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Dr. Mark Buckner

Emergency Physician

Dr. Mark Buckner is a top Emergency Physician in Decatur, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. Mark Buckner is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. Mark Buckner is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. Mark Buckner is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Decatur, Texas, Dr. Mark Buckner is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
Dr. Mark Buckner
  • Decatur, Texas
  • Texas Tech University Health Science Center
  • Accepting new patients

Do I need to go to the hospital after using an EpiPen?

It would depend on how severe your allergic reaction had progressed, how much symptom relief you got, and, in general, how you are feeling. If your reaction was severe, and for READ MORE
It would depend on how severe your allergic reaction had progressed, how much symptom relief you got, and, in general, how you are feeling. If your reaction was severe, and for example, you still had a rash - hives - then I would recommend you take two Claritin 10mg by mouth, take 50mg of Benadryl, then, yes - go to the hospital or a freestanding ER. The effects of the epipen will wear off, but the antigen, which in your case is the peanut, would still be lingering in your body. So, when the medication in the epipen wears off, your symptoms may very well return. So, it is a good idea to be in a place where medical professionals can observe you for a period of time, and be able to treat you if the returning symptoms are severe. The short answer is, yes. I recommend you read the instructions that came with it, and also maybe Google "epipen." This will give you a good idea of what is recommended.

What is the difference between Emergency Physicians and Trauma Surgeons?

Emergency physicians are trained to treat and stabilize any type of patient that comes into the ER. For severe trauma cases, they may call a surgeon to come to the ER to assist READ MORE
Emergency physicians are trained to treat and stabilize any type of patient that comes into the ER. For severe trauma cases, they may call a surgeon to come to the ER to assist in the care of the patient. It all depends on the injuries that were sustained by the patient. In general, surgeons work in the operating room. Emergency physicians in the ER. In a few hospitals, such as a level 1 trauma center such as Parkland in Dallas, they may have a trauma surgeon either in the ER 24/7 or always on call for them. A trauma surgeon is a general surgeon who has gone further in training, and requires doing a trauma fellowship. So, they specialized in trauma. Just like a plastic surgeon specializes in plastics. A general surgeon can take care of a certain level of trauma patients, but those patients who are still critical will usually get stabilized by the general surgeon and the ER doctor, then transferred to a level 1 trauma center. General surgeons typically operate on things like the gallbladder, appendix, and other standard operations. Emergency physicians are trained in trauma, but they are also trained in practically everything else: pediatrics, heart attacks, basically emergency medical conditions.

When should I be worried about a fever in my child?

I would prefer not to use the word "worry." Instead, I would ask, "When should I think about taking my child to the doctor if there is a fever?" Any child with a documented temperature READ MORE
I would prefer not to use the word "worry." Instead, I would ask, "When should I think about taking my child to the doctor if there is a fever?" Any child with a documented temperature of 102 should go see a doctor. Children with a fever are at a higher risk of having bad outcomes if less than 2 years old. There are many causes of fever. Some are serious and may require hospitalization, and some are less serious and can be treated as an outpatient. "Serious" = meningitis, septic shock, or influenza, as examples. Less serious are an ear infection, throat infection, etc. The take-home answer is, it takes a physician to be able to tell what is causing the fever, and separate the bad causes from the not-so-bad ones. But, a fever is always a sign of infection in a four-year-old, and they should always see a doctor ASAP. Tylenol and ibuprofen are okay and wise to give, but that doesn't change the need to go to the doctor.

Should I go to the ER for a UTI?

If you are having abdominal pain and fever, you need to go to the ER. It's as simple as that. That's because there are a number of serious conditions that can cause fever with READ MORE
If you are having abdominal pain and fever, you need to go to the ER. It's as simple as that. That's because there are a number of serious conditions that can cause fever with abdominal pain. The UTI symptoms may be a completely separate matter. Many patients will have more than one diagnosis at the same time.

What is the best way to treat food poisoning?

The first thing to do is be sure it is "Food poisoning", which we call "Food-borne illness". Typically if it is a food borne illness, patients will have both vomiting and diarrhea. READ MORE
The first thing to do is be sure it is "Food poisoning", which we call "Food-borne illness". Typically if it is a food borne illness, patients will have both vomiting and diarrhea. If no diarrhea, a food borne illness is less likely. Treatment at first consists of simply treating the symptoms. Start a clear liquid diet, drink small sips of a clear liquid such as water. If vomiting and can't keep liquids down, the patient will likely need a prescription medicine to stop the vomiting. Preventing dehydration is the main goal. When you have vomiting and diarrhea, you are losing electrolytes such as sodium and potassium, so drinking gatorade or pedialyte is good to add to drinking water. For the diarrhea, use only pepto bismol. I advise against using otc medications like lomotil, imodium, etc. They paralyze the smooth muscles of the colon, and if the diarrhea is infection related, those will make things worse.

