Podiatrist (Foot and Ankle Specialist) Questions foot pain

Should I see a podiatrist for my feet If I have diabetes?

I am suffering from tremendous foot pain, and I believe that it could be associated with my diabetes. Should I see a podiatrist when I have diabetes?

19 Answers

Yes you should. Diabetics develop problems with their feet 80% of the time. You can experience diabetic peripheral neuropathy, vascular disease, and skin/toenail conditions.
Please make it your business to see a podiatrist every 2 or 3 moths. About 5 times a year is highly recommended.
Yes. You must see podiatrist near your home so your podiatrist can exam your foot pain and give you proper treatment.
Diabetes is an endocrine disorder that results in impaired glucose metabolism. The persistence of elevated blood sugars can impact multiple organ systems that frequently can be reflected in injuries to the lower extremities and feet. Diabetes can impact peripheral circulation, sensation and immune response to injury including the presence of infection. Diabetic
feet require special attention by medical practitioners who have a keen appreciation for subtle changes that may portend future complications. Reduced ability to palpate pulses in the feet, diminished or absent hair growth, sluggish capillary return, altered skin temperature can suggest reduced blood flow. Reduced appreciation for tactile sensation to light touch, sharp stimulus, vibratory appreciation can suggest reduced feeling. Inability to mount an appropriate immune response to local microbial contamination can result in severe infection. For these reasons, diabetics are encouraged to have a periodic evaluation by a foot specialist. Depending on the identified risk presentation, the frequency of visits will be determined by the specialist.
Every diabetic should see a podiatrist at least once a year. Tremendous pain in your feet could be to nerve issues.

Jonathan M. Kletz, DPM
Hello,

If you are diabetic and you have serious foot pain then yes you should be evaluated by a podiatrist.

Dr. Lui
Hello and thank you for your question. The simple answer to your question is yes. Diabetic patients should see a foot doctor once a year at minimum. I would ask your primary care physician for a referral to Podiatry. I wish you the best of luck. God bless.
ADA recommendation is to see podiatrist yearly for routine monitoring. If the podiatrist finds a problem, they may refer you for further testing such as vascular evaluation and you may need to be seen more frequently depending on results of testing
That is an obvious yes answer.
Yes, as a diabetic there are many complications that can occur in regards to your feet. You could be suffering from nerve degeneration called neuropathy. This can cause severe pain in some people or it be other issues that need evaluation. You should go see your local Podiatrist as soon as you are able. We manage diabetic foot problems and can also refer you to another specialty if deemed appropriate. Also, if there were no foot problems you should have an annual foot evaluation by a podiatrist as a diabetic.
It is important to see your diabetic doctor as keeping blood sugars under control helps your body maintain the ability to fight infection well. Your skin is the body’s first defense against infection. We know with poor circulation, lack of feeling and a great deal of pressure on your skin you are likely to walk a hole in the skin. Your podiatrist will evaluate your risks of ulceration in the skin and your chances of infection that could result in the infection getting into the bone and possibly lose that bone, foot, leg, or even your life.
You not only should see a podiatrist, but from what you are describing you must see a Podiatrist ASAP. All diabetics should be seen by a podiatrist and eye doctor on a regular basis in addition to your primary care and / or endocrinologist. Uncontrolled diabetes often leads to pain, amputations, blindness and kidney failure. Regular care and evaluation can significantly reduce these risks.
There is no question to your question. It is an absolute necessity. If I developed DM, I would see a podiatrist.

Rod Tomczak, MD, EdD
The answer is yes. You should see a podiatrist at least 1 time a year.
Yes. That is a good idea. Could prevent further complications down the road for you.
Yes, diabetes has many effects on your feet and you should be seeing a podiatrist regularly.
Patients with diabetes need to be diligent about inspecting their feet. I do think you should be evaluated by a foot and ankle specialist (podiatrist) especially if you are having pain. They can discuss the possible problems that can develop and discuss good habits to reduce risk.
Yes you should. We have made progress in preventing foot ulcers and amputations in persons with diabetes but we're not through yet until we prevent all loss of toes, feet or limbs due to diabetes. SO 1) Keep your diabetes in control & A1c down as high blood sugar damages the blood vessels and nerves of the feet & causes burning pain, loss of sensation & positional control, foot ulcers, infection & amputation. 2) inspect your feet daily. If you can't see them then have someone look or attach a mirror to a stick or pole {a cell phone on a selfie stick will work} and view at least daily 3) if any abnormality is found see a Dr. & that can be a podiatrist. 4) see a podiatrist on a regular basis or be sure your physician inspects your feet at every visit. Let's prevent all foot ulcers & amputations and put those surgeons out of business!!
The absolute answer is "YES! WITHOUT QUESTION!" Diabetics are at a much higher risk for amputation, particularly if you have impairment of your circulation or your nerves (Neuropathy). Uncomplicated Diabetics are seen once a year. Patients with Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD) or Neuropathy are at more risk, and qualify to be seen every 8-10 weeks for nail care and callus care, and are usually allowed 1 pair of Diabetic shoes with custom insoles every year. Read about Diabetics and lower extremity amputations.
YES! Absolutely! Go now and make regularly scheduled appointments