Dr. Richard E Bensinger M.D.?
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Dr. Richard E Bensinger M.D., Ophthalmologist

Dr. Richard E Bensinger M.D.

Ophthalmologist

(35)
1221 Madison St Suite 1200 Seattle WA, 98104
Rating

3/5

About

Dr. Richard Bensinger is an ophthalmologist practicing in Seattle, WA. Dr. Bensinger specializes in eye and vision care. As an ophthalmologist, Dr. Bensinger can practice medicine as well as surgery. Opthalmologists can perform surgeries because they have their medical degrees along with at least eight years of additional training. Dr. Bensinger can diagnose and treat diseases, perform eye operations and prescribe eye glasses and contacts. Ophthalmologists can also specialize even further in a specific area of eye care.

Education and Training

Johns Hopkins Univ Sch of Med, Baltimore Md 1969

Board Certification

OphthalmologyAmerican Board of OphthalmologyABO

Provider Details

MaleEnglish 44 years of experience
Dr. Richard E Bensinger M.D.
Dr. Richard E Bensinger M.D.'s Expert Contributions
  • Are lenses better than glasses?

    Do you mean contact lenses v. eyeglasses? Contacts require more care and handling, but provide comfortable vision when the right prescription and size is prescribed. Eyeglasses can be comfortable but obviously sit on the front of the face which some find objectionable. They do provide protection that contacts do not as they are a barrier from the outside world. READ MORE

  • What is the best eye surgery?

    LASIK is currently the best with several tens of millions of procedures having been done since inception. You need to consult with a LASIK surgeon to see if your eyes qualify. READ MORE

  • Can stress cause red eyes?

    Some have sensitive systems in their face and eyes. This is seen as flushing and/or blushing which is psychogenic and not due to pathology. The eyes can respond in this way. Treatment is not necessary. READ MORE

  • How can I hydrate my eyes after LASIK?

    Have you had LASIK yet? Your LASIK surgeon can suggest hydration methods. The usual means are ointment at night and lubricating drops during the day. Do not use drops that say "gets the red out" as these are drying. READ MORE

  • How much does vision correction surgery cost?

    The cost varies from region to region and also varies due to the type and amount of correction required. The range for two eyes is about $3000 to $5000. Most vision correction places will evaluate you for free and cover the costs. Make an appointment to get the information keyed to your eyes. READ MORE

  • Do I need to see a doctor with conjunctivitis?

    Most adult conjunctivitis is viral. If you have preserved vision, minimal pain and just red eyes with sticky, not pus, secretion, then it is likely viral. Keep it clean with warm or cool soaks and recall that it is contagious so wash your hands after manipulating your eyes. Viral will heal itself in 3-10 days depending on the strain of virus. READ MORE

  • Is saltwater good for conjunctivitis?

    Not useful. If you have classic conjunctivitis, which is viral, then just keep the eye(s) clean with fresh water and know that there are no anti-virals to treat the condition. Antibiotics, commonly prescribed for this, are of no use. READ MORE

  • What is a good vitamin for dry eyes?

    Flax seed oil. READ MORE

  • Is eye twitching a sign of MS?

    Eye twitching is common in the middle years (20-50). It is at worst annoying, but is almost always not pathologic. It is not an early sign of MS. In a few cases that are extreme, with prolonged twitching obvious to others, Botox can attenuate the twitching. This is rare. The condition is called "myokymia" if you want to look it up on the internet. READ MORE

  • When should you have cataracts removed?

    The time to remove cataracts is when they are sufficiently advanced to interfere visually with what is important in your life such as driving, or reading or what you do in your work place. Until then, they will do no harm. READ MORE

  • What are the best sunglasses for light sensitive eyes?

    No sunglasses are specific, but any optical shop can make one very dark. Sunglasses are a good idea anyway. READ MORE

  • How to help boyfriend who had battery acid in eye?