If vomiting and diarrhea go on for more than 2 days, or if there is fever, it is most likely a bacterial infection and antibiotics will be needed. Most food borne illness is viral, and should resolve within 1-3 days. Anything longer than that will require a dr visit. In short, prevent dehydration is the primary goal in the treatment, and stopping the vomiting.

What is the treatment for low sugar?

As with any patient that I can't see or talk to, it depends. I am going to assume she is a type 2 diabetic, which means she takes oral medications for her diabetes. 1 thing it READ MORE
As with any patient that I can't see or talk to, it depends. I am going to assume she is a type 2 diabetic, which means she takes oral medications for her diabetes. 1 thing it depends on is HOW LOW the BS is. The more important question is, does the sugar get so low that she has symptoms, such as light headedness, or becoming less alert or even unconscious? Hopefully that hasn't occurred, and if she keeps good track of her blood sugars, as soon as it starts getting to around 75 or less, she needs to eat something with carbohydrates. If she is becoming less alert, but can still swallow, give her a sugary drink - OJ, Pepsi, whatever, or even some sugar. I would always rather see someone with a BS of 190, than 30. 1 thing to remember is that if she takes pills for her diabetes, these are typically long acting meds, and even if you get the sugar back up, that medication is still in her system, and there is a good chance her sugar will drop again later on. It sounds like she needs to see her doctor, and have them adjust her medications.

What should be my first steps if my child convulses?

First, I am assuming, which I don't like to do, that your child is young, probably less than 5-6 years old. Febrile seizures, which is what you are describing, can happen to younger READ MORE
First, I am assuming, which I don't like to do, that your child is young, probably less than 5-6 years old. Febrile seizures, which is what you are describing, can happen to younger children, and often it's just a one-time thing. The next time your child has a fever, they may not have a seizure. Most children with this don't end up later in life needing seizure medicines. I am also assuming the doctor in the ER did some tests on your child, because some febrile seizures can be associated with serious infections such as meningitis. As an ER doctor, it is a decision we must make in each scenario, whether or not to do a lumbar puncture, or spinal tap (same thing), to rule out meningitis.
Directly to your question - first, do not try to put anything in your child's mouth; that will only increase the chance that you obstruct the child's airway. Make sure that the child is laying somewhere where the seizure will not cause them to injure themselves, such as a concrete floor. Then, just keep the child protected from injury and watch for a short time, watch exactly what type of movements they are making so you can describe them well to the ER doctor. Nearly all of these seizures will stop within a minute or so. If it continues for much longer than a couple of minutes, I suggest you call 911, as it may be something else that paramedics can start to treat. If it stops after one minute or so and your child becomes alert again, place them in a comfortable place, and give them tylenol and ibuprofen to decrease the fever. Take their temperature so you can tell ER staff. Those are about the only things you need to do at first. Then you should go to the ER, as long as the child is alert, like I said. If they aren't, call 911.
In the ER, tests should be done to rule out causes of the fever, such as meningitis, ear infection, etc. It is not a "normal" side effect of the fever. Most children who get a feverdo not have a seizure. But some do, and it is due to the fever, although this is not really well understood. It is believed to be somewhat hereditary, in other words, many children who have a febrile seizure have a relative who also had these when they were young. Typically, as the child ages, the chances of a febrile seizure decrease. Also, the degree of fever does not seem to matter. A child with a temp of 101F can have the same seizure as one with a temp of 104F. The primary thing, when you first see that your child is having a seizure, is to protect them from harming themselves further by falling or hitting their head, etc. That is your first priority.

What are the blood tests necessary in a ER?

There is not a set of tests for every patient in the ER. The tests we do depend on the patient's problem, age, vital signs, and other factors. So, we often do tests, but it is READ MORE
There is not a set of tests for every patient in the ER. The tests we do depend on the patient's problem, age, vital signs, and other factors. So, we often do tests, but it is not a "one size fits all" type of thing. It is very individual, dependent on the patient's condition. For migraines, sometimes there aren't any tests that need to be done. Some migraine patients might need a head CT scan, especially if it's their first migraine, or if it's the worst headache they've ever had.

Have I been bitten?

