Women's Health

Research Reveals Many Women Do Not Follow Through with Recommended Genetic Testing

 Research Reveals: How was the data sourced?

How was the data sourced?

The researchers examined data from the 2005, 2010, and 2015 National Health Interview Surveys, which are administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Using the National Cancer Network’s guidelines regarding provision of care for people with cancer, the Chiders and Maggard-Gibbons group focused on women surveyed who would benefit the most from genetic testing:

  • Women who have had ovarian cancer
  • Women who have had breast cancer, if:
    • They were diagnosed at age 45 or younger (this age bracket includes those in their 30’s who are at prime risk of being diagnosed.)
    • They were diagnosed at age 50 years or younger,
    • and have a mother, sister or daughter who’s had breast cancer
    • They have a mother, sister, or daughter who had
    • Breast cancer when they were aged 50 or younger
    • They have a mother, sister, or daughter who has ovarian cancer.

For this study, 47,218 files were reviewed.