Diabeta

1 What is Diabeta?

Brand: Diabeta, Glycron, Glynase Pres-Tab, Micronase

Generic: Glyburide (Oral Route)

Glyburide or Diabeta is a sulfonylurea used for the treatment of hyperglycemia secondary to type 2 diabetes. Chronic high blood sugar can lead to serious health problems in the future.

Proper diet is the first step in managing type 2 diabetes, but often drugs are needed to help your body. This drug causes your pancreas to secrete more insulin into the blood stream.

This drug may be used alone or with another oral drug such as metformin. This drug requires a prescription.

2 What to Know Before Using

Before taking this drug, the risks and benefits for your body should be discussed with your healthcare provider.

Inform your healthcare provider for any allergic reactions to these drugs or any other drugs, foods, dyes, preservatives, or animals.

Carefully read the label of non-prescription drugs for any possible allergic reaction or contraindications.

Studies in children regarding the relationship of age to the effects of glyburide have not been performed while safety and efficacy have not been established.

Studies in the elderly have not demonstrated any geriatric-specific problems that would limit the utility of glyburide. Adjustments in the dose of the elderly may be required since they are more likely to have age-related liver or kidney problems.

Adverse effects have been reported in animal studies but studies in pregnant women or animals are still inadequate. Infant risk is still undetermined when using this drug during breastfeeding.

Discuss with your healthcare professional about the potential risks and benefits of taking this drug while breastfeeding.

Drugs should not be taken together to prevent any interactions but in necessary cases inquire your healthcare provider regarding the adjustments in dosage or any other necessary precautions to prevent any unwanted side effects.

Inform your healthcare professional if you are taking any other prescription or nonprescription drugs. Intake of specific food or using alcohol or tobacco with this drug is associated with an increased risk of certain side effects.

Your healthcare professional can give you special instructions about the use of food, alcohol, or tobacco.

Inform your healthcare provider for any other medical problems such as:

  • Alcohol intoxication
  • Underactive adrenal glands
  • Underactive pituitary gland
  • Undernourished condition
  • Weakened physical condition
  • Any other condition that causes low blood sugar
  • Diabetic ketoacidosis
  • Type I diabetes
  • Fever
  • Infection
  • Surgery
  • Trauma
  • Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency
  • Heart disease
  • Kidney disease
  • Liver disease

3 Proper Usage

The special meal plan your healthcare professional gave you must be followed since it is an important part of controlling your condition, and is necessary if the drug is to work properly.

Regular exercise and test for sugar in your blood or urine are also recommended. The dose of this drug will be variable for different patients.

The directions on the label or the prescription by your healthcare professional should be followed. The dosage of this drug you take depends on the medical problem for which you are using this drug.

Adults with type 2 diabetes are initially given 2.5 to 5 milligrams once a day was taken with breakfast or the first main meal. Your healthcare professional may adjust your dose if necessary.

The dose must not exceed 20 mg per day. Use and dose in children must be determined by your healthcare professional.

Adults with type 2 diabetes are initially given 1.5 to 3 milligrams once a day was taken with breakfast or the first main meal. Your healthcare professional may adjust your dose if necessary.

The dose is must not exceed 12 mg per day. Use and dose in children must be determined by your healthcare professional. A missed dose should be taken as soon as possible.

However, skip the missed dose and go back to your regular dosing schedule if it is almost time for your next dose.

Store the drug in a closed container at room temperature, away from heat, moisture, and direct light. Keep from freezing. Keep out of the reach of children.

Dispose any outdated or expired drugs and ask your healthcare professional for the proper disposal of the drugs.

4 Precautions to Take

Regular visits should be made to your healthcare provider to track your progress and to monitor the effectiveness of the drug.

Report any unwanted or unusual effects to your healthcare professional.

Avoid the necessary medications and activities that are advised against you to prevent unwanted effects.

Check with your healthcare professional before you take any other prescription or nonprescription drugs, and herbal or vitamin supplements.

5 Potential Side Effects

Side effects may vary for each individual and prompt medical attention should be given if they occur.

Seek advice from your healthcare professional immediately if you experience any unusual symptoms such as:

  • the difficulty with swallowing
  • dizziness
  • fast heartbeat
  • hives
  • itching
  • puffiness or swelling of the eyelids or around the eyes, face, lips or tongue
  • shortness of breath
  • skin rash
  • tightness in the chest
  • unusual tiredness or weakness
  • wheezing
  • abdominal or stomach pain
  • chills
  • clay-colored stools
  • dark urine
  • diarrhea
  • fever
  • headache
  • light-colored stools
  • loss of appetite
  • nausea and vomiting
  • rash
  • unpleasant breath odor
  • upper right abdominal pain
  • vomiting of blood
  • yellow eyes and skin
  • agitation
  • back, leg or stomach pains
  • bleeding gums
  • blood in the urine or stools
  • bloody, black or tarry stools
  • blurred vision
  • change in near or distance vision
  • chest pain
  • coma
  • confusion
  • convulsions
  • a cough or hoarseness
  • decreased urine output
  • depression
  • difficulty in focusing eyes
  • the difficulty with breathing fast or irregular heartbeat
  • fluid-filled skin
  • blisters
  • general body swelling
  • high fever
  • hostility
  • increased thirst
  • irritability
  • itching of the skin
  • large, hive-like swelling on the face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet or sex organs
  • lethargy
  • lower back or side pain
  • muscle pain or cramps
  • muscle twitching
  • nosebleeds
  • painful or difficult urination
  • pale skin
  • pinpoint red spots on the skin
  • rapid weight gain
  • seizures
  • sensitivity to the sun
  • skin thinness
  • a sore throat
  • sores, ulcers or white spots on the lips or in the mouth
  • stupor
  • swelling of the face, ankles or hands
  • swollen or painful glands
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • symptoms of overdose such as anxiety
  • cold sweats
  • cool, pale skin
  • increased hunger
  • nervousness
  • nightmares
  • shakiness
  • slurred speech

Some side effects may occur that usually do not need medical attention. As your body adjusts to the drug, the side effects will slowly disappear.

Ask your healthcare professional about ways to prevent or reduce some of these side effects.

If any of the following side effects persists or are inconvenient, or if you notice any other effects, or if you have any questions about them, consult with your health care professional.

Report any side effects to the FDA hotline at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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