If you were bitten by a black widow, number 1, it would depend on the amount, if any, of venom that went through the skin. But I would highly expect you to have symptoms by now, READ MORE
If you were bitten by a black widow, number 1, it would depend on the amount, if any, of venom that went through the skin. But I would highly expect you to have symptoms by now, so it's unlikely.

Stomach flu

If this has been going on for more than 3 days, it is likely bacterial. There could be a number of reasons for this. I suggest that you go to the nearest ER or urgent care clinic READ MORE
If this has been going on for more than 3 days, it is likely bacterial. There could be a number of reasons for this. I suggest that you go to the nearest ER or urgent care clinic so you can be tested and given IV fluids.

Is blood pressure levels of 210/100 an emergency?

It sounds like this is a blood pressure level that constitutes an emergency, especially if the levels are consistent. More importantly, if she is elderly and has other medical READ MORE
It sounds like this is a blood pressure level that constitutes an emergency, especially if the levels are consistent. More importantly, if she is elderly and has other medical diseases such as diabetes, this could be the beginning of a heart attack. It definitely warrants a trip to the ER.

Appendicitis?

Appendicitis is a tricky illness. Quite often, it does not present with the textbook symptoms. It often presents with patients having atypical symptoms. Classic textbook symptoms READ MORE
Appendicitis is a tricky illness. Quite often, it does not present with the textbook symptoms. It often presents with patients having atypical symptoms. Classic textbook symptoms would be pain in the abdomen, often starting at the umbilicus, and then after a variable time moving to the right lower quadrant of the abdomen. It would be a constant pain. As it progresses, other symptoms would begin, such as nausea, vomiting, fever, and possible urine problems. The urine symptoms are because sometimes an inflamed appendix will touch and push on the bladder. It is always hard to diagnose a patient without being able to examine them, but if the pain is as severe as you say, I think it warrants a trip to the emergency room for labs, an exam, and probably a CT scan. Don't put this off too long, as the appendix can rupture, which will make the hospital stay longer and cause many complications.

Can being hit in the head cause a seizure?

Yes, someone could have a seizure if hit hard enough in the head. Depending on the mechanism of injury, being hit in the head could cause facial fractures or bleeding in the brain READ MORE
Yes, someone could have a seizure if hit hard enough in the head. Depending on the mechanism of injury, being hit in the head could cause facial fractures or bleeding in the brain - which might subsequently cause of seizure. If someone is seizure prone (in other words, has had prior seizures or is at risk of them), they should have an evaluation done by a neurologist, and possibly be put on anti-seizure medicine.

What are the first few steps in case of a cardiac arrest?

This is a difficult question to answer, for one reason. We are all different -- I think of it as we are all wired differently. Because of that, there are a significant percentage READ MORE
This is a difficult question to answer, for one reason. We are all different -- I think of it as we are all wired differently. Because of that, there are a significant percentage of patients who do not present with the classical symptoms that we read about in books. For example, some patients never have any pain when they are having a heart attack (AMI FOR SHORT). They may only feel tired, or feel short of breath. The key is to prevent the AMI from happening, which means seeing your doctor, your PCP, regularly. Know what your risk factors are for having heart disease. Here is a list of risk factors that increase your likelihood of having an AMI, or heart disease. A family history, especially if people in your family have heart attacks at a young age, like 30-50 years old. This is probably the worst risk factor you can have and can't change. Smoking, having uncontrolled high blood pressure, high cholesterol, being overweight, not exercising at all, and having a poor diet, one that is high in fat. The classic symptoms of a heart attack, or AMI, are chest pain in any area of the chest, especially if the pain gets worse with exertion and gets better with rest. Other symptoms include shortness of breath, chest pain that radiates down either arm, or to the neck or back; getting sweaty with the chest pain is a bad sign. Nausea and vomiting are also possible symptoms. If you or anyone starts having these symptoms, don't wait and hope they will go away - ESPECIALLY IF YOU HAVE SEVERAL RISK FACTORS - go to your Dr. or to the ER. If someone has cardiac arrest in front of you, the first thing to do is have someone call 911, then hopefully someone has taken some type of CPR class. Check for a pulse, check to see if they are breathing, if their chest is rising and falling; if it isn't and there's no pulse, start CPR until an ambulance can get there. I recommend that all family members who have any risk factors at all take at least a basic CPR course.
Cardiac disease can be very tricky, even for a Board Certified ER Dr., again, because not everyone has textbook symptoms. I have personally found 2 patients over my >20 year career who complained of a toothache, but something about them wasn't right. I asked them cardiac questions, we did an EKG, and they were both in the midst of having a heart attack. So I never let my guard down when it comes to this diagnosis. Hope that helps.