expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Sydney Ivana Thomson, MD

Anesthesiologist

Dr. Sydney Thomson is an anesthesiologist practicing in San Jose, CA. Dr. Thomson ensures the safety of patients who are about to undergo surgery. Anestesiologists specialize in general anesthesia, which will (put the patient to sleep), sedation, which will calm the patient or make him or her unaware of the situation, and regional anesthesia, which just numbs a specific part of the body. As an anesthesiologist, Dr. Thomson also might help manage pain after an operation.
33 years Experience
Dr. Sydney Ivana Thomson, MD
  • San Jose, CA
  • Creighton University School of Medicine
  • Accepting new patients

Is plavix( clopidogrel ) a blood thinner?

Plavix is an anti-platelet agent which decreases blood clot formation. Lay people will often call this a blood thinner.   DO NOT STOP taking plavix without discussing this with READ MORE
Plavix is an anti-platelet agent which decreases blood clot formation. Lay people will often call this a blood thinner.   DO NOT STOP taking plavix without discussing this with your cardiologist first. Since you had a heart attack,  you may have had a coronary stent placed.  These stents can close off (clot) if you suddenly stop plavix and cause another heart attack.  Your cardiologist may want to change you to a different "blood thinning" agent for surgery that can be easily reversed as a bridge until you can safely go back on plavix.  Since all blood thinners can increase the amount of bleeding during surgery, it is important that your orthopedic surgeon and cardiologist coordinate when to stop and start plavix in preparation for your surgery.  We have many patients who need anti platelet agents for a variety of medical issues and go on to  have successful surgery with appropriate medication management.  

What is procedural anesthesia?

Often referred to as "conscious sedation", procedural anesthesia involves administering sedatives, and other anesthetic agents with or without pain medications to induce a state READ MORE
Often referred to as "conscious sedation", procedural anesthesia involves administering sedatives, and other anesthetic agents with or without pain medications to induce a state that allows the patient to tolerate uncomfortable procedures such as colonoscopy or upper endoscopy while breathing on their own. You should still be able to follow commands even though most patients do not remember anything during the procedure. Anesthesia is a continuum and there may be times where these same medications are increased to induce periods of General Anesthesia (controlled unconsciousness) for parts of the procedure that become too uncomfortable to tolerate with conscious sedation. During these times an anesthesiologist may need to support your airway/breathing or give medications to support your blood pressure. Surgical anesthesia can involve conscious sedation with regional anesthesia such as an epidural or spinal injection, a peripheral nerve block or local anesthetic injected in the surgical field. General Anesthesia can also be used for surgical procedures with or without regional anesthetic techniques. Your Anesthesiology professional should discuss your anesthetic options and answer any questions or concerns before any medications are administered. I hope that helps.