expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Lee A Wittenberg, DPM

Podiatrist (Foot and Ankle Specialist)

Dr. Lee Wittenberg is a 3 year surgically trained Podiatrist. Dr. Wittenberg is trained in all elements of foot and ankle surgery, wound care and limb salvage, and general Podiatric medicine. Dr. Lee Wittenberg is Board Certified by the American Board of Lower Extremity Surgery, as well as the American Board of Foot & Ankle Surgeons. Whether you need clinical treatment with orthotics, Diabetic shoes and insoles, or bracing of the foot and ankle for pathologies such as Drop Foot, Flat Foot reconstructions, care of an injury or fracture, or an ankle sprain, you can find the care you need at Apache Foot & Ankle Specialists. Dr. Wittenberg is also a wound care and limb salvage expert. If you have a long-standing or non-healing wound, Diabetes, or other Dermatologic issues, Apache Foot & Ankle Specialists can help you in those areas. Dr. Wittenberg is kind, compassionate, and ethical, and will always be looking out for the patients' best interests.
21 years Experience
Dr. Lee A. Wittenberg, DPM
Specializes in:
  • Foot Injuries and Disorders
  • Las Vegas, NV
  • Ohio College of Podiatric Medcine
  • Accepting new patients

How do you get rid of ankle pain after surgery?

What type of surgery did you have? When did you have surgery? Why is your surgeon not available for you to discuss your post-operative course? It is impossible to answer your READ MORE
What type of surgery did you have? When did you have surgery? Why is your surgeon not available for you to discuss your post-operative course? It is impossible to answer your question without details about what has happened. I highly suggest if you are having issues after surgery, you should speak with the surgeon who performed the surgery. If he/she is unwilling to visit with you and answer your questions, physicially go to see someone for a second opinion.

When should you see an orthopedist for foot pain?

You should see a Podiatrist who has at least 2 years of surgical residency training and is board certified in foot surgery and in reconstructive ankle and rearfoot surgery; you READ MORE
You should see a Podiatrist who has at least 2 years of surgical residency training and is board certified in foot surgery and in reconstructive ankle and rearfoot surgery; you should never see an orthopedist for foot and ankle problems, as they do not receive enough training in the pathologies or biomechanics of the foot and ankle. But you should see someone if the pain is interfering in your lifestyle/quality of life/activity level.

Sprained ankle?

The white areas you are seeing with the ‘spike or hump’ is what we call an effusion (excess fluid) inside the ankle joint. Effusions come with injury/trauma and are a sign of READ MORE
The white areas you are seeing with the ‘spike or hump’ is what we call an effusion (excess fluid) inside the ankle joint. Effusions come with injury/trauma and are a sign of swelling after a recent injury. The shape of the spike is just the way the fluid is showing up inside-there is no physical spike or hump there.

Foot pain?

The most likely answer is there may be ‘neuropathy’ in your feet. Neuropathy means the nerves have changed their conduction and are sending ‘strange’ information or signals to READ MORE
The most likely answer is there may be ‘neuropathy’ in your feet. Neuropathy means the nerves have changed their conduction and are sending ‘strange’ information or signals to your brain. In some cases, neuropathy burns, sometimes people say things like you’re saying, others complain of paresthesias, such as a feeling of bugs crawling on them, numbness, tingling and the problem is worse at night when you’re actually resting or in bed, and sometimes wakes you from sleep or stops you from getting to sleep. The best way to find out is to visit a podiatrist who can order a nerve conduction study through a referral to a neurologist. Alternatively, you may have tendinitis or arthritis, but to me, it sounds like neuropathy.

Does a podiatrist take care of foot deformities?

Of course a Podiatrist takes care of foot deformities. But there are differences in the training of Podiatrists, and you should look for a well-trained Podiatrist who had a 3-year READ MORE
Of course a Podiatrist takes care of foot deformities. But there are differences in the training of Podiatrists, and you should look for a well-trained Podiatrist who had a 3-year surgical residency training, or a Podiatrist who had a 2-year surgical residency training plus a fellowship in reconstructive surgical procedures, as well as board certification in Foot and Ankle surgery in order to be properly taken care of. You can find the training levels of the Podiatrists in your area by contacting the Board of Podiatry in your particular state to find out who is board certified in foot and ankle surgery, and what type of residency training the Podiatrists in your area had. Do your research-we are NOT all created equal!

What is the latest treatment for sports related foot pain?

This question is too broad and vague to give an answer. It really is dependent on what type of injury/pain you are experiencing and in what part of the foot the pain is located. READ MORE
This question is too broad and vague to give an answer. It really is dependent on what type of injury/pain you are experiencing and in what part of the foot the pain is located. There are 26 (+2) bones, 30 joints, and over 100 muscles, tendons, and ligaments in the foot and ankle. There are many nerves and blood vessels in the foot and ankle. So, there are many different things that may go wrong or may cause pain, and there does not necessarily have to be a sports-related injury to have foot and ankle pain.

Can Haglund's deformity be cured without surgery?

