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Dr. Roxanne Chang

Pediatrician

Dr. Roxanne Chang is a pediatrician practicing in Torrance, California. Dr. Chang is a doctor who specializes in the health care of children. As a pedicatrician, Dr. Chang diagnoses and treats infections, injuries, diseases and other disorders in children. Pediatricians typically work with infants, children, teenagers and young adults up to age 21. They practice medical care as well as preventative health care. Dr. Chang can oversee and manage the physical, mental and emotional health of their patients.
Dr. Roxanne Chang
  • Torrance, California
  • Harvard University
  • Accepting new patients

My second child is 14 months old and hasn't taken her first steps. Is something wrong?

Children grow and develop at very different speeds. Time to independent walking is often a combination of temperament, physical size, and just who the child is. Early walkers READ MORE
Children grow and develop at very different speeds. Time to independent walking is often a combination of temperament, physical size, and just who the child is. Early walkers tend to be curious, outgoing, fearless "go-getter" types who are slimmer and smaller and size, while later walkers might be more "chill" personality types, cautious, or larger in size. Of course, these are no absolutes and children are unique individuals. Time to independent walking, as long as it is within normal range (about 9-16 months), does not predict future athleticism or physical capabilities.

As long as your child has met previous gross motor milestones (rolling over, sitting, crawling, etc.), your pediatrician has not had any prior concerns about your child being too floppy or stiff, and your child is now pulling to a stand, beginning to cruise (walking while holding onto furniture), and consistently making developmental progress, I would not worry. Continue to encourage and offer plenty of opportunities to cruise and move about on the floor, and monitor her progress.

If your child has not met milestones previously, has had concerns for being too floppy or stiff, is not yet pulling to a stand or beginning to cruise, is still not walking independently by 16 months, or shows any signs of developmental regression, consult with your pediatrician for a detailed assessment. Depending on what your pediatrician finds during the examination, you may need further laboratory testing, specialty referral, or a referral for a formal developmental assessment with early childhood developmental specialists, including OT or PT.

Newborn constipation, what can I do?

First of all, so sorry for the delay in answering this question. There was a problem with seeing them in my inbox for some reason. Your baby is settling into her regular stooling READ MORE
First of all, so sorry for the delay in answering this question. There was a problem with seeing them in my inbox for some reason.


Your baby is settling into her regular stooling pattern now. While many breastfed infants seem to poop after every feed, it is also normal to have infrequent bowel movements, up to once every three days...even a week! As long as the stool is soft and not small, hard, and pebbly, she is not constipated.


To help your baby have more comfortable bowel movements and less gas, try massaging and stroking her tummy a few times a day, in a clockwise fashion. This helps to move gas bubbles in an outward fashion, and also helps to optimize intestinal motility. I'm a big fan of infant massage. You can do this with her regular lotion, or something like grapeseed or olive oil, which usually do not cause reactions on skin. Avoid any fragranced products. If she is grunting and straining to stool, apply some pressure to her feet to help her out so she has something to push against-- it is hard to expel stool on one's back.


Mylicon (chemical name simethicone) is safe for newborns, it just does not always work in every baby. It is not absorbed into the system, but stays in the intestines, and works by decreasing the surface tension of gas bubbles, essentially popping existing ones and preventing new ones from forming. It will not increase constipation.


If your baby is truly continuing to have constipation (hard pebbly stools), now that she is older, you can try some prune juice (1-2 oz) added to her formula. I prefer not to do this in babies less than 1 months old. Lactulose can also be added to formula, but should be discussed with your pediatrician.


Glycerin suppositories can be used occasionally when a baby has hard impacted stool, however, this should not be used routinely as it can alter the body's natural rhythms to expel stool. A dependence on rectal stimulation for stooling can develop.


If your baby had delayed passage of meconium at birth (should pass within first 48 hours of life) and is having ongoing, recurrent ,or chronic issues with constipation, consult your pediatrician to discuss whether or not something more serious might be going on, such as a condition called Hirschsprung Disease, in which the nerves are not developed properly in the colon, so that it fails to relax and expel stool properly. Also consult with your pediatrician if your baby has ribbon-like stools (very narrow in diameter), or is not growing or developing as she should. Seek urgent medical attention if your baby every has bloody stool, is vomiting, or has significant abdominal distention.


I hope she is better now!

My baby blinks excessively. What's wrong?

Blinking is a normal reflex that regulates tears to protect the eye from dryness. It also protects the eye from bright light, and anything that comes toward it, such as a gust READ MORE
Blinking is a normal reflex that regulates tears to protect the eye from dryness. It also protects the eye from bright light, and anything that comes toward it, such as a gust of sand or a finger.

If your child is truly experiencing excessive blinking, bring him in for an examination by your pediatrician. Excessive blinking can be caused by problems with the eyelids, front part of the eye, occasional exotropia (turning out of the eye), stress, or any other discomfort. Older children may blink excessively if they need glasses (refractive error, attempt to see more clearly), or as a tic manifestation. While tics can happen in infants, it is extremely rare. Isolated blinking tics tend to be transient, resolve in a few weeks, and do not signify an underlying neurological problem. No brain imaging needs to be done. Children with multiple tics (other movements and/or vocalizations) should see a pediatric neurologist for further evaluation.

Your pediatrician can examine your baby's eye to see if the conjunctiva (membrane covering eyeball) might be irritated and pink or red, and if so, ascertain the cause of the irritation. Your pediatrician may also refer your baby to see an ophthalmologist to look for other causes in the eye.