expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Michelle Karina Hughes, D.O.

Emergency Physician (Pediatric)

Dr. Michelle Arzubi-Hughes is a pediatric emergency medicine physician at Children's Hospital of the King's daughters, practicing in Norfolk, VA. Dr. Arzubi-Hughes specializes in providing care for critically ill and injured children. Her specialty interests are trauma, resuscitation and burns. Pediatric Emergency Medicine Physicians possess a vast amount of knowledge in areas such as neonatology, critical care, traumatic injuries, viral and bacterial infections, and forensic pediatrics. Children involved in automobile accidents, child abuse or near-drowning episodes are frequent cases treated by pediatric emergency medicine physicians. Pediatric emergency physicians also treat patients with minor fractures, reducing and placing them in splints, suturing up both large and small lacerations (cuts), and treating minor burns.
13 years Experience
Dr. Michelle Karina Hughes, D.O.
  • Norfolk, VA
  • New York College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Accepting new patients

What to do if a 3 year old child has a high fever of 103 degrees?

Fever of 103F is high, but if your child is still drinking well, has good energy (though less that he/she usually) does, and is easy to wake up, then giving Motrin or Tylenol (sometimes READ MORE
Fever of 103F is high, but if your child is still drinking well, has good energy (though less that he/she usually) does, and is easy to wake up, then giving Motrin or Tylenol (sometimes both, if the fever does not go down within 45 minutes). It would be good for him/her to be seen by his/her pediatrician, but not necessarily the ED. The times I suggest to go to the ER, is if they are difficult to wake up, are not making sense with their words, have difficulty breathing, and is not drinking well, having less urine over a 24 hours period.

I always suggest to look at your child, the number may or may not reflect the way your child feels. I have seen kids look great with 103F, and kids look miserable with 99F... it all depends what the underlying illness is.

I hope this helps.

Should I be concerned about the Tide Pod challenge?

That is a great question. 1. Yes, you should be concerned, this challenge can be deadly. 2. If you have noticed that your son, or anyone, has ingested anything concerning: READ MORE
That is a great question.

1. Yes, you should be concerned, this challenge can be deadly.

2. If you have noticed that your son, or anyone, has ingested anything concerning:

a. Call Poison Control 1-800-222-1222

b. Call EMS/take them to the closest ED (unless poison control states otherwise)

Sincerely,

Dr. Arzubi-Hughes

My 3 year old shoved a bead in his nose and I can't get it out!

The best and safest thing to do is to go to the ED and get it removed immediately. If your pediatrician can see you within the same time frame, that works as well. However, it READ MORE
The best and safest thing to do is to go to the ED and get it removed immediately. If your pediatrician can see you within the same time frame, that works as well. However, it is always important to make sure nothing else has been out in the nose or any other orifices, which doctors should check out.

Sincerely,

Michelle K. Arzubi-Hughes, D.O., FAAP

What is the quick way to treat vomiting in small kids?

That is a great question. If your child vomits only once or twice and feels better afterwards, my suggestion is to slowly introduce fluids, and keep him/her hydrated. However, READ MORE
That is a great question. If your child vomits only once or twice and feels better afterwards, my suggestion is to slowly introduce fluids, and keep him/her hydrated. However, if your child vomits multiple times, there are many serious causes for this vomiting and it is important that he/she is evaluated in the emergency department. Also, the age is a big factor: Younger children can become dehydrated much faster than older children, so IV fluids are imperative.

You did the right thing in taking your daughter to the ER.


Sincerely,

Michelle K. Arzubi-Hughes, D.O., FAAP