expert type icon EXPERT

Tanya Scurry

Psychiatrist

Dr. Tanya Scurry is a top Psychiatrist in Ontario, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. Tanya Scurry is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through her designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. Tanya Scurry is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. Tanya Scurry is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Ontario, CA, Dr. Tanya Scurry is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine. She is the only provider offering Ketamine infusions for treatment resistant depression and anxiety in the Inland Empire.
15 years Experience
Tanya Scurry
  • Ontario, CA
  • American university of the Caribbean
  • Accepting new patients

Is it safe to drink alcohol while taking Zoloft?

Hi, this is a great question and thank you for asking. It's not recommended to drink alcohol (depressant) with an anti-depressant of any kind. This is due to the competing effects READ MORE
Hi, this is a great question and thank you for asking. It's not recommended to drink alcohol (depressant) with an anti-depressant of any kind. This is due to the competing effects of the substances. Also some people experience sedation with Zoloft and the concurrent use of another substance such as alcohol that can also cause sedation would increase the risk of sleepiness. Also, meds such as Zoloft are psychoactive meaning that some people can have nightmares or other cognitive changes. Alcohol can, unfortunately, cause similar reactions. In short, I wouldn't recommend the combination as it's potentially unsafe. If you have any other questions please let me know. Thank you, Tanya.

At night, thinking prevents me from sleeping. Can I do anything about it?

Hi, I can tell this must be frustrating for you. Sleep is very important to our daily functioning. There could be many reasons why your mind won't turn off. Could be worries, READ MORE
Hi, I can tell this must be frustrating for you. Sleep is very important to our daily functioning. There could be many reasons why your mind won't turn off. Could be worries, racing thoughts (related to bipolar illness for example), reflective thoughts, etc? May I ask what are you thinking about primarily? Are you stressed? I'd first try to determine what types of thoughts you have then figure out why you're having them. You may need to consult a therapist to assist you with this but my experience has been that most people know what's bothering them--it's just really hard to say it out loud. There may be something weighing heavily on your mind such as family, your job, relationships, etc that perhaps is difficult to deal with but really hits you hard at night when you're trying to rest. Before I'd recommend any meds (natural or prescription), again, I'd reflect on the origin of the thoughts. I'd be happy to discuss further in another follow-up question if you like. Please take care of yourself. Sincerely, Tanya

Sudden mental fatigue--what can it be?

Hi, this is a good question and I'm sorry that you're struggling with this. Are you experiencing any stressors? Has your diet, sleep changed lately? Are you feeling depressed READ MORE
Hi, this is a good question and I'm sorry that you're struggling with this.

Are you experiencing any stressors? Has your diet, sleep changed lately? Are you feeling depressed or sad about anything? When was your last physical? Do you have any nutritional issues such as low iron, not drinking enough water, other vitamin/mineral deficiencies? Is it your thyroid? There are so many potential causes. First, I would visit my PCP to have a full physical if you haven't had one lately. Then I'd reflect on any stressors. Usually, the answer to questions like these can be determined with a full medical work-up and an individual taking a really close look at their lives and if there have been any changes that would lead to mental fatigue.

I'm having some severe chest pain with anxiety. Is this dangerous? What could it be?

Hi, this is a very common concern. Chest pain, tightness, shortness of breath can occur with anxiety attacks. These symptoms can also be associated with serious physical issues READ MORE
Hi, this is a very common concern. Chest pain, tightness, shortness of breath can occur with anxiety attacks. These symptoms can also be associated with serious physical issues as well. I'd recommend that if this happens again that you seek medical attention to rule out any physical problem. Don't automatically assume that it's a panic attack although if you are prone to panic this may very well be what's going on but not necessarily. Are you having any numbness/tingling with the chest pain? Any other symptoms like heartburn, reflux? Does it happen around or after meal time? Do you have a history of heart trouble, high blood pressure, or other medical issues? All of these things need to be taken into consideration when trying to determine if chest pain is due solely to a panic attack. I hope this helps but if you have other questions please let me know. Sincerely, Tanya

Privacy and confidentiality with caregivers

Hi, Thanks so much for your question. If your patient has given written consent to the physician to release information to you, then you can receive the information. Also, READ MORE
Hi,

Thanks so much for your question. If your patient has given written consent to the physician to release information to you, then you can receive the information. Also, if the patient's family has legal authority to give consent for release of information, then this would work as well. Please let me know if this answers your question or if you have any further concerns. Please have a good day.

Sincerely,
Tanya

Depression and Alcohol..Chicken or the egg?

Hi, That is an excellent question and one that many people wonder. As an addiction psychiatrist for almost 10 years, I can say that my observations have been that folks are READ MORE
Hi,

That is an excellent question and one that many people wonder. As an addiction psychiatrist for almost 10 years, I can say that my observations have been that folks are struggling with a mood and/or anxiety disorder that led to the drug use. We all do something to cope with our emotional (and physical) pain and alcohol is one of the ways that people cope. Some of us eat, shop, take other drugs, use the internet, have sex, etc. I'd respectfully recommend that you seek out a psychiatrist who specializes in dual diagnosis patients and then strongly consider talk therapy to get at the root of why you drink. Many folks can trace their pain back to childhood traumas. I have to tell you that digging into the "whys" will be painful, but the question is are you emotionally prepared to find out the "whys" so you can start to fix the underlying issue or are you not ready to process the truths. My sense is that's why your sobriety is short-lived--the true reason for your drinking has not yet been sorted out.

I thank you for your question and am keeping warm thoughts for you. Let me know if you have any other questions.

Take care of yourself, Tanya

Can I go to a psychiatrist instead of a psychologist?

Hi, That's a great question! Sometimes, with all of the mental health providers out there it can get confusing on who to see. Many psychiatrists are skilled talk therapists. READ MORE
Hi,

That's a great question! Sometimes, with all of the mental health providers out there it can get confusing on who to see. Many psychiatrists are skilled talk therapists. However, there are psychiatrists who choose to practice medication management only, which means no therapy. Visits are generally brief in this case. If you don't feel the need for meds, I'd recommend a good licensed counselor, psychologist, or MFT (marriage, family therapist) in your area. The most important thing is to make sure that you work with someone who you have a rapport with. If not, then it's a waste of time for you as you will not feel comfortable with that person and no progress will be made.

I hope that helps. Please let me know if you need any other assistance.

Take care,
Tanya

My son has Asperger's Syndrome. How is it treated?

Hi, What an interesting question? Generally, autism spectrum disorders such as Asperger's are generally treated using behavioral and social interventions such as teaching appropriate READ MORE
Hi,

What an interesting question? Generally, autism spectrum disorders such as Asperger's are generally treated using behavioral and social interventions such as teaching appropriate social interaction, decreasing their stress triggers, and providing support. There are organizations such as NAMI and the Asperger/Autism Network (http://www.aane.org/) that may be of benefit to you (e.g. resources, caregiver support, referrals, etc.).

As with all treatments for any condition (medical or psychiatric), treatments can and will vary as people don't respond in the same way to a treatment. I wish you well and if you have any other questions, please let me know.

Thank you,
Tanya