expert type icon EXPERT

Liz Lightstone

Nephrologist (Kidney Specialist)

Dr. Liz Lightstone is a nephrologist practicing in London, . Dr. Lightstone specializes in the care and treatment of the kidneys. As a nephrologist, Dr. Lightstone most typically treats conditions like kidney stones, chronic kidney disease, acute renal failure, polycystuc kidney disease, high blood pressure and more. Nephrologists are also experts on kidney transplantation and dialysis. They are usually referred to by primary care physicians for problems related to the kidneys, and while they can perform tests to diagnose kidney disorders, they do not perform surgeries.
Liz Lightstone
  • University of Cambridge
  • Accepting new patients

Can there be an increase in creatinine levels due to fever?

It depends on how poorly she was, whether she was dehydrated, and whether her blood pressure dropped. I would recheck a week or so later to ensure it has settled back to baseline. READ MORE
It depends on how poorly she was, whether she was dehydrated, and whether her blood pressure dropped. I would recheck a week or so later to ensure it has settled back to baseline.

Would you recommend natural medicine for a kidney disease patient?

The problem with "natural medicine" is that it is unregulated, untested and we have no idea what it does. I'm not sure what treatments have been recommended for him but they will READ MORE
The problem with "natural medicine" is that it is unregulated, untested and we have no idea what it does. I'm not sure what treatments have been recommended for him but they will all have been evaluated for the efficacy and tested extensively. Yes "ordinary" medicines can have side effects but his doctor should be able to explain any of these to him. Of course it entirely depends on what his kidney disease is and what treatments he needs. But just because something is "natural" does not mean it's safe or of benefit.

Can drinking a lot of water for a chronic kidney disease patient cause any major problem?

This is a tricky one. It very much depends on her kidney disease and how bad it is. Often with severe kidney problems you need to restrict your fluid intake but if hers is mild READ MORE
This is a tricky one. It very much depends on her kidney disease and how bad it is. Often with severe kidney problems you need to restrict your fluid intake but if hers is mild it may be fine. The real issue is why is she drinking so much - does she have excessive thirst, has her blood sugar and her calcium levels been checked? Why is she drinking more for "health" reasons? She won't harm her kidneys by drinking a lot but she might find she gets some swelling of her ankles if her kidneys can't cope with the volume and it's possible she could lower her sodium in her blood if she really drinks a lot.

Prognosis?

Kidney function at 14% of normal in a very elderly patient - I'd focus on excluding easily reversible causes (obstruction, infection etc) and then my main focus of care would be READ MORE
Kidney function at 14% of normal in a very elderly patient - I'd focus on excluding easily reversible causes (obstruction, infection etc) and then my main focus of care would be on symptom control (treat anaemia with erthyropoeitin if indicated), ensure not fluid overloaded, and establish her goals and wishes vis a vis end of life care. Generally I would not recommend dialysis in this age group as unlikely to prolong life but could adversely affect quality of life. I would be interested in rate of change of function. I would ensure kidney toxic drugs avoid (especially NSAIDs), advise regarding fluid status and be aware that an intercurrent illness (e.g. a cardiac event) likely to lead to end stage kidney failure. Long term prognosis guarded but can be meaningful if remains well.