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Dr. Beemeth Robles

Anesthesiologist

Dr. Beemeth Robles is a top Anesthesiologist in Phoenix, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. Beemeth Robles is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. Beemeth Robles is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. Beemeth Robles is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Phoenix, Arizona, Dr. Beemeth Robles is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
Dr. Beemeth Robles
  • Phoenix, Arizona
  • Stanford University
  • Accepting new patients

Is there a difference between local and regional anesthesia?

Today with more nerve blocks being performed, I believe many are using the terms interchangeably. The term regional denotes a specific area as opposed to a general anesthetic READ MORE
Today with more nerve blocks being performed, I believe many are using the terms interchangeably. The term regional denotes a specific area as opposed to a general anesthetic which is a state of unconsciousness that is generalized to the entire being. When I was in training the lines were not as blurred. Back then, we typically referred to spinal and epidural anesthetics as regional anesthetics. A lot of nerve blocks were not being done in my training which I finished 25 years ago. However, one thing that is for sure, all regional anesthetics as well as "locals", require the use of a local anesthetic. Today if the surgeon schedules a case as "local with sedation" for example, the surgeon plans to inject the local anesthetic in the area of surgery, while we provide sedation so that the surgeon can inject the local anesthetic with minimal discomfort to the patient. The injection of local anesthetic can be quite uncomfortable for many patients so the provision of sedation makes it less traumatizing to the patient. Thus, today regional techniques refer to the old spinal and epidural anesthetics, plus a variety of nerve blocks. Most local anesthetics are limited to small and area-specific site surgeries. Further, local anesthetic injections in a specific site are limited as to what type of surgery can be performed. No amount of local anesthetic injected by a surgeon into a shoulder could allow a surgeon to operate on a shoulder but a single interscalene nerve block can certainly allow a surgeon to perform shoulder surgery very effectively. I hope I have not muddied the waters.

Is high blood pressure bad for anesthesia?

Many patients have high blood pressure and are on medications for that condition. Having treated hypertension should not be a significant issue for your gall bladder surgery per READ MORE
Many patients have high blood pressure and are on medications for that condition. Having treated hypertension should not be a significant issue for your gall bladder surgery per se. However, keep in mind I do not have a complete history or a list of medications that you are taking so my answer is also not complete. A greater problem for you would be if you have high blood pressure and you do not take medications. So long as you are appropriately treated, you should be fine during your anesthetic. Typically, blood pressure is monitored with an automated blood pressure cuff, which I typically check every 2 1/2 minutes, though the range can be every minute to as long as every 5 minutes (vital signs during anesthesia are recorded every 5 minutes by many anesthesiologists).

Is anesthesia risky for a COPD patient?

There is always some level of risk but if his disease state is medically managed and is optimal, he should be able to have an anesthetic safely. Of course, given the type of surgery READ MORE
There is always some level of risk but if his disease state is medically managed and is optimal, he should be able to have an anesthetic safely. Of course, given the type of surgery it can have an impact on him, if his lung function is poor. I have done plenty of anesthetics for patients with COPD and they have done well. The risk seems to be greater in the postoperative period given that they have a slightly increased risk of pulmonary complications as they have chronic secretions which are harder to clear and their physiology is not normal. One should not forget, if the lung disease is significant, the type of surgery may lend itself to other types of anesthetics besides general anesthesia. Some surgeries can be performed with sedation and local anesthesia. Other surgeries can be done with nerve blocks with sedation. Finally, there is spinal or epidural anesthesia. Keep in mind that sedation can be light or conscious sedation, it can be moderate sedation where the patient is still arousable and then there is deep sedation where the patient remains unconscious during the procedure. Sedation is not sufficient for surgery, if local anesthesia or a nerve block is not performed in conjunction with the sedation. If the surgery is performed with intravenous sedation only, then its still general anesthesia and very likely that the patient will have some type of airway device inserted in their throat, though it may not be a "breathing tube" otherwise known as an endotracheal tube.

What kind of anesthesia will I be given for my cataract surgery?

Typically you are given a sedative prior to the surgeon administering local anesthesia to "numb" the eye. The injection is not given into the eye itself but rather an injection READ MORE
Typically you are given a sedative prior to the surgeon administering local anesthesia to "numb" the eye. The injection is not given into the eye itself but rather an injection is done below or around the eye itself. I have not done an injection (block) for eye surgery for a very long time. Back then we did retrobulbar blocks, where a needle is inserted through the skin below the eye into the eye socket and behind the eye itself. Today there is a different approach which still requires local anesthesia. General anesthesia is rarely utilized and usually reserved for unconventional situations, for example, if a patient has tremors and cannot lie still.

Why was my son given anesthesia for a CT scan?