    You can help him to an ophthalmologist - preferably today. On Monday, January 27, 2020, 07:28:14 AM PST, FATD Patient Questions <answers+1166800_53716_333cddd670091021694e507682bd4efa@expert.findatopdoc.com> wrote: You've Been Asked a Question by a Potential Patient#yiv9796817987 .yiv9796817987ReadMsgBody {width:100%;}#yiv9796817987 #yiv9796817987outlook a {padding:0;}#yiv9796817987 .yiv9796817987ExternalClass {width:100%;}#yiv9796817987 body{width:100%;margin:0;padding:0;}#yiv9796817987 html {width:100%;}#yiv9796817987 table {border-collapse:collapse;}#yiv9796817987 a .filtered99999 {color:inherit !important;text-decoration:none !important;font-size:inherit !important;font-family:inherit !important;font-weight:inherit !important;line-height:inherit !important;}@media only screen and (max-width:599px) {#yiv9796817987 a .filtered99999 , #yiv9796817987 a .filtered99999 {text-decoration:none;cursor:default;}#yiv9796817987 .yiv9796817987mobile_link a .filtered99999 , #yiv9796817987 .yiv9796817987mobile_link a .filtered99999 {cursor:default;}#yiv9796817987 a .filtered99999 {color:inherit !important;text-decoration:none !important;font-size:inherit !important;font-family:inherit !important;font-weight:inherit !important;line-height:inherit !important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 .yiv9796817987deviceWidth {width:100%!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 .yiv9796817987deviceWidth_s {width:92%!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 .yiv9796817987deviceWidth_leadtop {padding-top:20px!important;padding-bottom:20px!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 table[class=yiv9796817987devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 td[class=yiv9796817987devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv9796817987fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;border-left:none!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv9796817987fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;float:left;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 img[class="yiv9796817987fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv9796817987aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv9796817987aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 .yiv9796817987center {text-align:center!important;}}@media only screen and (max-width:479px) {#yiv9796817987 a .filtered99999 , #yiv9796817987 a .filtered99999 {text-decoration:none;cursor:default;}#yiv9796817987 .yiv9796817987mobile_link a .filtered99999 , #yiv9796817987 .yiv9796817987mobile_link a .filtered99999 {color:#ffffff !important;cursor:default;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 .yiv9796817987deviceWidth {width:100%!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 .yiv9796817987deviceWidth_s {width:86%!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 .yiv9796817987deviceWidth_logo {width:100%!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 .yiv9796817987deviceWidth_leadtop {padding-top:30px!important;padding-bottom:30px!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 table[class=yiv9796817987devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 td[class=yiv9796817987devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv9796817987fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;border-left:none!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv9796817987fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;float:left;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 img[class="yiv9796817987fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv9796817987aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv9796817987aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv9796817987 body .filtered99999 .yiv9796817987center {text-align:center!important;}} You have a new patient question! All you have to do is reply to this email to answer. All questions and answers are for informational purposes only. | | | | |   | | | | One of your patients has asked you a question | | Click here to view this request online | | | | | | | | Dr. Bensinger | | Question Alert | | You Have A New Patient Question | | Simply reply to this email with your answer. | |   | | | |   | | | How to help boyfriend who had battery acid in eye? | | |   | | My boyfriend got battery acid in his eye. He has washed it numerous times for the last couple hours. He is in a lot of pain. Nothing not even up to 3 inches or closer to his face without him being in, then more rain. His eyes watering really bad. Is red and swollen? What do I do? | |   | | | Age: | none | | Gender: | none | | Duration: | none | | Medications: | none | | Conditions: | none | | |   | | | |   | | Reply to this email to answer, or Login to see all questions. | | | | | | | | If you don't want to receive patient questions, click here IT IS SAFE TO PARTICIPATE. Answering this question does not constitute medical advice or establish a doctor-patient relationship. All questions and answers are for informational purpose only. All question submitters are advised to seek the care of their local medical provider. | |   | | Find A Top Doc 1350 Ave of the Americas New York, NY. 10019 United States (866) 664-DOCS Copyright 2008-2020. All Rights Reserved. | | | READ MORE

  • How does bright light benefit if your eyes are sensitive and you are prone to migraines?

