expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Jake Joseph Krisik, M.D.

Anesthesiologist

Dr. Jake Joseph Krisik M.D. is a top Anesthesiologist in Minneapolis, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. Jake Joseph Krisik M.D. is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. Jake Joseph Krisik M.D. is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. Jake Joseph Krisik M.D. is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Minneapolis, MN, Dr. Jake Joseph Krisik M.D. is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
13 years Experience
Dr. Jake Joseph Krisik, M.D.
  • Minneapolis, MN
  • Med College Of Wisconsin
  • Accepting new patients

Is there a difference between local and regional anesthesia?

Depends on the context. "Local" = "local anesthetics", like lidocaine, bupivacaine, etc. These medications block nerve conduction, and therefore block sensation, pain, and READ MORE
Depends on the context.

"Local" = "local anesthetics", like lidocaine, bupivacaine, etc. These medications block nerve conduction, and therefore block sensation, pain, and motor function

If a surgery is scheduled as a "local", in general that means the surgeon/proceduralist is injecting the local anesthetic. No anesthesia personnel are involved in the procedure, so there is no additional sedation. Examples of procedures commonly performed under local alone are dental procedures, temporal artery biopsies, some toe and finger procedures, etc

If a surgery is scheduled as a "peripheral nerve block," then the anesthesiologist injects local anesthetics around specific nerves that cover the region in which an operation is taking place. They do this before surgery. Anesthesiologists are involved the entire procedure, and most commonly give IV sedation as well to make the patients more comfortable. Examples of surgeries commonly performed this way are hand and arm surgery, foot surgery, sometimes shoulder surgery, etc.

However to confuse things, anesthesiologists also commonly refer to "local anesthetics" as just "local". So they may tell a patient "I will inject local." Also, surgeons may tell patients they are "just having local", when they are really referring to the patient receiving care from an anesthesiologist, and just not needing a general anesthetic.

So the terminology depends on the context and the caregiver.

Would my diabetic medication have a counter interaction with anesthesia?

No, but listen to your primary care or OB physician as far as what medication (and what dose) to take the evening before and morning of surgery. Since you aren't eating, often READ MORE
No, but listen to your primary care or OB physician as far as what medication (and what dose) to take the evening before and morning of surgery. Since you aren't eating, often the dosing is modified, and it varies depending on each patient.