expert type icon EXPERT

MARC THOMAS

Dentist (Pediatric)

Dr. MARC THOMAS is a top Dentist (Pediatric) in Parker, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. MARC THOMAS is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. MARC THOMAS is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. MARC THOMAS is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Parker, CO, Dr. MARC THOMAS is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
11 years Experience
MARC THOMAS
  • Parker, CO
  • UCLA School of Dentistry
  • Accepting new patients

Is it important for children to floss their teeth daily?

Yes, especially for children over the age of 6. At 6 the adult molars and incisors begin to come in and typically the teeth become tighter at that time. Flossing ensures that the READ MORE
Yes, especially for children over the age of 6. At 6 the adult molars and incisors begin to come in and typically the teeth become tighter at that time. Flossing ensures that the area where the teeth tough is kept clean. 

Marc D. Thomas DDS

How can I make the process of losing teeth easier for my son?

There are a couple things. Explaining that it is normal, that all of his friends will do it and trying to get him excited about the tooth fairy can help. If you have a pet such READ MORE
There are a couple things. Explaining that it is normal, that all of his friends will do it and trying to get him excited about the tooth fairy can help. If you have a pet such as a puppy you can explain and show him with the puppy loses baby teeth. Finally, you can research his favorite cartoon character. Chances are there is a book or a TV show of that character's first visit to the dentist or losing his first tooth. In summary the idea is to normalize the idea of losing teeth.

Do kids with lactose intolerance have weak teeth?

There is no published data to answer your question so this is my personal opinion and draws from my patients that are lactose intolerant. There are many common non-dairy sources READ MORE
There is no published data to answer your question so this is my personal opinion and draws from my patients that are lactose intolerant. There are many common non-dairy sources of calcium such as orange juice, soy milk and enriched flour. I would look at the dietary information on the breads and cereals that are being eaten and it is probably a sufficient amount of calcium. You also want to check to make sure that Vitamin D is optimal. From a dental standpoint, the lactose intolerance should not affect his long-term dental health as long as his calcium and fluoride are optimal, he avoids sweets and brushes and flosses well. There are common cavity preventive strategies that your dentist can share such as sealants, fluoride varnish and regular check-ups.

What are the chances that the spaces in my daughter's teeth will recur when her permanent teeth grow in?

Spacing between baby teeth is a good, healthy thing at 4 years of age. There is a decreased risk of cavities and it may be positive for her future dental alignment. Generally, READ MORE
Spacing between baby teeth is a good, healthy thing at 4 years of age. There is a decreased risk of cavities and it may be positive for her future dental alignment. Generally, the front adult teeth are wider than the baby teeth. If the spacing is even and not excessive, this can translate to very straight permanent teeth. A good way to predict would be to have your daughter have an X-ray to check the alignment of the developing front permanent teeth. 
Sometimes, people have a strong flap of skin connecting the upper lip to between the front teeth called a "frenum" or "frenulum." If this flap is too thick or strong, it will keep a gap or "diastema" open on the front teeth. This is the most common way to have spacing on the permanent teeth and sometimes requires a minor surgery to be removed. 
Marc D. Thomas, DDS

When should a child start brushing his own teeth?

There are two parts to answering your questions. First, children should brush their own teeth when they develop the dexterity to do so. As your son continues to learn how to write, his READ MORE
There are two parts to answering your questions. First, children should brush their own teeth when they develop the dexterity to do so. As your son continues to learn how to write, his ability to brush will naturally follow. Second, children need to develop a willingness to brush and an understanding of its importance. This is more variable and can take several more years to develop. Finally, I would add that engraining the habit of brushing for two minutes, twice daily now and brushing every surface of every tooth will benefit him as he begins to brush his own teeth. 

Marc D. Thomas