Healthy Living

How Is Gastroenteritis Diagnosed?

People can reduce their risks for gastroenteritis by frequently washing their hands, disinfection of contaminated surfaces using chlorine-based bleach cleansers, and apt cleaning of soiled clothing items. If you think that the food or water you’re about to take is contaminated, then be sure to avoid taking it. Rotavirus gastritis can be prevented by vaccination as well.

Gastroenteritis

How Is Gastroenteritis Diagnosed?

Key Takeaways

 Endoscopy involves examination of the upper digestive system. During this process, your doctor gently passes a flexible tube consisting of an endoscope down the throat, esophagus, stomach, and finally into the small intestine. By means of the endoscope, your physician might identify signs of inflammation. If any suspicious symptoms are identified, the small parts of the affected tissues can be removed for further examination tests.
 X-ray Tests: Also referred to as gastrointestinal tests, X-rays check and produce detailed images of the patient’s esophagus, small intestine, and stomach. To enhance the visibility of ulcerous wounds, you’ll have to swallow whitish metallic liquids that fully coat your digestive tract, preventing further damages from the X-ray radiations.
 H. pylori Tests: These tests are dependent on the severity of your condition. H. pylori can be detected through blood, breath, or stool tests. For the breast test, your doctor will give you a certain fluid containing radioactive carbon, which will then be broken down by the H. pylori bacteria in the stomach. Later, you’ll be required to blow into a bag, which is completely sealed. If you have H. pylori, the breath specimen will certainly contain radioactive carbon.

Gastroenteritis should be diagnosed by a doctor on the basis of prevalent symptoms and the patient’s medical history. Rotavirus infections can also be diagnosed through laboratory tests on blood, stool, and breath samples. Additional tests can be done to identify any other underlying conditions that could be responsible for gastritis.

Though your doctor may identify gastritis after carefully observing your previous medical history and conducting an in-depth physical examination, you may also be subjected to a series of supplementary tests to determine the precise cause. Such tests may include:

ü  Endoscopy involves examination of the upper digestive system. During this process, your doctor gently passes a flexible tube consisting of an endoscope down the throat, esophagus, stomach, and finally into the small intestine. By means of the endoscope, your physician might identify signs of inflammation. If any suspicious symptoms are identified, the small parts of the affected tissues can be removed for further examination tests.

ü  X-ray Tests: Also referred to as gastrointestinal tests, X-rays check and produce detailed images of the patient’s esophagus, small intestine, and stomach. To enhance the visibility of ulcerous wounds, you’ll have to swallow whitish metallic liquids that fully coat your digestive tract, preventing further damages from the X-ray radiations.

ü  H. pylori Tests: These tests are dependent on the severity of your condition. H. pylori can be detected through blood, breath, or stool tests. For the breast test, your doctor will give you a certain fluid containing radioactive carbon, which will then be broken down by the H. pylori bacteria in the stomach. Later, you’ll be required to blow into a bag, which is completely sealed. If you have H.pylori, the breath specimen will certainly contain radioactive carbon.

What Causes Gastroenteritis?

There are several factors that cause gastroenteritis:

  • Certain viruses like adenovirus, norovirus, rotavirus, and astrovirus.
  • Chemicals. Poisonous substances such as lead can trigger the occurrence of gastritis.
  • Some bacteria like Campylobacter bacterium, for instance, can cause gastroenteritis.
  • Bacterial toxins. Bacteria can’t cause the illness on their own. However, the poisonous by-products they contain can contaminate water or food. Staphylococcal bacterial strains release harmful toxins that can trigger gastritis.
  • Some antibiotic medications can cause gastritis in people having greater risks for the illness.
  • Parasites like Cryptosporidium, Entamoeba histolytica, and Giardia lamblia can also lead to gastroenteritis.

Can Gastroenteritis Be Prevented?

People can reduce their risk for gastroenteritis by frequently washing their hands, disinfection of contaminated surfaces using chlorine-based bleach cleansers, and apt cleaning of soiled clothing items. If you think the food or water you’re about to take is contaminated, then be sure to avoid taking it. Rotavirus gastritis can be prevented by vaccination as well.

Gastroenteritis Treatments

The type of treatment you’ll receive depends on the specific cause of your condition. However, the commonest are:

ü  Antibiotic prescriptions

ü  Plenty of fluids

ü  Intravenous fluid replacements

ü  Parasitic inhibitors

ü  Avoidance of anti-vomiting medications unless prescribed by your doctor, since such drugs will keep gastroenteritis-related infections inside the body.  They will consistently stimulate its severity and should, therefore, be avoided.

ü  Medications focused on preventing extreme dehydration. This form of treatment is often administered at home. Your doctor might give guidance on the kind of fluids you should take. Be sure to observe the provided instructions for an improved condition and quicker recovery.