expert type icon EXPERT

Neil F. Jones

Hand Surgeon

Dr. Neil F. Jones is a top Hand Surgeon in Orange, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. Neil F. Jones is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. Neil F. Jones is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. Neil F. Jones is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Orange, California, Dr. Neil F. Jones is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
Neil F. Jones
  • Orange, California
  • University of Oxford-Radcliffe Infirmary; University of Michigan-Surgery
  • Accepting new patients

My nephew is born with webbed hands. At what age can he do his surgery?

Depends on which fingers are involved. The middle-ring web space and ring-small web space are the most commonly involved. Usually we wait until at least 1 year and sometimes up READ MORE
Depends on which fingers are involved.
The middle-ring web space and ring-small web space are the most commonly involved. Usually we wait until at least 1 year and sometimes up to 2 years before releasing the middle -ring web space, because there is no difference in length of the 2 fingers and there is less chance of the webbing recurring. For ring-small web space, watch for any flexion of the shorter small finger. If so, may need to release between 6 months and 1 year. If the thumb is involved, may need to release between 3-6 months.

I have been diagnosed with trigger finger syndrome. What is the course of treatment for this?

A steroid injection into the base of your thumb has a 60-70% chance of relieving the triggering. Sometimes a second injection can be given if the first one does not help. If the READ MORE
A steroid injection into the base of your thumb has a 60-70% chance of relieving the triggering. Sometimes a second injection can be given if the first one does not help. If the triggering persists despite 1 or 2 injections, then outpatient surgery is required. Under local anesthesia, the portion of the flexor tendon sheath that is impeding the gliding of the tendon is released. Surgery takes less than 30 minutes.

Neil Jones, MD