    Bright light especially outdoors can be annoying but not harmful. It is why we wear sunglasses in that case. Bright light indoors can improve the ability to view at near - fine print, threading needles, etc. These lights in most settings are well below the level of discomfort.   On Monday, January 27, 2020, 08:06:57 AM PST, FATD Patient Questions <answers+1166474_53716_8b9691d7a96c376f01cfa26f66738c5b@expert.findatopdoc.com> wrote: You've Been Asked a Question by a Potential Patient#yiv6200012071 .yiv6200012071ReadMsgBody {width:100%;}#yiv6200012071 #yiv6200012071outlook a {padding:0;}#yiv6200012071 .yiv6200012071ExternalClass {width:100%;}#yiv6200012071 body{width:100%;margin:0;padding:0;}#yiv6200012071 html {width:100%;}#yiv6200012071 table {border-collapse:collapse;}#yiv6200012071 a .filtered99999 {color:inherit !important;text-decoration:none !important;font-size:inherit !important;font-family:inherit !important;font-weight:inherit !important;line-height:inherit !important;}@media only screen and (max-width:599px) {#yiv6200012071 a .filtered99999 , #yiv6200012071 a .filtered99999 {text-decoration:none;cursor:default;}#yiv6200012071 .yiv6200012071mobile_link a .filtered99999 , #yiv6200012071 .yiv6200012071mobile_link a .filtered99999 {cursor:default;}#yiv6200012071 a .filtered99999 {color:inherit !important;text-decoration:none !important;font-size:inherit !important;font-family:inherit !important;font-weight:inherit !important;line-height:inherit !important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 .yiv6200012071deviceWidth {width:100%!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 .yiv6200012071deviceWidth_s {width:92%!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 .yiv6200012071deviceWidth_leadtop {padding-top:20px!important;padding-bottom:20px!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 table[class=yiv6200012071devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 td[class=yiv6200012071devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv6200012071fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;border-left:none!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv6200012071fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;float:left;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 img[class="yiv6200012071fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv6200012071aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv6200012071aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 .yiv6200012071center {text-align:center!important;}}@media only screen and (max-width:479px) {#yiv6200012071 a .filtered99999 , #yiv6200012071 a .filtered99999 {text-decoration:none;cursor:default;}#yiv6200012071 .yiv6200012071mobile_link a .filtered99999 , #yiv6200012071 .yiv6200012071mobile_link a .filtered99999 {color:#ffffff !important;cursor:default;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 .yiv6200012071deviceWidth {width:100%!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 .yiv6200012071deviceWidth_s {width:86%!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 .yiv6200012071deviceWidth_logo {width:100%!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 .yiv6200012071deviceWidth_leadtop {padding-top:30px!important;padding-bottom:30px!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 table[class=yiv6200012071devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 td[class=yiv6200012071devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv6200012071fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;border-left:none!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv6200012071fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;float:left;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 img[class="yiv6200012071fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv6200012071aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv6200012071aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv6200012071 body .filtered99999 .yiv6200012071center {text-align:center!important;}} You have a new patient question! All you have to do is reply to this email to answer. All questions and answers are for informational purposes only. | | | | |   | | | | One of your patients has asked you a question | | Click here to view this request online | | | | | | | | Dr. Bensinger | | Question Alert | | You Have A New Patient Question | | Simply reply to this email with your answer. | |   | | | |   | | | How does bright light benefit if your eyes are sensitive and you are prone to migraines? | | |   | | I have Fibromyalgia, spinal sclerosis - balance off at times. | |   | | | Age: | 69 | | Gender: | Female | | Duration: | 1984 | | Medications: | Low dose A.D. asthma meds | | Conditions: | Fibromyalgia ,asthma,spinal sclerosis | | |   | | | |   | | Reply to this email to answer, or Login to see all questions. | | | | | | | | If you don't want to receive patient questions, click here IT IS SAFE TO PARTICIPATE. Answering this question does not constitute medical advice or establish a doctor-patient relationship. All questions and answers are for informational purpose only. All question submitters are advised to seek the care of their local medical provider. | |   | | Find A Top Doc 1350 Ave of the Americas New York, NY. 10019 United States (866) 664-DOCS Copyright 2008-2020. All Rights Reserved. | | | READ MORE

  • How do I know if I need glasses?

