strength/health, for sleep, for personal meaning, for social connection, for self-care and self-confidence, READ MORE
Yoga can have many benefits - for focus, for relaxation, for physical strength/health, for sleep, for personal meaning, for social connection, for self-care and self-confidence, and more. People must usually be willing to participate in yoga to experience these benefits, of course. Difficulty concentrating may also be a sign of mental ill health for various reasons; hence, consultation with a licensed mental health professional may shed light on the problem as well.

NB: This does not constitute medical advice, please see the disclaimer in my Expert Blog for details.

Is my child having panic attacks?

All children and adults have healthy anxiety; some also have unhealthy anxiety. Unhealthy anxiety typically will not go away when parents provide reassurance, whereas healthy anxiety READ MORE
All children and adults have healthy anxiety; some also have unhealthy anxiety. Unhealthy anxiety typically will not go away when parents provide reassurance, whereas healthy anxiety will. Parents may not be equipped to manage unhealthy anxiety on their own. Rather, consultation with a licensed mental health professional could help provide a detailed plan of treatment.

NB: This does not constitute medical advice, please see the disclaimer in my Expert Blog for details.

Why doesn't my son want to make friends?

Children have two equally important "jobs": learn in school, and have fun with friends. Isolating, or simply preferring to be alone, may be concerning and more than a "phase" READ MORE
Children have two equally important "jobs": learn in school, and have fun with friends. Isolating, or simply preferring to be alone, may be concerning and more than a "phase" if it interferes with a child's function or his happiness. Certainly, social isolation lasting more than 2-3 months deserves inquiry. Children 12 or older may have developed enough self-awareness to tell a parent why they are not engaging socially. For example, children may be grieving, may anticipate being teased/bullied, may be depressed, may lack interest in social contact. If the explanation provided by the child is not reassuring or does not add up, consultation with a licensed mental health professional may help sort out what is going on.

NB: This does not constitute medical advice, please see the disclaimer in my Expert Blog for details.

Why is my child all of a sudden losing interest in his schoolwork?

Children may appear to lose interest, or focus, in schoolwork for many reasons. You could try asking the child, though unfortunately, children younger than 10 often have difficulty READ MORE
Children may appear to lose interest, or focus, in schoolwork for many reasons. You could try asking the child, though unfortunately, children younger than 10 often have difficulty explaining why their behavior is the way it is. They simply haven't developed the ability to observe and describe themselves. Sometimes events or major changes in family relationships - e.g. divorce, move, teacher on maternity leave - clearly link to a change in a child's behavior. Sometimes children have always had a particular difficulty (inattention, anxiety, etc.) that only become visible as schoolwork gets harder. Consultation with a licensed mental health professional may help distinguish among these or other potential causes.

NB: This does not constitute medical advice, please see the disclaimer in my Expert Blog for details.

My daughter is prone to hormonal depression. What can I do?

Mood changes in the days before (or during) menstruation are common. When girls first begin menstruating, it may take time for them to recognize their own mood changes, rather READ MORE
Mood changes in the days before (or during) menstruation are common. When girls first begin menstruating, it may take time for them to recognize their own mood changes, rather than blame family members for causing conflict. Once people recognize their vulnerability to over-reacting, they may be able to learn coping skills from many sources - family, friends, trusted adults from school or a religious organization, primary care provider, women's health websites, etc. Severe, impairing mood changes may lead families to seek evaluation by a licensed mental health professional. Such a person may determine that treatment is appropriate, either with medication (i.e. antidepressants), or psychotherapy. Alternatively, some girls/women may benefit from consultation with their local primary care provider or gynecologist. Either of those providers could evaluate whether an oral contraceptive pill might, on its own, limit mood swings.

NB: This does not constitute medical advice, please see the disclaimer in my Expert Blog for details.

Can I do anything to stop my child from wetting the bed?

Bedwetting that starts, or continues, after age 7 may be a sign of either urinary, other medical, or psychiatric problems. A pediatrician should first evaluate for urinary or other READ MORE
Bedwetting that starts, or continues, after age 7 may be a sign of either urinary, other medical, or psychiatric problems. A pediatrician should first evaluate for urinary or other medical problems. If those are absent, behavioral treatment and/or medication can be used. Behavioral treatment consists of 1) pre-bedtime water restriction, and 2) an alarm (sound + vibration) triggered by a moisture sensory - traditionally referred to as the "pad and bell" method. This is highly effective; cost varies. Medication makes the kidneys produce less urine overnight. Some causes of bedwetting may instead improve with psychotherapy.

NB: This does not constitute medical advice, please see the disclaimer in my Expert Blog for details.

My daughter is addicted to her phone. What can I do?

This is a complicated and now basically universal problem for parents. In the absence of inappropriate phone use (e.g., sexting), or any serious psychiatric illness, or problematic READ MORE
This is a complicated and now basically universal problem for parents. In the absence of inappropriate phone use (e.g., sexting), or any serious psychiatric illness, or problematic family conflict, often the first place to start is a discussion with the teenager in question. It is crucial for teenagers to connect with their peers, yet for the most part they still want to please their parents. Hence, teenagers may be able to participate in negotiating a compromise between needed socialization and appropriate limits of phone (or screen) use, especially if they hear that parents are in favor of social connection, in principle. Teenagers, like the rest of us, are more willing to take advice or follow commands from someone who is curious and will acknowledge their point of view (parents need not agree, or disagree, just listen and show understanding). Thus, it appears pertinent that you say you do not know who she is anymore. Consider getting to know her, assuming she will let you, before trying to change her phone use.

For further discussion of sexting, see the recent posts on my blog:
https://www.drcarlfleisher.com/single-post/2018/05/22/ChildMindorg---How-to-talk-to-your-kids-about-sexting

and

https://www.drcarlfleisher.com/single-post/2018/01/02/Sexting-the-other-side

NB: This post does not constitute medical advice, please see the disclaimer in my Expert Blog for details.