expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Paul S. Issack, M.D.

Orthopedic Surgeon (Orthopedist)

Adult Joint Reconstructive Surgery
Hip and Knee Replacements
Trauma and Fracture Surgery
Pelvic and Acetabular Surgery
Spinal Surgery
21 years Experience
Dr. Paul S. Issack, M.D.
Specializes in:
  • Joint Replacement
  • New York, NY
  • New York Univ Sch of Med, New York Ny
  • Accepting new patients

partial vs full joint replacement

In a partial hip replacement (hemiarthroplasty), the acetabulum (hip socket) is not changed. A stem with a femoral head (ball) is placed in the femur and the acetabulum is left READ MORE
In a partial hip replacement (hemiarthroplasty), the acetabulum (hip socket) is not changed. A stem with a femoral head (ball) is placed in the femur and the acetabulum is left alone. This operation is generally done for a type of hip fracture (femoral neck fracture) in very elderly or frail patients who are unable to tolerate a total hip replacement.

A total hip replacement involves in addition to the above, replacing the socket with a metal implant. This provides better pain relief than a partial hip replacement. This is the standard of care for patients who are undergoing hip replacement for arthritis, and also the treatment of choice for femoral neck fractures, in most patients who are able to tolerate the surgery (with the exception being very young patients who sustain a femoral neck fracture).

If a partial hip replacement is performed in a relatively healthy active patient to treat hip arthritis, the patient is likely to return within a year or so with worsening of the arthritis in the acetabulum. That may require additional surgery to convert the partial to a total hip replacement.