    Compare your vision at a distance to an acquaintance who has good vision. Probably reading the print on a storefront or billboard would indicate whether you see as well as this person. If not, then you might need an eye examination. On Thursday, January 9, 2020, 10:24:36 AM PST, FATD Patient Questions <answers+1113528_53716_a4a767e4e13ae77a60efda78da5d6c15@expert.findatopdoc.com> wrote: You've Been Asked a Question by a Potential Patient#yiv5300919828 .yiv5300919828ReadMsgBody {width:100%;}#yiv5300919828 #yiv5300919828outlook a {padding:0;}#yiv5300919828 .yiv5300919828ExternalClass {width:100%;}#yiv5300919828 body{width:100%;margin:0;padding:0;}#yiv5300919828 html {width:100%;}#yiv5300919828 table {border-collapse:collapse;}#yiv5300919828 a .filtered99999 {color:inherit !important;text-decoration:none !important;font-size:inherit !important;font-family:inherit !important;font-weight:inherit !important;line-height:inherit !important;}@media only screen and (max-width:599px) {#yiv5300919828 a .filtered99999 , #yiv5300919828 a .filtered99999 {text-decoration:none;cursor:default;}#yiv5300919828 .yiv5300919828mobile_link a .filtered99999 , #yiv5300919828 .yiv5300919828mobile_link a .filtered99999 {cursor:default;}#yiv5300919828 a .filtered99999 {color:inherit !important;text-decoration:none !important;font-size:inherit !important;font-family:inherit !important;font-weight:inherit !important;line-height:inherit !important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 .yiv5300919828deviceWidth {width:100%!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 .yiv5300919828deviceWidth_s {width:92%!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 .yiv5300919828deviceWidth_leadtop {padding-top:20px!important;padding-bottom:20px!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 table[class=yiv5300919828devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 td[class=yiv5300919828devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv5300919828fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;border-left:none!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv5300919828fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;float:left;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 img[class="yiv5300919828fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv5300919828aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv5300919828aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 .yiv5300919828center {text-align:center!important;}}@media only screen and (max-width:479px) {#yiv5300919828 a .filtered99999 , #yiv5300919828 a .filtered99999 {text-decoration:none;cursor:default;}#yiv5300919828 .yiv5300919828mobile_link a .filtered99999 , #yiv5300919828 .yiv5300919828mobile_link a .filtered99999 {color:#ffffff !important;cursor:default;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 .yiv5300919828deviceWidth {width:100%!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 .yiv5300919828deviceWidth_s {width:86%!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 .yiv5300919828deviceWidth_logo {width:100%!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 .yiv5300919828deviceWidth_leadtop {padding-top:30px!important;padding-bottom:30px!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 table[class=yiv5300919828devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 td[class=yiv5300919828devicewidth] {width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv5300919828fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;border-left:none!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv5300919828fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;float:left;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 img[class="yiv5300919828fullwidth"]{width:100%!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 td[class="yiv5300919828aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 table[class="yiv5300919828aligncenter"]{width:100%!important;text-align:center!important;}#yiv5300919828 body .filtered99999 .yiv5300919828center {text-align:center!important;}} You have a new patient question! All you have to do is reply to this email to answer. All questions and answers are for informational purposes only. | | | | |   | | | | Someone has asked you a question | | Click here to view this request online | | | | | | | | Dr. Bensinger | | Question Alert | | You Have A New Question | | Simply reply to this email with your answer. | |   | | | |   | | | How do I know if I need glasses? | | |   | | I am a 21 year old male. I have fairly good vision but need to squint sometimes. How do I know if I need glasses? | |   | |   | | | |   | | Reply to this email to answer, or Login to see all questions. | | | | | | | | If you don't want to receive patient questions, click here IT IS SAFE TO PARTICIPATE. Answering this question does not constitute medical advice or establish a doctor-patient relationship. All questions and answers are for informational purpose only. All question submitters are advised to seek the care of their local medical provider. | |   | | Find A Top Doc 1350 Ave of the Americas New York, NY. 10019 United States (866) 664-DOCS Copyright 2020 FINDATOPDOC. All Rights Reserved. | | | READ MORE

  • How long does it take for pink eye to go away?

    Depends upon the nature of the infection. Most "pink eye" is due to one of about 40 viruses and the length of the condition can be from 3 days to 10 days for most. Two of them have a lengthy course that can last for up to 2-3 months. These are quite rare. READ MORE

  • Can I drive after Lasik?