Haglund's deformity can not be 'cured' without surgery. It is a structural/boney problem, and will not go away on its own. However, there are things that can be done to alleviate READ MORE
Haglund's deformity can not be 'cured' without surgery. It is a structural/boney problem, and will not go away on its own. However, there are things that can be done to alleviate pain from the problem, and if they work, you do not need surgical intervention to handle the pain from the problem. Wearing shoes that are backless (mule type shoes) or wearing shoes that do not press against the Achilles tendon and the posterior heel too tightly may alleviate the symptoms. Believe it or not, high heels (even 2" heels) will tilt the Calcaneus forward, alleviating pressure off the Achilles, which is usually the cause of the pain (the calcaneal bone pressing against the Achilles and the pressure from the shoes impinging the tendon against the heel bone). Also, there is something you can buy called a Silipos Achilles Tendon Sleeve, which is like an ACE ankle brace with a piece of silicone that alleviates pressure from the shoes against the Achilles tendon.

Leg and foot pain?

"Traveling" pain is very difficult to diagnose without seeing the patient in person. In fact, it is difficult even when there is a person-to-person appointment. It is very difficult READ MORE
"Traveling" pain is very difficult to diagnose without seeing the patient in person. In fact, it is difficult even when there is a person-to-person appointment. It is very difficult to isolate one diagnosis when the pain is in so many different locations. Cramping and Spasms can be related to electrolyte imbalances, neurologic conditions, sprains/strains/contusions, neuro-muscular issues that globally affect the body, autoimmune disease, blood clots, and many other things. For this particular question, I am going to highly recommend you see someone in person for a proper evaluation and treatment.

Weird spot on the sole of my foot?

Just based on the surrounding tissue (I don't know if you can see the halo of yellow/brown coloration around the lesion with a darker line similar to the lesion extending several READ MORE
Just based on the surrounding tissue (I don't know if you can see the halo of yellow/brown coloration around the lesion with a darker line similar to the lesion extending several cm beyond the central lesion of concern), but I would guess you somehow bruised the area and have a small hematoma (bleeding under the skin in the area). BUT, I would watch the lesion closely. If it gets bigger or if it becomes more raised, if it becomes more painful, or if it simply does not go away within a month or so, I would have the lesion checked out and even possibly biopsied. You can either seek out a good Podiatrist or you can see a dermatologist for this issue.

How long does it take to recover from ankle surgery?

It depends on what type of surgery you are having. An Achilles tendon repair (takes about 3 months to heal) takes longer to heal than an ankle fracture (takes about 6-8 weeks READ MORE
It depends on what type of surgery you are having. An Achilles tendon repair (takes about 3 months to heal) takes longer to heal than an ankle fracture (takes about 6-8 weeks to heal). An exostectomy/resection of extra bone/removal of a Haglund's deformity at the heel does not take long to heal, in the grand scheme of foot and ankle surgery (about 2.5-3 weeks for healing). A lateral ankle stabilization procedure to strengthen the ankle ligaments can take 2-3 months to heal. An ankle arthroscopy only takes about 1 month to heal. A repair of an osteochondral defect may take several months to heal. It all depends on what the pathology is and what the proposed surgery is.

What does a pinched nerve in the foot feel like?

A pinched nerve may feel different to different people. Most 'pinched nerves' in the feet are around the ball of the foot and are referred to as Neuromas. A neuroma may cause READ MORE
A pinched nerve may feel different to different people. Most 'pinched nerves' in the feet are around the ball of the foot and are referred to as Neuromas. A neuroma may cause pain at the ball of the foot which may be aching or burning in nature, and may radiate pain or a feeling of tingling or numbness into the toes. There are many other neurologic problems that can affect the feet, but this problem is what people are usually referring to when they talk about 'pinched nerves' in the foot.

Do orthopedic doctors treat ankle sprains?

There are Orthopedic doctors who specialize in the pathology of the foot and ankle. But in all honesty, a well-trained Podiatrist is who you should see for foot and/or ankle pain. READ MORE
There are Orthopedic doctors who specialize in the pathology of the foot and ankle. But in all honesty, a well-trained Podiatrist is who you should see for foot and/or ankle pain. A Podiatrist is trained in all areas of medicine, just as an orthopedic surgeon or any other medical physician. However, an Orthopedic surgeon that specializes in the foot and ankle only has 6 months to 1 year fellowship after medical school in the pathology and treatment of the foot and ankle. A Podiatrist is trained from day one of school in pathologies of the foot and ankle, and Podiatrists do between 2-4 year residencies after medical school where the entire focus of the education and training is on pathology of the foot and ankle. We are far more well-versed in conservative as well as surgical care of the foot and ankle.

How long should I wear an ankle brace after a fracture?