A CT Scan requires cooperation on the patient's part and a 3 year old is not going to sit still while they are in a foreign place, with strangers around and away from the comforts READ MORE
A CT Scan requires cooperation on the patient's part and a 3 year old is not going to sit still while they are in a foreign place, with strangers around and away from the comforts of parents. I have done general anesthesia for both MRIs and CT scan on children and it was appropriate.

Can anesthesia leave a person dazed and drowsy for over two days?

Your question is if it is possible to be drowsy days after a procedure and the answer is anything is possible. What matters most is to understand what medications were given and READ MORE
Your question is if it is possible to be drowsy days after a procedure and the answer is anything is possible. What matters most is to understand what medications were given and appreciate the effects of these drugs on the patient. Now, if you ask if it is typical to have these effects after endoscopy anesthesia, then I would have to say no. Typically I provide anesthesia with Propofol only and no other drugs and most patients feel pretty good within a short time in recovery. I would definitely ask about what medications were used for the procedure. Also, you did not say how old your husband is. The older the patient the more of an impact medications can have on patients.

My son was given anesthesia before his CT scan and is now drowsy. Is this normal?

It is difficult to answer this question as the term "anesthesia" is not defined. Did the child have an anesthesiologist involved or was the child given an oral medication? If READ MORE
It is difficult to answer this question as the term "anesthesia" is not defined. Did the child have an anesthesiologist involved or was the child given an oral medication? If the medication was given orally, then they were given sedation. There was a time when drugs like Chloral Hydrate was commonly given to children for procedures and tests and this would lead to prolonged sedation. If an anesthesiologist was involved and the child was given inhalational or intravenous anesthesia then prolonged sedation would be much less likely. However, it is well known that prolonged inhalational anesthesia will lead children to awaken in a state which we call emergence delirium and in such cases children can be given sedatives so that they awaken in a calmer state, and sedatives and narcotics can last for hours. There is no same approach for every patient so one cannot say that "my child was given anesthesia" and then ask if it is normal for them to be drowsy hours later. Need specifics about was done and given to the child.

Can anesthesia be administered to a patient with diabetes?

Yes, anesthesia can be administered to a diabetic patient. If he has pus in his ankle then he needs to have the infection treated otherwise his diabetes will be more difficult READ MORE
Yes, anesthesia can be administered to a diabetic patient. If he has pus in his ankle then he needs to have the infection treated otherwise his diabetes will be more difficult to manage and his infection will worsen due to the uncontrolled diabetes. Keep in mind, that your husband does not have to undergo a general anesthetic, which is what I believe your question is based. There are nerve blocks that can be done to provide anesthesia for the surgery and he does not necessarily need to have general anesthetic. As to safety of anesthesia, I have anesthetized hundreds, if not thousands of patients with diabetes without a bad anesthetic outcome, so yes it should be safe. The information I share here is based on the limited information you have shared with me.

Can an overdose of anesthesia cause death?

To answer the question, "can an overdose of anesthesia cause death", the simple answer is yes. HOWEVER, anesthesia is a state of unconsciousness that is adjusted to the patient READ MORE
To answer the question, "can an overdose of anesthesia cause death", the simple answer is yes.
HOWEVER, anesthesia is a state of unconsciousness that is adjusted to the patient and the surgical procedure. There are no formulas or paradigms that one can assume and "dial in".
An anesthesiologist provides to a patient what they "need". The need is determined by what happens in the operating room, what the surgeon requires and what the patient can tolerate. There is no auto-pilot.
As to your fear, I have no magic bullet to share with you to take it away. HOWEVER, keep in mind that the day you have surgery, that day you are likely to drive or be driven to the surgery center or hospital where you will have surgery, and being in a vehicle is way more dangerous than having anesthesia, and yet you probably get in a vehicle regularly and never give it a second thought.
Life is filled with hazards, but back surgery is done all the time, though there are many types. For perspective, I have provided probably close to 20,000 anesthetics in my career and no one has ever died in the operating room OR under my care. I suspect your anesthesiologist should offer a similar experience. In life, bad things happen and we control very little, but anesthesia care should be overall safe for you.

I need to undergo a nail removal treatment. Will anesthesia have to be administered for this?

First of all, if you have a foot injury, I would make sure to have the opinion of an orthopedist, who specializes in foot and ankle surgery or a podiatrist take a look at your READ MORE
First of all, if you have a foot injury, I would make sure to have the opinion of an orthopedist, who specializes in foot and ankle surgery or a podiatrist take a look at your problem. A chipped nail may not need to be removed. With this said, if you choose to have the nail removed, I would suspect that you will need anesthesia as it would otherwise potentially be a painful procedure. I do not really have enough details to give a complete answer. If the toe is the issue, you should be able to have a local anesthetic injection to numb the toe. You should not need a general anesthetic, however, the injections can be briefly uncomfortable as they are injections.