MGUS

1 What is Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS)?

A condition in which an abnormal protein such as monoclonal or M protein is in the blood is called Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS).

It causes no problems and can be produced by plasma cells a type of white blood cells. MGUS can progress over the years to other disorders like kinds of blood cancer and can be associated with other diseases.

If the level of M protein doesn't increase there is no need for treatment.

2 Symptoms

People with monoclonal gammopathy of of undetermined significance (MGUS) generally don't experience signs or symptoms.

Numbness or tingling that can occur with abnormal protein is a nerve problem that can happen to some people.

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3 Causes

The cause of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is unknown.

When plasma cells in your bone marrow produce an abnormal protein which is monoclonal protein, you will have monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Plasma cells that are a type of white cells can be found in our bone marrow and can produce antibodies to help our body fight infections.

The M protein isn't harmful but if there’s too much M protein it can remove healthy cells in your bone marrow and damage other tissues. Also, there are environmental triggers and genetic changes that can cause monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

4 Making a Diagnosis

There are test that needs to be taken to diagnose if you have monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS). Your doctor may refer you to a hematologist that specializes in blood disorders.

Bring a notebook and list down all the things that you need like:

  • the medications and supplements and vitamins that you are taking;
  • the symptoms that you are experiencing;
  • the major stresses in your life and the previous changes in your life.

Ask a loved one if he/she could come with you to support and at the same time helps you in remembering relevant information.

You may ask your doctor these questions:

  • What is the cause of this?
  • What tests do I need?
  • Do these tests require special preparation?
  • Is this temporary or lifetime?
  • Are there any treatments available right now?
  • Do I have to change my lifestyle?
  • How often will I have follow up visits?

Your doctor may ask you these questions:

  • What symptoms are you experiencing?
  • Do you have a family history?
  • Have you ever had a blood clot or have you been diagnosed with cancer before?
  • Do you have osteoporosis?
  • Do you have a broken bone in your body?

Your doctor may recommend some tests for you such as: Serum Protein Electrophoresis that separates your proteins into 5 parts; Free light chain assay; blood test; urine test to check if there are any abnormal proteins that can be seen in your urine; X-rays to check for bone deformities; bone marrow test, the doctor will get a small piece of your bone marrow.

5 Treatment

Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) doesn't require treatment.

Your doctor will likely ask you to have checkups to monitor your body maybe twice a year. There is a risk-assessment model which can predict the multiple myeloma. If you have bone loss and cause monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance at the same time, there is a treatment called bisphosphonates to increase the density of your bones.

6 Prevention

As of today, there is no prevention or to stop the progression of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) because its cause is still unknown.

7 Alternative and Homeopathic Remedies

Homeopathic remedy like Curcumin is the major active compound in the Indian spice Turmeric that has preventive effects for monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

A number of patients are found to have a light chain response to curcumin.

8 Lifestyle and Coping

Here are a few suggestions to cope with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS):

  • have a healthy lifestyle,
  • eat nutritious foods such as fruits and vegetable,
  • exercise regularly,
  • do not stress yourself too much,
  • control what you are doing to your life,
  • rest well and get enough sleep,
  • always have a follow up visit with your doctor to see your condition.

9 Risks and Complications

There are several risks and complications associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS).

There are risks of having monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) such as:

  • As you get older mostly if you reach 85 years of age and above,
  • black people are more at risk than white people,
  • this is common in men rather than in women,
  • if you have a family history of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

Your doctor may know who has the greater risk because of the amount of M protein in your body.

Fractures and blood clots are two examples of complications for monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

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