    You should have a friend, companion, etc., to drive you home from LASIK as there is typically a 12-hour or so haziness which could make driving hazardous. READ MORE

  • Should I wear my glasses all the time if I'm farsighted?

    Eyeglasses are a means to see clearly. The eyes will do their best whether or not you wear your eyeglasses. This is a personal choice. If you wear them, you will have sharper vision. If you don't care, then don't wear them. However, in many, uncorrected farsightedness can lead to headaches so keep this in mind. =20 READ MORE

  • Has my vision increased or decreased?

    This would be considered an improvement. It might fall within the range of statistical error representing no change, but an improvement on numbers alone. READ MORE

  • What causes poor vision in low light?

    Some see poorly in low light with no known pathology. More common causes are some inherited retinal diseases, diabetic retinal disease and some other conditions. Best to see an ophthalmologist to have this evaluated.   READ MORE

  • Will lasik eye surgery make my vision perfect?

    Depends. If your current need for eyeglasses meets the standards for the machines capabilities, then perfect vision is likely. If you are outside the criteria, then you might have a less than optimal result or possibly be rejected as a candidate altogether.  READ MORE

  • Are eye floaters dangerous?

    As the fluids in the back of the eye termed the vitreous change with age, sometimes suspended irregularities and membrane fragments can come into view. These are termed floaters.  Floaters are usually benign but annoying. We generally do not worry if there are 1-4 floaters in one eye but you should seek immediate help if there are hundreds all at one. Work is being done currently to adapt lasers to treat annoying floaters although perfection is not here yet. READ MORE

  • What are the treatment options for dry eye?

    This is a whole essay in this rapidly evolving field.  Dry eyes can occur from deficient tear flow, inadequate mucus in the tears, deficient oils in the tears, inflammation of the lids usually termed meibomian gland dysfunction;  all of which can be worsened by dry atmospheres and dry climates.  There is a 'step ladder' of treatments depending upon the underlying problem which includes lubricating tear replacements, nightly addition of gels and ointments and treatment of the meibomian gland problem if present.  The tear outflow plumbing can be attenuated with temporary or permanent plugs to block outflow.  A variety of mechanical devices can be used to "milk" the lid glands to unclog obstructed output.  Focal heat can be useful.  In more extreme cases, goggles can be used to contain moisture in the eye area and ultrasonic devices can rain a shower of moisture over the bed area during sleep.  Other measures are available for more extreme cases.  You should consult an ophthalmologist if this is a chronic problem - especially a corneal specialist as these commonly deal with these conditions.   READ MORE

  • Are contact lenses safe to use every day?

    Contact lenses have tens of millions of users. They have been thoroughly tested. See your ophthalmologist for proper fitting and power and you should be comfortable, clear, and safe. READ MORE

  • What is the right age for Lasik eye surgery?

    The general break point is age 23 when few if any changes in the prescription can be expected.  The surgeons doing this feel best when what correction they develop can be stable for a lengthy time.   READ MORE

  • What are the treatment options for cataracts?

    You are a bit on the young side to have serious cataracts. I am guessing that you saw an optometrist who made this diagnosis. Your best bet at this time is to consult with an ophthalmologist - the medical doctor trained eye specialists - to see if you actually do have cataracts. As for treatment, the time to consider cataract surgery is when your corrected vision is lowered to the point that you have visual difficulties in ordinary activities such as reading or driving and whatever visual needs you have at work. I would bet that you do not have cataracts at your age, but just need an improved eyeglass correction. READ MORE

  • How do eye floaters develop?

    Floaters are the term for membrane fragments and minor condensations floating in the vitreous - the gel that fills the back of the eye. Some are there from birth; others from changes in the vitreous over time. They are usually benign, but you should be evaluated if you see hundreds all at once. They can be annoying. Some are working with laser treatments for them, but this is not established treatment yet.   READ MORE

  • What are the treatment options for high eye pressure?

    There are fortunately many options. Elevated pressure is best handled by the complete eye specialist - an ophthalmologist and there are some that specialize in glaucoma. Treatment options to lower the pressure include a variety of topical medications, a few systemic options, laser treatment and operative surgery. The ophthalmologist can do all of these (not so for an optometrist). Discuss what is appropriate for you with your ophthalmologist.   READ MORE

  • Are there any treatment options for floaters?

