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Dr. Mary Beth Scott-calor, D.O.

Anesthesiologist

Dr. Mary Beth Scott-calor D.O. is a top Anesthesiologist in Prestonsburg, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. Mary Beth Scott-calor D.O. is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. Mary Beth Scott-calor D.O. is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. Mary Beth Scott-calor D.O. is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Prestonsburg, KY, Dr. Mary Beth Scott-calor D.O. is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
Dr. Mary Beth Scott-calor, D.O.
  • Prestonsburg, KY
  • West Virginia School Of Osteopathic Med
  • Accepting new patients

Is back pain possible after an epidural?

The fact that your body just went through an major change. Your posture has gone from a hyper lordotic (low back is more inward and belly is protuberant) to more of your "unpregnant READ MORE
The fact that your body just went through an major change. Your posture has gone from a hyper lordotic (low back is more inward and belly is protuberant) to more of your "unpregnant posture" is one reason for back pain. Your muscles and ligament have stretched over 9 months and in one day you are now no longer in that position. One of the most dramatic changes in such a short period of time is right before birth and after birth. The other that comes to my mind, is when you do have an epidural performed, it depends on how traumatic it was for your low back, such as number of punctures it took the provider to successfully place the epidural. Usually there is soreness involved and a "bruised" type feeling that is located at the spot you had your epidural, and that will go away in time. If you ever feel like your pain is increasing instead of getting better always check with your obstetrician.

Why do I have dry mouth after the anesthesia?

Yes, the insensible losses of fluids, (such as from the respiratory system and skin). You may behind in your fluids. If the brain is working properly, thirst is a good indicator READ MORE
Yes, the insensible losses of fluids, (such as from the respiratory system and skin). You may behind in your fluids. If the brain is working properly, thirst is a good indicator of being behind in your fluids.

Is my fever a side effect of anesthesia?

A fever could be a sign of an infection, if you don't have any specific area of symptoms, such as your throat being sore, you should have your throat ears, lungs and urinary READ MORE
A fever could be a sign of an infection, if you don't have any specific area of symptoms, such as your throat being sore, you should have your throat ears, lungs and urinary tract checked in that they are common sources of infection.
However, there is a specific uncommon reaction from certain types of anesthetics, this condition is usually hereditary and can be lethal. It is called Malignant Hyperthermia. It is a condition that is triggered by usually Succinylcholine (Paralytic agent) and/or volatile anesthetics such as the gases.

Should blood thinnners be stopped before a surgery?

Yes, absolutely. But you should have guidance from your provider who placed you on the blood thinning agent. Some of the anticoagulant "blood thinners" medications have different READ MORE
Yes, absolutely. But you should have guidance from your provider who placed you on the blood thinning agent. Some of the anticoagulant "blood thinners" medications have different half lives. Which mean some last longer in the blood than others. You should also have a consultation with your anesthesiologist to make sure they are aware of your status and the condition for which you had to be placed on anticoagulants.

Is it risky for children to go under anesthesia?

It is always a risk to undergo any procedure, however with the monitors and medications that are utilized during anesthesia, the safety profile is so much better than before. READ MORE
It is always a risk to undergo any procedure, however with the monitors and medications that are utilized during anesthesia, the safety profile is so much better than before. It is important as her parent to make sure you answer all of the questions the anesthesiologist has regarding past medical history, allergies, any untoward anesthesia event in the family. It is also important that you monitor your child the night before and the next day of the procedure for eating or drinking anything, if she did, report that to the anesthesiologist. I would also recommend that your child not undergo anesthesia for an elective procedure if she has an upper respiratory infection.