Chiropractor Questions Shoulder pain

Can you suggest some medication for treating my shoulder pain?

I am having pain in my shoulders from working long hours in my office. Is there any medication that you recommend to treat shoulder pain?

17 Answers

I cannot recommend medication as a chiropractor but I can suggest using CBD cream or sombra cream which are very useful for pain,
Chiropractors do not recommend or dispense medications. That is the expertise of your medical doctor. If the medication does not afford long term relief it is probably due to a musculoskeletal condition and I would see a chiropractor.
See your physician for advice on medications. Chiropractic treatment is a viable alternative to opioids and other medications.
Unfortunately I cannot recommend any medications to you under my scope of practice. I can however tell you I have several patients that take ibuprofen for their shoulder pain and they tell me it works well for them.
Shoulder pain can come from the neck, the shoulder, the rib or rib cage, pelvic bones or organs like intestine for example. In order to better help you, a FREE 20 minutes consultation would be the first steps to lead you toward a better solution and the next step,
I’m sorry, I don’t prescribe medication. I would visit your primary physician for an answer to that. You could also seek a chiropractor to find the cause of the pain and see if chiropractics could take care of your problem.

Good luck!!
Sorry, to clarify; medication will NOT treat the cause of the problem, it will only decrease symptoms while allowing the actual cause of the problem to worsen.
I would not recommend medication. I would recommend getting your spine corrected by your local chiropractor.
Drugs, prescription or OTC, won't treat the CAUSE of your shoulder pain. If you truly believe working long hours is the cause, then look at your work schedule and decide what you will do to work fewer hours. However, many people work long hours and don't experience shoulder pain. Why do you?
Let's list likely causes and see if correcting any you have fixes the shoulder pain:

1. Work station is not ergonomically set up for your body to function without excess strain. Tense neck from cell phone use is becoming a classic example of poor
ergonomics causing pain. Go online and find out how to set up your station ergonomically, including your desk chair.
2. Old or new macro or micro trauma (car accident, falls, bed pillow, watching TV with head propped on couch arm, holding phone with head tilted, etc.), which may require a chiropractic evaluation and treatment, if indicated. Physical therapy modalities and massage can give relief, but rarely treat the cause.
3. Nutrition insufficiencies, especially of magnesium, calcium and/or vitamins B and C (whole, not just ascorbic acid)
4. An inflammatory diet high in sugar and commercially raised animal protein, lack of fresh, organic fruits and veggies, dehydration from inadequate water intake, too much caffeine and alcohol, and eating processed junk foods.
5. Poor handling of stress and stressors. There are several techniques to help decrease the effects. My favorite is the Silva Method.

While you are figuring out and fixing the above, curcumin has been shown to be equal to or better than Tylenol in relieving pain. There are other natural products that relieve pain, too. All without the potential side effects associated with NSAIDs and other pain relief drugs. Just be aware, natural pain relief is not fixing the cause either.

I wish you pain-free work days.

Dr. Juanee Surprise
As a doctor of chiropractic, I cannot prescribe or recommend medicine. That question is best posed to your favorite MD.
If you want to fix the problem, medication isn’t the answer. They will hide pain. I would recommend starting with a chiropractic assessment and going from there.

Sincerely,
Dr. Joel Duchon
As a chiropractor, I cannot, but seeing your local physiatrist or orthopedic would be helpful for diagnosis and medication recommendations.
There is over the counter creams but if you are looking for anything stronger a steroid injection may help. A more natural approach would be platelet rich plasma, tissue regeneration therapy or stem cell therapy
Hello,

There are many over-the-counter medications that you can take to help with pain relief depending on what is causing you pain. In other words, the better thing to do is to get a diagnosis possibly of what is wrong. Could be just postural muscles that need strengthening from sitting all day or it could be more of an injury that is aggravating by sitting. Please visit either your primary doctor or a postural specialist (chiropractor, physical therapist) for that. Any stronger medication would have to be advised by your primary. You can look up postural exercises online and start them for 2 weeks to see if they help.
Medication can help you to cover it up, but it won’t help you heal up. So no, I would not recommend any medication to you. You can try icing it or using heat on it if it bothers you that much. I would also recommend having it checked out so you know how bad it is. My son just hurt his shoulder recently and we took some films and put him through some tests. Then we are having him rest it, but also put some gentle motion into it. He is also receiving Upper Cervical Spine Care to help with nerve flow, blood flow in and out of the area. He is improving little by little each day. A slow process, but if you are doing good, helpful things, then you should expect improvement over time.
You would do best by avoiding NSAIDS like Ibuprofen, and Acetamenophen. These are not good to treat chronic, long-term pain. They can damage you organs. You could try homeopathic remedies like Arnica Montana. There are also some very effective creams like Real Time Pain Relief, or Deep Blue Essential Oil. The best treatment is to find the cause of the pain. A good chiropractor can help you determine if your pain is due to nerve irritation, poor posture, poor muscle balance or shoulders that need to be adjusted.
As a chiropractor, I am not the best person to suggest medicine usage, the pharmacist at your local drug store can or your primary care. A topical analgesic that you can buy over the counter may be helpful, but if you have to use it more than half the working days in a month, then I strongly recommend seeking care.
Take care.