Asmanex HFA

1 What is Asmanex HFA?

Brand: Asmanex HFA, Asmanex Twist

Generic: Mometasone furoate

Mometasone is a corticosteroid drug that is used as prophylactic therapy for asthma attacks in patients 4 years of age and older. It is also used as a maintenance treatment for asthma symptoms in patients 12 years of age and older. Inhaled mometasone works by inhibiting certain cells in the lungs and breathing passages from releasing substances that cause asthma symptoms.

This product is available in aerosol powder and powder.

2 What to Know Before Using

Tell to your doctor if you are allergic to mometasone or to any other medications.

This medicine is safe for both children and elderly. However, safety and effectiveness have not been established in children younger than 4 years of age.

Pregnancy category C – Tell your doctor first if you are currently expecting a baby or if you are planning to become pregnant before taking this medication.

There are no adequate studies whether mometasone can pass through breast milk or if it could cause harmful effects to the infant. Discuss with your doctor if you are breastfeeding a baby.

Taking this medicine with Pixantrone is usually not recommended, but may be required in some cases. Also, taking this medicine with Ketoconazole may cause an increased risk of certain side effects, but using both drugs may be the best treatment for you. If both medicines are prescribed together, your doctor may change the dose or frequency of one or both of your medicines.

Some medical conditions can interact with this medication.

Tell your doctor if you have any of the following conditions:

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3 Proper Usage

Inhaled mometasone is used with a special inhaler and should be used as directed by a physician.

Make sure to take the prescribed dosage only. Do not stop using this medication without telling your doctor. Medicine compliance is very important to avoid asthma attacks.

To use the Twisthaler®:

  • When you first open the foil pouch of this medicine, write down the date on the cap label. This medicine is good for only 45 days once the pouch is opened.
  • The Twisthaler® has a dose counter with it. It keeps track of how many more times you can use the inhaler before you need to open a new one. When the dose counter reaches ""00"", the Twisthaler® will lock itself. Do not use the Twisthaler® and return it to your pharmacy or doctor if the dose counter is not working correctly.
  • Remove the cap while the inhaler is in upright position to make sure you get the right amount of medicine with each dose.
  • Hold the Twisthaler® upright and twist the cap in a counterclockwise direction to open it. The dose counter should change to a lower number when you take off the cap. The arrow on the Twisthaler® should be pointing to the dose counter.
  • You should breathe out fully when inhaling this medication. Make sure to put the mouthpiece fully into your mouth and close your lips around it. Do not block the mouthpiece with your teeth or tongue.
  • Breathe in through your mouth as deeply as you can until you have taken a full deep breath.
  • Take the Twisthaler® out of your mouth. Hold your breath for about 10 seconds, and then breathe out gradually.
  • Do not breathe out into the inhaler.
  • Wipe the mouthpiece dry with a cloth or tissue. Do not wash it with water. Put the cap back on immediately and twist it in a clockwise direction. You should hear a "click" when the cap is fully closed.
  • Gargle and rinse your mouth with water after each dose; this will help prevent hoarseness, throat irritation, and infection in the mouth. Do not swallow the water after rinsing.

To use the Asmanex® HFA inhaler:

  • This medicine comes in 2 strengths. Your doctor will choose which dosage strength is best for you.
  • The Asmanex® HFA aerosol canister provides about 124 inhalations, depending on the size of the canister your doctor ordered.
  • The Asmanex® HFA inhaler has a small window on the side with numbers showing. This is the dose counter. It keeps track of how many more times you can use the inhaler before you need to open a new one.
  • Before using this medicine, remove the cap from the mouthpiece.
  • When you use the inhaler for the first time, or if you have not used it in a while, test or prime it by releasing 4 tests sprays into the air, away from the face.
  • Shake well before each spray.
  • To inhale this medicine, breathe out fully, trying to get as much air out of the lungs as possible. Put the mouthpiece fully into your mouth and close your lips around it. Do not block the mouthpiece with your teeth or tongue.
  • Breathe in through your mouth as deeply as you can until you have taken a full deep breath.
  • Do not use Asmanex® HFA canister or actuator with any other medicines.
  • Rinse your mouth with water after each dose. Do not swallow the water after rinsing.

Dosing

The dose of this medicine varies for different patients. Take mometasone exactly as prescribed by your doctor.

