Menhibrix

1 What is Menhibrix?

Brand: Menhibrix

Generic: Meningococcal Vaccine And Haemophilus B Vaccine

Brand name:

Menhibrix.

Meningococcal vaccine and haemophilus vaccine is used to prevent infection caused by bacteria called Neisseria meningitides and Haemophilus influenza type B (Hib).

It is an active immunizing agent works by stimulating your immune system to produce antibodies (protection) against the bacteria and so your body will now fight against the infections.

The vaccine will not treat an active infection that has already developed in the body.

It may not provide protection from disease in every person.

It is recommended to be used in children between 6 months to 18 months of age.

It is given by your doctor or under his/her supervision and is available in the form of powder for solution.

2 What to Know Before Using

Before starting the treatment your doctor should be informed about condition such as,

Allergy

Inform your doctor if you are allergic to any food, preservatives, dyes, or had an allergic reaction when you used this drug before.

Children

There are no adequate studies done which proves its safety in infants younger than 6months of age and in children 19 months to 16 years of age. Safety and efficacy have not been established.

Elderly

There are no adequate studies done which prove its safety and efficacy in adults above 65 years of age.

Pregnancy

It is not known if it can harm an unborn baby or not. There are no adequate studies done to prove its safety during pregnancy.

Breast Feeding

It is not known if it can pass into breastmilk or not. If you are using it while nursing, discuss the potential risks with your doctor.

Drug Interactions

Meningococcal vaccine and Haemophilus vaccine may interact with other drugs.

Your doctor should be informed of any other medicines which you are taking. He may want to change the dosage or drug.

Some of them are listed below,

  • Azathioprine (Imuran)
  • Etanercept (Enbrel)
  • Leflunomide (Arava)
  • Basiliximab (Simulect)
  • Cyclosporine (Sandimmune, Neoral, Gengraf)
  • Muromonab CD3 (Orthoclone)
  • Mycophenolate mofetil (cellcept)
  • Sirolimus (Rapamune)
  • Tacrolimus (Prograf).

Other Medical Conditions

Several other conditions may reduce its effectiveness.

Make sure you inform your doctor of conditions such as,

  • Child has a weak immune system caused by disease (cancer, HIV, or AIDS), or by taking certain medicines such as steroids.
  • Premature birth
  • Guillain Barré syndrome (within 6 weeks after receiving a vaccine that contains tetanus).
Have a question aboutHaemophilus Infections?Ask a doctor now

3 Proper Usage

It is given as an injection into your muscle by your doctor or nurse or trained health professional.

This vaccine is given in a series of 4 shots. The first shot is usually given when the child is between 6 and 8 weeks old. The booster shots are then given at 4 months, 6 months, and 12 to 15 months of age.

Your child should receive the doses in same series. If your child does miss a dose of this vaccine, make another appointment as soon as possible.

4 Precautions to Take

Your doctor should check your child daily progress at regular visits.

This vaccine can cause serious allergic reaction.

Inform your doctor immediately if your child has

  • cough,
  • rash,
  • itching skin,
  • large, hive-like swelling on face, eyelids, lips, tongue, throat, hands, legs, feet, sex organs,
  • trouble breathing,
  • lightheadedness,
  • dizziness,
  • fainting.

Your doctor should be informed of any other vaccine your child has received recently.

Inform your doctor if your child has any immune system problem or other illnesses as it may not work as well in patients who have immune system problems or are taking medicine that suppresses the immune system, such as corticosteroids, chemotherapy or radiations

Your child may experience

  • fainting,
  • blurred vision,
  • numbness or tingling in arms, hands, or feet,
  • seizures.

Inform your child’s doctor that your child received the vaccine if a severe infection occurs during 2 weeks after the vaccine is given.

5 Potential Side Effects

All medicines have some side effects. Some people may experience none or minor side effects.

Consult with your doctor if they become problematic or frequent

More common are,

  • Redness, pain, or swelling where the shot was given
  • Low fever
  • Mild fussiness or crying
  • Loss of appetite
  • Drowsiness

More severe are,

  • Severe weakness, trouble breathing
  • Extreme drowsiness, fainting
  • Fussiness, irritability, crying for an hour or longer
  • Seizure (convulsions)
  • High fever

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur.

Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects.

You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

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