Acupuncturist Questions Blood circulation

How can acupuncture improve blood circulation?

I was reading an article for ways to improve my circulation, and a website actually suggested using acupuncture to help me. How does acupuncture help with improve circulation?

17 Answers

Acupuncture can balance the ying and yan, move qi and blood,invigorates the channels & the collaterals, thus to improve circulation.
Acuouncture is a great tool to improve circulation. Inserting needles at specific points in the body improves circulation and oxygenation to the tissues therefore alleviating pain. Lost of patients receiving regular acupuncture report feeling warmer feet and hands :-)
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Improving circulation is the number one reason to do acupuncture! The needle placement is designed to help remove any stagnation, relax the body, and allow the blood to flow properly throughout the body. When circulation is improved, the blood and the "Qi" move together to all parts of the body needing healing.
A major basis of acupuncture works on the flow of blood and qi (energy) throughout your body. In western medical terms, this is the circulatory system. We work to remove blockages that are preventing that flow of qi and blood. Once they're all removed, everything flows as it should.
The theory behind acupuncture is to 'promote circulation'. Because of this very reason, acupuncture will almost always promote blood circulation in your body. Cold hands/feet? Cold limbs? Cold core temp? Too hot somewhere?
No problem. Acupuncture is an excellent therapy to promote circulation all throughout your body whether you feel hot OR cold.
According to Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), one main function of acupuncture is the circulation of qi (energy) and blood throughout the body.

This claim was supported by a 2015 study using photoplethysmography (PPG), a technique used to detect blood volume changes in small blood vessels. The results published in Electron Devices and Solid-State Circuits demonstrated that acupuncture induces “significant elevation of peripheral blood flow.” Modern studies continue to confirm the many positive benefits of acupuncture recognized by TCM for thousands of years.
When there is too many lactic acid and old red blood cells during a prolonged injury, our circulation is impeded. Therefore, Acupuncture can improve circulation by promoting new red blood cells to form in our blood vessels, which will improve blood circulation.
Yes, I believe so.
According to Traditional Chinese Medicine, qi (energy) moves the blood. So if your qi is stagnated, your circulation can be, as well. Acupuncture helps get your qi moving and balanced so your body can heal itself, and your circulation is improved.

Hope this helps!
Acupuncture helps regulate many of the body's systems, including the digestive, the circulatory, the lymphatic, etc. No one really know the full reasoning behind the physiology behind it and there have been many studies giving a variety of explanations. So, this shows that there are many aspects of the body's functions that are being activated with the acupuncture stimulation.

From a Chinese medical standpoint, we are adjusting the organs ability to function and setting the body to coordinate with the other organs functions, so it works smoothly on it's own. In other words, it helps the blood circulate because it helps the breathing and digestion circulate - together they "build blood" and "move blood".
Acupuncture can break up stagnation or blockage of energy. Depending on why your blood circulation is poor, acupuncture can remove stagnation or even create more blood in the body. Find a practitioner and engage in an initial consultation face-to-face to get a better direction for your specific condition.
Improving circulation is one of the things acupuncture does best. I've seen horribly discolored lower legs return to normal in less than 12 sessions, wounds heal quickly and cold limbs become warm. However, if you have a circulatory issue, please do not abandon your medications in lieu of acupuncture without the guidance of your prescribing doctor. Your safety is first and foremost and one should never stop taking medications without guidance.
Micro thin needles create small holes or lacerations to stimulate the bodies intelligent healing response, with this modality being around for many thousands of years, we have hundreds of thousands of written records to determine the specific point protocols
There are certain acupuncture points that can activate blood circulation and move and push the blood flow. Thus can improve the circulation.
There is a publication comparing the distribution of acupuncture meridians to the distribution of neurovascular by using mathematical analysis; the result was over 70% of meridians are either near major nerves and vessels, or overlap them. When the needles are inserted into the body, they will modulate the activities in the "neighborhood."
Hi there,
Always have your physician check you out for correct diagnoses and referral or recommend to the right specialist. In TCM, "qi" is the driving force. If qi is stagnated or not flowing smoothly then blood will be stagnated. Qi and blood compliment each other. TCM has acupuncture techniques to help move the qi and also herbal medicine to help with qi and blood circulation.
Acupuncture can help improve circulation as well as help moderate blood pressure (either too high or too low).

Studies involving acupuncture have pretty consistently shown that it is, at least in part, stimulating the parasympathetic part of the autonomic nervous system. This is part of the nervous system that acts in opposition to the "fight or flight" side.

There are a lot of potential effects which can result from activating the parasympathetic system and one of them has to do with relaxing blood vessels. This allows blood to flow more freely contributing to increased circulation.

If you decide to try acupuncture, please make sure you're seeing an NCCAOM board certified acupuncturist. You can start with the "Find a Practitioner" link at NCCAOM.org to find someone local to you.