expert type icon EXPERT

Peter C.R. Schuringa

Hand Surgeon

Dr. Peter C.R. Schuringa is a renowned hand and wrist surgeon in Kitchener, Ontario, specializing in the diagnosis, surgical and rehabilitative treatment of conditions that affect the hands and wrist. He is the president and lead surgeon at Dr. Peter Schuringa Medical Professional Corporation, as well as the President of Handworx. Handworx is an exclusive physiotherapy and occupational therapy practice delivering treatment and rehabilitation of disorders, injuries, or impairments that affect the hand, either after injury or surgical reconstruction.

Follow Dr. Peter Schuringa to learn more about conditions, treatments and surgery of the hand and wrist.
Peter C.R. Schuringa
Specializes in:
  • Hand Injuries and Disorders
  • Hand Surgery
  • Waterloo, Ontario
  • Queens University
  • Not accepting new patients

I got glass stuck in my hand but had it removed. Why does my hand hurt even after removal?

Every injury takes time to heal. Common time to full healing is 6 weeks.

My son jammed his thumb while playing tennis. Could there be a permanent damage?

The thumb should be examined by someone with good knowledge regarding these injuries, preferably a hand surgeon or a hand therapist. It is possible that there may be permanent READ MORE
The thumb should be examined by someone with good knowledge regarding these injuries, preferably a hand surgeon or a hand therapist. It is possible that there may be permanent or irreversible damage even in the absence of a fracture. Examination of the thumb is necessary to rule out other possible injuries.

How long will it take for me to recover from a hand surgery?

Recovery time can be a matter of a couple of weeks or many months, depending.

I have been diagnosed with trigger finger syndrome. What is the course of treatment for this?

Trigger thumb can most often be treated successfully with one or more injections of a corticosteroid, however, up to 25% of patients will have recurrent symptoms, and I usually READ MORE
Trigger thumb can most often be treated successfully with one or more injections of a corticosteroid, however, up to 25% of patients will have recurrent symptoms, and I usually advise a surgical release of the first segment of the flexor tendon sheath if the issue is not resolved after 2 injections with the corticosteroid.

What could be the cause of my wrist pain?

Unfortunately, that is simply far too broad a question to be answered via indirect inquiry. The list of possible causes for wrist pain in any environment, whether working at a READ MORE
Unfortunately, that is simply far too broad a question to be answered via indirect inquiry. The list of possible causes for wrist pain in any environment, whether working at a computer or in any other setting, is extensive. Without investigation and clinical examination, one could only speculate regarding any number of potential causes for pain.

I have a ganglion cyst in my left wrist

Often, a ganglion can be aspirated (drained). But sometimes, the fluid is too thick to draw through a needle. They frequently come back after aspiration. Surgery is most often READ MORE
Often, a ganglion can be aspirated (drained). But sometimes, the fluid is too thick to draw through a needle. They frequently come back after aspiration. Surgery is most often a cure as recurrence is far less frequent. This should be performed by an orthopaedic surgeon or plastic surgeon with specific skills in hand and wrist surgery.

I am experiencing stiffness in my finger after an injury. What could be the reason?

There are many different reasons a digit may be stiff after injury. This should be examined urgently by a physician.

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome?

Early symptoms of CTS can be managed with use of wrist splinting at night as needed to control symptoms of awaking with numbness and pain in the morning. When that is not effective READ MORE
Early symptoms of CTS can be managed with use of wrist splinting at night
as needed to control symptoms of awaking with numbness and pain in the
morning. When that is not effective or daytime symptoms predominate,
surgery is the most common recommended treatment because it is a relatively
simple procedure with high success rates (permanent ) and low risk of
complications. Occasionally when circumstances are not optimal for
surgery an injection of corticosteroid into the carpal tunnel may control
symptoms, but this is almost universally just a temporary solution.

When symptoms are severe and/or electrodiagnostic tests indicate severe
nerve impairment I recommend urgent surgery. Failure to proceed to surgery
may lead to irreversible nerve damage.