If you have a true ankle fracture, or any true fracture, it takes 6-8 weeks for a healthy person to heal without complications. At that time, the bone is technically at physiologic READ MORE
If you have a true ankle fracture, or any true fracture, it takes 6-8 weeks for a healthy person to heal without complications. At that time, the bone is technically at physiologic strength. BUT, if you have a true ankle fracture, immobilization needs to be better than an ankle brace. A person should be immobilized in a cast, splint, or walking boot for a minimum of 5-6 weeks after a fracture. Sometimes longer if there are complications with healing. An ankle brace can be used after 6-8 weeks of immobilization, but should not be used as the primary treatment.

How do they fix bunions with flat feet?

Bunions and flat feet, though related, are generally separate conditions, and are not always corrected 'together.' But fixing a bunion with or without flat feet is similar. If READ MORE
Bunions and flat feet, though related, are generally separate conditions, and are not always corrected 'together.' But fixing a bunion with or without flat feet is similar. If the flat foot is to be fixed at the same time, there are many considerations your surgeon will evaluate and that will determine the types of necessary procedures to correct the deformity.

Why do I need to keep my foot elevated after surgery?

After any injury (surgery is basically a controlled injury), you will experience a great deal of swelling. Too much swelling can be detrimental to the outcome of the surgery, READ MORE
After any injury (surgery is basically a controlled injury), you will experience a great deal of swelling. Too much swelling can be detrimental to the outcome of the surgery, and can cause other issues with healing. Elevating helps to keep the swelling down, and helps with pain control. When you elevate, you should be elevating your extremity above the level of your chest, if possible, for the first 72 hours to 1 wk after surgery, then it is ok to elevate a little bit lower than your chest. Blood, like any fluid, flows 'downstream.' So elevating above the level of your heart makes the blood have to travel 'upstream,' decreasing the amount of swelling

How do you get rid of a ganglion cyst on your foot?

In my practice, the first course of action for a Ganglion cyst is to aspirate the synovial fluid out of the cyst under local anesthesia, and the to inject the cyst with cortisone. READ MORE
In my practice, the first course of action for a Ganglion cyst is to aspirate the synovial fluid out of the cyst under local anesthesia, and the to inject the cyst with cortisone. I then have the patient wear a compression bandage around the area for about 1 month. If the cyst returns, I give the patient the option of re-doing the aspiration and injection. If the patient does not want to do this, or if I do a second injection/aspiration and the ganglion still comes back, I suggest surgical excision of the Ganglion cyst. The recovery after surgery is about 3 weeks before you can get back into a normal shoe.

When should I be concerned about heel pain?

If your heel pain is inhibiting you from participating in any of the activities you are wanting to participate in, then you should seek medical attention for your problem. If READ MORE
If your heel pain is inhibiting you from participating in any of the activities you are wanting to participate in, then you should seek medical attention for your problem. If the pain is bothering you on a consistent basis, you may want to have your problem evaluated. If you are functioning fine, the pain is not very frequent (maybe once every few days and not every day) and you are participating in all activity with no problems, then you may be fine and may not need any medical attention. Pain is never normal.

How long does it take to recover from a dislocated ankle?

It depends on what damage exactly was done during this dislocation. Were bones broken and needed surgical repair? Were ligaments torn? Do they require repair? Were tendons READ MORE
It depends on what damage exactly was done during this dislocation. Were bones broken and needed surgical repair? Were ligaments torn? Do they require repair? Were tendons torn? Were any of the medial ankle ligaments torn or sprained? Basically, you may require one healing time of 3-6 months, depending on how the ankle needed to be repaired. If you did not have a surgical repair, and the ankle was simply relocated, it is highly likely you will have long-standing issues that may or may not require surgical attention down the line. The minimum evaluation you will require is an MRI to visualize the tendons and ligaments which might be damaged or affected by the dislocation. Furthermore, a minimum of 1-3 months in a cast or walking boot should have been initiated at the time of injury.

Burning sensation?

Burning is usually an indication of a nerve-related problem. There are many causes of nerve related pain, including problems with the lower back/spine/spinal cord, autoimmune READ MORE
Burning is usually an indication of a nerve-related problem. There are many causes of nerve related pain, including problems with the lower back/spine/spinal cord, autoimmune disease, Diabetes, Trauma, Surgery, Vitamin deficiencies, nerve entrapments, viruses, tumors, and many other things. If this problem has been present for more than a month, and/or is getting more painful/problematic, it would be of benefit for you to see a foot and ankle specialist, and/or a neurologist. There is a test called a Nerve Conduction Velocity/Electro Myograph study which will diagnose exactly what type of problem you are having with your nerves (but my still not actually give you the cause of the problem-sometimes can/sometimes does not).

How do you reduce swelling after ankle dislocation?

Any time you have an injury, the first steps are RICE therapy (Rest Ice Compression and Elevation). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication may be used for pain and swelling. READ MORE
Any time you have an injury, the first steps are RICE therapy (Rest Ice Compression and Elevation). Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication may be used for pain and swelling. Steroids may be used in some cases. But you may require an MRI to evaluate the tendons and ligaments surrounding the ankle joint to insure they are not torn or permanently damaged in some way, which may require surgical intervention to repair.