expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Jason E. Garber, M.D.

Neurosurgeon

Dr. Jason E Garber M.D. is a top Neurosurgeon in Las Vegas, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. Jason E Garber M.D. is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. Jason E Garber M.D. is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. Jason E Garber M.D. is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Las Vegas, NV, Dr. Jason E Garber M.D. is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
24 years Experience
Dr. Jason E. Garber, M.D.
  • Las Vegas, NV
  • Univ of Tx Med Sch At San Antonio, San Antonio Tx
  • Accepting new patients

Can a back injury cause neurological defects?

A spinal injury can certainly cause neurologic deficits. If you are having symptoms in your arms and legs, there may be a problem in your cervical spine. If your symptoms are only READ MORE
A spinal injury can certainly cause neurologic deficits. If you are having symptoms in your arms and legs, there may be a problem in your cervical spine. If your symptoms are only in the legs, you may have a problem more likely in your lower lumbar spine, or less commonly in your thoracic spine.

If your symptoms have persisted since your accident three months ago, I would recommend seeing your primary care physician and possibly being referred to a neurological surgeon. You may require MRI imaging and plain film X-rays to further evaluate your spinal condition.

Sincerely,

Jason E. Garber, MD, FAANS, FACS

Can a blood clot in the brain be removed by medicines alone?

A 13-year-old that has developed an intracranial hemorrhage, or blood clot, needs to be evaluated for causation. The concern I have for a 13-year-old with an intracranial hemorrhage, READ MORE
A 13-year-old that has developed an intracranial hemorrhage, or blood clot, needs to be evaluated for causation. The concern I have for a 13-year-old with an intracranial hemorrhage, or blood clot, would be arteriovenous malformation, or possibly a neoplasm. Other considerations may be moyamoya disease. Other vasculitis disorders may also cause intracranial hemorrhage.

The child needs to be worked up with MRI imaging with and without gadolinium, as well as four vessel angiography, or CT/angiography.

With respect to an idiopathic, or Unknown cause of intracranial hemorrhage, the clot usually resolves over time without surgical intervention if there is no greater than 4 mm of midline shift and if the patient is without frank neurologic deficit.

If there is alteration of mental status, or a neurologic deficit is present, then a neurosurgeon may consider evacuating the clot, after it has been worked up to determine the origin or ideology.

Thank you very much for your time

Sincerely,

Jason Garber, M.D., FACS.