expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Michael A. Kellams

Anesthesiologist

Dr. Michael Kellams is an anesthesiologist practicing in Indianapolis, IN. Dr. Kellams ensures the safety of patients who are about to undergo surgery. Anestesiologists specialize in general anesthesia, which will (put the patient to sleep), sedation, which will calm the patient or make him or her unaware of the situation, and regional anesthesia, which just numbs a specific part of the body. As an anesthesiologist, Dr. Kellams also might help manage pain after an operation.
Dr. Michael A. Kellams
  • Indianapolis, IN
  • DO at Michigan State University
  • Accepting new patients

I'm having a nose job. Will the anesthesia affect my high blood pressure?

Many patients have hypertension that are undergoing surgery. As long as your anesthesiologist is aware and knows what medicine you take for it, there should be no problem undergoing READ MORE
Many patients have hypertension that are undergoing surgery. As long as your anesthesiologist is aware and knows what medicine you take for it, there should be no problem undergoing anesthesia and no problems with your blood pressure afterwards.

If my anesthesia is delivered in the back, can its traces mix in the spinal fluid?

That is actually the goal when delivering a spinal anesthetic. We place local anesthetic into the spinal fluid to achieve the desired numbness at the level the medication is placed READ MORE
That is actually the goal when delivering a spinal anesthetic. We place local anesthetic into the spinal fluid to achieve the desired numbness at the level the medication is placed and below. The local anesthetic is completely metabolized in the spinal fluid in 1-4 hours, depending on which anesthetic is used.

Can three epidurals be a problem?

There is no more risk with the 3rd as there would be if it’s your first. Many patients have undergone many epidural or spinal anesthetics. There is no evidence of a cumulative READ MORE
There is no more risk with the 3rd as there would be if it’s your first. Many patients have undergone many epidural or spinal anesthetics. There is no evidence of a cumulative effect.

Why was my son given anesthesia for a CT scan?

Yes. CT scans require complete stillness to get an adequate study. Children often have difficulty being still for a variety of reasons: they may be frightened by all the equipment READ MORE
Yes. CT scans require complete stillness to get an adequate study. Children often have difficulty being still for a variety of reasons: they may be frightened by all the equipment and strangers, they may be in pain, or simply because they are children and are a bundle of energy. In those situations the anesthetic is very brief and very safe.

What could be the symptoms of an anesthesia overdose? Is it possible?

The surgeon would not know if the anesthetic dose is too much, that is the anesthesiologists job. Anesthesiologists monitor all vital functions for the purpose of titrating the READ MORE
The surgeon would not know if the anesthetic dose is too much, that is the anesthesiologists job. Anesthesiologists monitor all vital functions for the purpose of titrating the correct amount of anesthetic medications for any given patient. No two patients are alike and therefore no two anesthetics are alike.

Is anesthesia in low blood pressure patients risky?

Root canals are typically done with local anesthetic. Local anesthetic should have no effect on blood pressure.

I need to undergo a nail removal treatment. Will anesthesia have to be administered for this?

This is a procedure that commonly is done in the office with local anesthesia.

I have heard the anesthesia given during C-section can later cause back pain. Is it true?

Not likely. C sections are usually done with spinal or epidural anesthesia. The only possibility for pain from the anesthetic would be due to bruising at the site of injection READ MORE
Not likely. C sections are usually done with spinal or epidural anesthesia. The only possibility for pain from the anesthetic would be due to bruising at the site of injection which would cause local tenderness that would resolve like any bruise after several days. There have never been any case reports of long term back injury from spinal or epidural anesthesia. In fact, epidurals are commonly used to treat low back pain caused by disc disease or spinal stenosis

What should I expect during general anesthesia?

You will meet your anesthesiologist prior to your surgery. That’s when he/she will interview you about your medical history and explain what is planned for your anesthetic and READ MORE
You will meet your anesthesiologist prior to your surgery. That’s when he/she will interview you about your medical history and explain what is planned for your anesthetic and what to expect afterwards. You will then have an opportunity to ask any questions you might have. Once all of your questions are answered, your consents are signed, and the Preop nurse has you ready (changed into a hospital gown, IV placed), you will then be taken to the operating room. Once in the operating room you will be connected to various monitors so the anesthesiologist can monitor your vital functions. These include EKG, blood pressure, and pulse oximetry (a lighted clip on your finger). The anesthesiologist will then instruct you to take a few deep breaths of pure oxygen and while you are doing so will put medicine into your IV to induce anesthesia. It works really fast. To you, it will seem like you were taking a deep breath and the next thing you know you are waking up in the recovery room with a new nurse sitting next to you and the surgery is over.

Can anesthesia be administered to a patient with diabetes?

Patients often have diabetes, or high blood pressure, or heart disease, or a combination or myriad of other diseases when they present for surgery. Anesthesiologists take a thorough READ MORE
Patients often have diabetes, or high blood pressure, or heart disease, or a combination or myriad of other diseases when they present for surgery. Anesthesiologists take a thorough history and physical and tailor the anesthetic to the patient based on the type of surgery and the patient's medical history. Hundreds of thousands of diabetic patients successfully undergo surgical procedures everyday. Communicate with your surgeon and anesthesiologist and you can be confident in receiving the best care to meet your needs.