expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Steven M. DeLuca

Orthopedist

Dr. Steven M. DeLuca is a top Orthopedist in Camp Hill, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. Steven M. DeLuca is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. Steven M. DeLuca is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. Steven M. DeLuca is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Camp Hill, Pennsylvania, Dr. Steven M. DeLuca is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
Dr. Steven M. DeLuca
  • Camp Hill, Pennsylvania
  • Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • Accepting new patients

Cortisone injections for osteoarthritis. Do they work?

A corticosteroid injection (CSI) into the base of the thumb joint (basilar joint) is likely to provide significant but temporary relief of the arthritic pain in your thumb. The READ MORE
A corticosteroid injection (CSI) into the base of the thumb joint (basilar joint) is likely to provide significant but temporary relief of the arthritic pain in your thumb. The CSI may reduce pain and swelling for weeks to months but ultimately, the arthritis will progress.

Other non-surgical treatments include: ice or heat, oral & topical anti inflammatory medications, & splints or braces. Ultimately, if non-surgical treatments fail to provide adequate relief of symptoms, surgery is very successful at eliminating the pain in this joint, although a common result is mild residual weakness of pinch strength.

Steven M. DeLuca, DO

Does tennis elbow require a surgery?

Not always. Rest, NSAIDS, a wrist brace at night, a tennis elbow strap during the day, topical pain relievers are all a good first step. PT with ultrasound (phonophoresis) or electrical READ MORE
Not always. Rest, NSAIDS, a wrist brace at night, a tennis elbow strap during the day, topical pain relievers are all a good first step. PT with ultrasound (phonophoresis) or electrical current (iontophoresis) can also help. A cortisone injection or 2 may also help but no more then 2 shots into this location. Time is important-giving these non surgical means a chance to help is a must. If all this fails, Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP) is an excellent alternative to surgery. This may require more then 1 PRP injection. Surgery to release the diseased tendon is the final option. An MRI is sometimes helpful to determine "tendinitis" versus tearing of the common extensor origin, which is a more serious condition then "tennis elbow" aka lateral epicondylitis.

Steven M. DeLuca, DO

Why does my hip crack every time I move?

There are several reasons your hip could be cracking. It may just be a normal physiologic release of nitric oxide from your hip joint as you move. This would be non-painful. If READ MORE
There are several reasons your hip could be cracking. It may just be a normal physiologic release of nitric oxide from your hip joint as you move. This would be non-painful. If it produces pain or discomfort, it may be a problem within the hip, such as a tear in the labrum or a ligament called the ligamentum teres. It could also be a condition called internal snapping hip syndrome where the hip flexor tendon (iliopsoas) snaps over the bony pelvis outside the hip joint. Either way, if it's painful, you should see an orthopedic surgeon, preferably a hip specialist. If it is non-painful, then it's likely physiologic.

Steven M. DeLuca, DO

What is the best way to manage osteoarthritis?

Osteoarthritis must be differentiated from inflammatory or rheumatoid arthritis, the latter of which is when your immune system essentially attacks the cartilage within your joints READ MORE
Osteoarthritis must be differentiated from inflammatory or rheumatoid arthritis, the latter of which is when your immune system essentially attacks the cartilage within your joints throughout the body. Osteoarthritis (OA) is generally an age-related "wear and tear" degeneration of the joints. OA usually affects 1 or 2 joints (example "my knee or knees"). OA is treated with rest, ice or heat, NSAIDs (ex. Advil or Aleve) and exercise. If symptoms persist, cortisone injection are often helpful. When symptoms become refractory to conservative care then joint replacement can be considered.

What is the best course of treatment for femur fracture?

In general, in adults, most femur fractures are treated surgically, and usually with a rod inserted into the femur. Less frequently, a plate and screws can be used. Plates and READ MORE
In general, in adults, most femur fractures are treated surgically, and usually with a rod inserted into the femur. Less frequently, a plate and screws can be used. Plates and screws are sometimes used in distal femur fractures (close to the knee). In younger kids, casting is sometimes used, sometimes with flexible nails to help hold the fracture alignment. A rod is often used in teenagers as well. Hope this helps!

We believe my mother dislocated her shoulder. What should we do?

You should take your mother to the doctor immediately. She needs an X-ray and a good physical exam. If the shoulder is dislocated, it needs to be relocated ASAP. If it remains READ MORE
You should take your mother to the doctor immediately. She needs an X-ray and a good physical exam. If the shoulder is dislocated, it needs to be relocated ASAP. If it remains dislocated, it can cause serious long-term problems with the joint and sometimes with the nerves around the shoulder joint.

Steven M. DeLuca, DO

partial vs full joint replacment

A total knee replacement involves replacing all 3 compartments of the knee - medial (inside), lateral (outside) & patellofemoral (kneecap). A partial knee replacement involves READ MORE
A total knee replacement involves replacing all 3 compartments of the knee - medial (inside), lateral (outside) & patellofemoral (kneecap). A partial knee replacement involves replacing only one of these compartments - either the medial or the lateral or the patellofemoral.

If there is significant arthritis in more than 1 compartment of the knee, then a partial is not an option-it must be a total knee replacement. Traditionally, the ACL & often the PCL are cut out and “replaced” in a total knee replacement. The knee tends to feel “artificial”. These ligaments are preserved in a partial knee replacement. The knee feels more like a “normal” knee because of the preservation of these ligaments.

There is a small risk of needing additional surgery in a partial knee replacement if arthritis develops in the other compartments of the knee. This would require the partial being converted to a total knee replacement. If this does occur, it is usually possible to convert the partial to a total knee replacement using the same type of knee prosthesis that would be used in a normal total knee replacement (i.e. able to use primary knee replacement components...no need for revision knee replacement components). Patient satisfaction is high after total, partial and even conversion surgeries.

Steven M. DeLuca, DO