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Dr. Patrick D. Mccarty, DDS

Anesthesiologist

Dr. Patrick D. Mccarty DDS is a top Anesthesiologist in Brighton, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. Patrick D. Mccarty DDS is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. Patrick D. Mccarty DDS is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. Patrick D. Mccarty DDS is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Brighton, MA, Dr. Patrick D. Mccarty DDS is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
Dr. Patrick D. Mccarty, DDS
  • Brighton, MA
  • Accepting new patients

Why is my son hyper after anesthesia?

Well, while unsure of the child’s age and duration of recovery from anesthesia, it could be anything from some residual disinhibition due to early stage recovery or being somewhat READ MORE
Well, while unsure of the child’s age and duration of recovery from anesthesia, it could be anything from some residual disinhibition due to early stage recovery or being somewhat overly tired from a long day. Many kids have a brief run of excitement before falling asleep for the night under normal circumstances. Lastly, I would consider if he's on a bit of a “sugar high” from any post-op foods he has received at home. Honestly, I would not worry about it considering other common post-anesthesia reactions can involve nausea, fever, or being lethargic. A little hyperactivity seems like a nice alternative, no?

Is high blood pressure bad for anesthesia?

Hypertension can be treated intraoperatively — as a patient you should assure you are compliant with medications based on your doctor’s suggestions, get some rest in the coming READ MORE
Hypertension can be treated intraoperatively — as a patient you should assure you are compliant with medications based on your doctor’s suggestions, get some rest in the coming days and try not to worry — post surgery remember that efforts made to improve your health will put you in a better situation in event you are in need of future anesthesia related procedures

How are children usually given anesthesia?

Hi, There are a few methods of inducing anesthesia: 1) Intravenous medications 2) Inhalational anesthetic gas 3) Intramuscular injection All three of these methods can READ MORE
Hi,

There are a few methods of inducing anesthesia:

1) Intravenous medications
2) Inhalational anesthetic gas
3) Intramuscular injection

All three of these methods can be preceded by oral medication used to relax a child and create an amnestic effect. However, this requires the cooperation of a child in ingesting such medication which is typically a liquid with a somewhat bitter taste. An alternative delivery is through a mist directed up a nostril and absorbed through mucosa, but the downside is a brief burning sensation that can be upsetting to a child.

In the appropriate situation, many providers will utilize a mask induction w/ an anesthetic has called sevoflurane. It does have a strong odor that can be described to a child as similar to nail polish, wet paint or even stinky feet (kids tend to laugh at that last one quelling the anxiety). This method requires roughly 10 deep breaths into a mask (you can expect amnesia after the 3rd/4th breath). It does not smell horrible but does not smell like roses either. This results in no “shots” while the child is still awake as IV insertion occurs after they are “asleep.”

An intramuscular injection is typically the least desirable method but utilized for a patient who can not tolerate any cooperation or is at risk of hurting themselves or someone involved in their care. It is quickly effective and renders a child “asleep” in 3-5 minutes.

Alternatively, a local anesthetic cream (“EMLA cream”) can be applied to a prospective IV site prior to insertion making the site numb and pain free to the needle.

Best of luck - and remember the surgery/anesthesia process is always worse for the parent than the child as anticipation is the hardest aspect. Do everything you can to help your child realize there is nothing to be afraid of and do your best not to show to much of your own anxiety as they look to you for how they should react to an unknown situation like surgery.

Best regards,

Patrick

Is it to get anesthesia with a fever?

Considering the surgery will remove the source of your infection and subsequent fever ... yes it is safe ... good luck and I hope you recover well

Why was my son given anesthesia for a CT scan?

Excessive movement during the scanning may cause blurred images. Also at times your son may be asked to hold his breath and stay quite still while each scan is taken. Patients READ MORE
Excessive movement during the scanning may cause blurred images. Also at times your son may be asked to hold his breath and stay quite still while each scan is taken. Patients who have difficulty lying still or feel anxious or claustrophobic are often administered sedation and/or anesthesia to allow for these requirements to occur. It is probably unreasonable to ask a 3 year old to tolerate the procedure otherwise. It will be harder on you as a parent than on your child. Inherent risk of anesthesia in a healthy patient is less than your son being a passenger in a vehicle on the highway. In perspective of day to day life, the risk is appropriate for the benefit.

What could be the symptoms of an anesthesia overdose? Is it possible?

The surgeon would not be acutely aware which is why an anesthesiologist and/or CRNA are present throughout the procedure to administer, monitor and intervene if need be with critical READ MORE
The surgeon would not be acutely aware which is why an anesthesiologist and/or CRNA are present throughout the procedure to administer, monitor and intervene if need be with critical care.

Am I really paralyzed under general anesthesia?

For many general anesthetics yes you are - although the appropriate term of being administered "muscle relaxants" to prevent voluntary muscle movement is much less worrisome to READ MORE
For many general anesthetics yes you are - although the appropriate term of being administered "muscle relaxants" to prevent voluntary muscle movement is much less worrisome to hear right? Often a patient is paralyzed during the intubation (or placement of a breathing tube). Muscle relaxants further aid in allowing retraction of tissue such as muscles, organs etc to allow access to the surgical site. Patients are also paralyzed to allow for mechanical ventilation from a ventilator. You are monitored and these medications are reversible when the appropriate time occurs.

Is it safe for an 86 year old to go under anesthesia?

Anesthesia itself carries inherent risk. In addition, comorbidities of a given patient increase risk. While age alone may not be a concern, associated age degeneration of organ READ MORE
Anesthesia itself carries inherent risk. In addition, comorbidities of a given patient increase risk. While age alone may not be a concern, associated age degeneration of organ systems would influence risk of anesthesia. For any patient, the necessity of a given surgical procedure and the health of the individual patient dictates whether inherent risks of anesthesia are justified.
Best wishes for your mother’s recovery.

Take care.