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Donald W. Hill

Hematologist-Oncologist

Donald W. Hill, MD, FACP, is an established hematologist/oncologist working at Tri Valley Cancer Research in Casa Grande, Arizona. He received his medical degree in 1982 at the University of Texas Medical School at Houston and served his Hematology and Oncology fellowship at the University of New Mexico. Dr. Hill is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and is a professional member of the American Society of Clinical Oncology. In addition, he is a fellow of the American College of Physicians.
Donald W. Hill
  • Casa Grande, Arizona
  • Accepting new patients

How many types of non-Hodgkin lymphoma exist?

There are about 30 subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, broken down into 2 major categories: B-cell lymphomas and T-cell lymphomas, with the vast majority of these cancers falling READ MORE
There are about 30 subtypes of non-Hodgkin lymphomas, broken down into 2 major categories: B-cell lymphomas and T-cell lymphomas, with the vast majority of these cancers falling into the realm of B-cell malignancies. Non-Hodgkin lymphomas present with a myriad of clinical risks to afflicted patients, ranging from fast growing and highly lethal diseases to slower growing and more indolent cancers that are less aggressive.

What tests are performed during a bone marrow transplant consultation?

Modern terminology now generally refers to a bone marrow transplant procedure as a stem cell transplant, as it's a more accurate description of the medical treatment. For consideration READ MORE
Modern terminology now generally refers to a bone marrow transplant procedure as a stem cell transplant, as it's a more accurate description of the medical treatment. For consideration of a stem cell transplant, there are several questions to be addressed.

Can leukemia cause a rash on the legs?

It could be a mutitude of things including chemotherapy drug rash, petechial eruption from low platelet counts, leukemic infiltration in the skin, infection from virus, bacteria, READ MORE
It could be a mutitude of things including chemotherapy drug rash, petechial eruption from low platelet counts, leukemic infiltration in the skin, infection from virus, bacteria, or fungus. Make sure your grandson visits his oncologist! I wish the boy well.