expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Michael J. Kratchman

Dentist

Dr. Michael J. Kratchman is a top Dentist in Gibbstown, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. Michael J. Kratchman is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. Michael J. Kratchman is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. Michael J. Kratchman is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Gibbstown, New Jersey, Dr. Michael J. Kratchman is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
Dr. Michael J. Kratchman
  • Gibbstown, New Jersey
  • Temple University
  • Accepting new patients

Why does only one tooth area bleed when I floss?

Each tooth in the mouth has 6 sites that are measured for periodontal (gum) disease. If you have been diagnosed w/ periodontal disease 1 tooth may be more affected then others. The READ MORE
Each tooth in the mouth has 6 sites that are measured for periodontal (gum) disease. If you have been diagnosed w/ periodontal disease 1 tooth may be more affected then others.
The reason why you bleed in the one area is because that tooth or area may be more affected through use, wear and tear, existing restorations, etc. Flossing the area may cause initial irritation and bleeding, but doing so consistently day after day even twice a day should lead to a reduction in bleeding on flossing in that area. It's always a good idea to see your local dentist to have them evaluate the area and explain it in more detail. Whatever you do, don't stop flossing! You do not need to be aggressive, but you do need to be consistent about continual flossing in that problem area. Hopefully this helps.

I am a diabetic and my gums have been bleeding. Is there something to be concerned about?

The simple answer to both your questions is Yes and Yes. You need to be seen by your dentist asap, especially if you have not been in a while. Diabetes is a very complex disease. READ MORE
The simple answer to both your questions is Yes and Yes.
You need to be seen by your dentist asap, especially if you have not been in a while. Diabetes is a very complex disease. It effects almost every system in the body and if left uncontrolled could cause havoc or even worse. Gums should not bleed. A little bit of bleeding is often a warning that something may be going on. A lot of bleeding is a sign of lack of care or a true issue. Diabetes exacerbates everything and makes all issues just slightly worse. Please be seen for an evaluation as soon as possible and have your dental professional see what the true issues going on are.

Having an abscessed tooth? What could this mean?

An abcessed tooth means that your tooth has an infection. There are numerous reasons that this could happen. Decay could be present, there could have been a history of trauma READ MORE
An abcessed tooth means that your tooth has an infection. There are
numerous reasons that this could happen.
Decay could be present, there could have been a history of trauma to the
area, or there could be a fracture of some sort. It is hard to tell you
exactly what caused the abcess to occur. There could be a lot of pain
associated with an abcessed tooth, or there could be none at all. Often
times a pimple will appear around the area. This is usually an escape
route for the bacteria. Once the pimple is visible, pain usually
decreases, only because the build up of puss/abcess is now leaking into
your mouth and not simply burrowing a hole through your bone. There are a
number of ways to treat an abcess, but is all depends on what type of
abcess it is. IF it is tooth related, then Root Canal treatment will be
necessary. If the abcess is present on a tooth that already had a root
canal, then a second root canal or a re-treatment could be warrented, or
alternatively a procedure called an apicoectomy would remove the abcess and
the infected part of tooth and leave the remaining tooth in place.
Alternatively depending on the condition and or position of the tooth, one
might also choose to have the tooth extracted. Untreated abcesses could
cause major problems if the bacteria gets into the blood stream patients
could become septic, or due to the proximity of the jaw to the brain, the
infection could travel there as well. It is best to get abcesses treated
asap. Usually antibiotic therapy and mild analgesics initiate the healing
process, but most often that alone will not suffice. Futher treatment will
ultimately be necessary, whether that is root canal treatment, extraction,
or apicoectomy all depends on the individual situation. I hope that this
helps to answer your question.
Regards,
Michael Kratchman, DMD
Gibbstown Dentistry

Is a root canal during pregnancy safe?

To answer the question it depends on the severity of the tooth. You actually are at the most optimal time to have the root canal done. The second trimester is regarded as the READ MORE
To answer the question it depends on the severity of the tooth. You
actually are at the most optimal time to have the root canal done. The
second trimester is regarded as the safest time to have a procedure like
root canal treatment done. I am assuming that radiogrpahs (X-rays) were
already taken, if not you can have that done as well, just make sure that
you are given a led vest. It's OK to ask for two if you feel as though it
will protect you even more. You can ask you doctor to initiate the
treatment by doing a procedure like a pulpotomy or pulpectomy to get you
out of discomfort and place a temporary filling until after you give
birth. Also, have them take your bite down on that tooth (reduce your
occlusion) so you don't put added pressure on it. Once the root canal is
finished you will need a crown so taking some tooth structure off now is
not the end of the world. If your dentist feels like he can safely finish
the root canal in one visit then he may choose to do so. Again, if depends