expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Jason A. Talavera

Cardiologist

Dr. Jason Talavera is a cardiologist practicing in Everett, Washington . Dr. Talavera specializes in diagnosing, monitoring, and treating diseases or conditions of the heart and blood vessels and the cardiovascular system. These conditions include heart attacks, heart murmurs, coronary heart disease, and hypertension. Dr. Talavera also practices preventative medicine, helping patients maintain a heart-healthy life.
Dr. Jason A. Talavera
  • Everett, Washington
  • MD at the University of California
  • Accepting new patients

Can I have mitral valve prolapse when doctor can not hear heart murmur?

Yes, you absolutely can have mitral valve prolapse without hearing a murmur. There are many things that affect the ability to hear a murmur. The classic sound you would hear READ MORE
Yes, you absolutely can have mitral valve prolapse without hearing a murmur. There are many things that affect the ability to hear a murmur. The classic sound you would hear with mitral valve prolapse would be a click. It is best to have a repeat ultrasound from a cardiologist office or hospital system you trust and the reason for the study should be possible mitral valve prolapse. Hope this helps.


Jason Talavera, MD, FACC

Western Washington Cardiology

Western Washington Medical Group

Increasing resting heart rate, what is it?

It could mean a few things. Your resting heart rate at times can be a measure of your fitness level. In general the normal resting heart rate is between 60-100. Some people READ MORE
It could mean a few things. Your resting heart rate at times can be a measure of your fitness level. In general the normal resting heart rate is between 60-100. Some people who exercise regularly can have lower resting heart rates, sometimes as low as 40s-60. Heart rate can be a measure of infection, dehydration, or an abnormal heart rhythm. Usually while lying in bed, you're more in tune with your heart beat, so you can feel abnormal beats or faster beats. If your heart rate is between 60-100 beats, do not be concerned. If you're still worried, you can have a 24 hour Holter monitor which captures every beat of your heart and when you have symptoms, it will record them, and you can also get a feel for what your heart rate is doing when you are experiencing symptoms. I hope this helps.

Jason Talavera, MD, FACC