Prophylactic management for an asthma attack:

  • Inhaled corticosteroids and bronchodilators:
    • Adults, teenagers, and children 12 years of age and older—One puff once a day, at bedtime. Each puff contains 220 micrograms (mcg) of mometasone. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 440 mcg per day.
    • Children 4 to 11 years of age—One puff once a day, at bedtime. Each puff contains 110 mcg of mometasone.
    • Children younger than 4 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • Oral corticosteroids:
    • Adults, teenagers, and children 12 years of age and older—Two puffs two times a day, in the evening. Each puff contains 220 micrograms (mcg) of mometasone. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 880 mcg per day.
    • Children 4 to 11 years of age — One puff once a day, in the evening. Each puff contains 110 mcg of mometasone.
    • Children younger than 4 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

Prophylactic management for an asthma attack (HFA):

  • Inhaled corticosteroids:
    • Adults, teenagers, and children 12 years of age and older—Two puffs two times a day (in the morning and in the evening). Each puff contains 100 or 200 micrograms (mcg) of mometasone. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 400 to 800 mcg per day.
    • Children younger than 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.
  • Oral corticosteroids:
    • Adults, teenagers, and children 12 years of age and older—Two puffs two times a day, (in the morning and in the evening). Each puff contains 200 micrograms (mcg) of mometasone. Your doctor may increase your dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 800 mcg per day.
    • Children younger than 12 years of age—Use and dose must be determined by your doctor.

If you miss a dose of this medicine, take it as soon as possible. However, if it is near for your next dose, skip the missed dose and start again to your regular dosing schedule. Do not take a double dose to make up for a missed one.

Store the medication in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep out of reach of children. Do not throw the canister onto a fire even if it is empty. Do not keep expired medications. Ask your health providers about the best way to discard of the used inhaler.

4 Precautions To Take

Check with your doctor on regular visits to monitor your progress with the medication.

Inhaled mometasone reduce the number and severity of asthma attacks when it is used daily. However, it will not treat an asthma attack that has already in progress. You should use another medicine for relief of an asthma attack that has already started. If you do not have another medicine to use for an attack or if you have any questions about this, check with your doctor.

Tell your doctor or seek for medical help if:

  • If you experience allergic reaction from this medicine.
  • If you or your child developed mouth sores or white patches in the mouth or throat while taking this medication.
  • If you or your child's symptoms do not improve after using this medicine for 2 weeks or if they become worse.
  • If you or your child have a huge reduction in your peak flow when measured as directed by your doctor.
  • If you or your child have more than one of these symptoms while you are using this medicine since this medication can affect your adrenal gland: skin darkening, diarrhea, dizziness, fainting, loss of appetite, mental depression, nausea, skin rash, unusual tiredness or weakness, or weight loss.
  • If you or your child are having a cough, breathing problem, or wheezing after using this medicine. Use a short acting inhaler right away to treat your symptoms.
  • If you are having blurring of vision, difficulty in reading, or any other change in vision occurs during or after treatment. Your doctor may want you or your child to have your eyes checked by an ophthalmologist.
  • If you are breathing or wheezing had worsened because this medicine may cause paradoxical bronchospasm which is considered a life-threatening condition.

Carrying a medical identification card stating that you or your child is using this medicine may help to save your life. By wearing medical ID, asthma sufferers in the midst of an attack can show their medical ID to others who will gather the right information such as diagnosis, emergency contacts, or whether the patient may need additional medicine during an emergency.

If you are switching from an oral corticosteroid to this medicine, you should follow your doctor’s directions carefully.

This medicine may decrease bone mineral density when used for a long time. Low bone mineral density can cause weak bones or osteoporosis. If you have any questions about this, ask your doctor.

Talk to your doctor if you are taking any other medication.

5 Potential Side Effects

Check with your doctor immediately if any of the following side effects occur:

  • Body aches or pain
  • Cold or flu-like symptoms
  • Congestion
  • Cough
  • Dryness or soreness of the throat
  • Abdominal or stomach pain
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever or chills
  • Loss of appetite
  • Lower back or side pain
  • Nausea
  • White patches inside the nose or mouth

Less serious side effects

  • Difficulty with moving
  • Discouragement
  • Feeling sad or empty
  • Headache
  • Increased abdominal or stomach pain and cramping during menstrual periods
  • Irritability
  • Lack of appetite
  • Loss of interest or pleasure
  • Muscle or joint pain
  • Muscle pain or stiffness
  • Nasal burning and irritation
  • Stomach discomfort following meals
  • Stuffy or runny nose
  • Tiredness
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Trouble sleeping
  • Unexplained runny nose or sneezing
  • Upset stomach
  • Accidental injury
  • Bladder pain
  • Bloated
  • Bloody mucus or unexplained nosebleeds
  • Bloody or cloudy urine
  • Chest congestion
  • Difficult, burning, or painful urination
  • Excess air or gas in stomach or intestines
  • Frequent urge to urinate
  • Full feeling
  • General feeling of discomfort or illness
  • Lower back or side pain
  • Menstrual changes
  • Passing gas
  • Post-procedure pain
  • Shivering
  • Sweating
  • Unusual tiredness or weakness
  • Vomiting

Not all side effects are listed above. If you notice any other effects, check with your healthcare professional.

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