    Floaters are benign specks floating in the vitreous gel in the back of the eye.  They can be quite annoying.  If there are hundreds at once, seek an ophthalmologist right away as that can be a sign of trouble needing treatment.  For the usual 1-4 floaters mostly they can be ignored.  Some are large enough or bothersome enough that one wishes to do something about them.  The usual method is to do a procedure termed vitrectomy.  This is invasive and carries some risk so is rarely suggested.  If the floaters are anterior in the vitreous, YAG laser can sometimes vaporize them but this is tricky and frequently fails.  Work is being done to improve lasers and lenses to more effectively treat floaters but that is in the wings.  It should be available in the next 1-3 years.  Best to wait for that. READ MORE

  • How often do I need to change my contact lenses?

    Each type of contact lens has a time for length of use and change needed as posted by the manufacturer. Generally, the prescriber of the lenses will tell you these times as well as how to care for the lens. Sometimes you will get an information pamphlet with your initial amount of lenses. If all else fails, look up either the lens type or the manufacturer on the internet and get the information you need. READ MORE

  • What will doctors ask me about at my ophthalmic pathology follow up?

    I am guessing that you had a biopsy and the pathology report will be that of the results of this biopsy. Your treating surgeon will receive a report from the pathologist giving the details of the results. It is unlikely that you will get the microscopic details presented. You will be told whether the architecture of the biopsy was benign or malignant (a cancer). If benign, that is usually the end of the issue. If malignant, further work might need to be done and depending upon the type of malignancy you might be advised to have systemic studies for cancer spread, and sometimes referral to an oncologist for treatment.  READ MORE

  • How long does retina surgery take?

    Depends upon many factors: what surgery is planned, e.g., retinal re-attachment, which could be lengthy (about 1 1/2  to 3 hours), or treatments for diabetes or retinal vascular diseases, which could be 45 minutes each. There are many other retinal problems, each with its own complexity and length of surgery. Discuss this with the surgeon with whom you have scheduled surgery and whether you will be asleep or not.   READ MORE

  • What are the treatments for 6th nerve palsy?

    In the acute phase, which is generally 6-8 months after the palsy appears, most simply wait to see what spontaneous healing takes place. After that healing cannot improve any further. Adaptation does occur to some degree as you have no doubt discovered. The goal of treatment after spontaneous recovery can occur is to move the position of the eyes to allow single vision in the two most useful positions: straight ahead and straight down. Eye muscle surgery can usually accomplish this. Prisms can be added to glasses to determine how successful this will be and also to temporarily improve things. Rarely, an occlusive patch is recommended for the elusive eye when these methods fail. READ MORE

  • Are honey eye drops bad for the eyes?

    This is one of many suggested remedies from the natural therapy folks. Honey is generally pure and hopefully you will use clean water. This can soothe the eyes but will have no effect on clearing or lightening the eyes. If you have excess vessels on the surface and want to look good in pictures, any of the "gets the red out eye drops" can do this. They are drying so not useful on a regular basis. Hopefully, you are the only one who notices how your eyes look and most others probably think they look terrific.   READ MORE

  • Can I get new glasses without an eye exam?

    Depends upon your state. In mine, the optometrists have pushed through a law requiring a new prescription every two years and opticians will not fill one over two years old. This is called marketing. Do you have a copy of your original prescription for eyeglasses? Your current glasses can be "read" in a special machine and the numbers obtained to make new eyeglasses. Put all of this together and perhaps you can talk an optician into reading your glasses and making a new one. Never forget the power of making a little profit. READ MORE

  • Should I worry about the twitching of my eyebrow?

    This is due to nervous excitability of the dense collection of nerves activating muscles of the face. It in fact has a medical name: myokymia. It is somewhat common in folks in the middle years. It is benign and will not cause harm although it is sometimes annoying. Usually it is subtle and is felt but not observed by others. Occasionally larger muscle groups are involved and others can see the twitching. Most stop it by rubbing the area twitching but recurrence is the rule for a while but eventually it will stop. A few have reported that eating ice cream or sucking on ice cubes can stop the twitching. Rarely it is so annoying and obvious that the patient wants something done about it. The remedy in this rare occurrence is to inject Botox into the muscle groups doing the twitching. But again, this is a last resort for this completely benign condition. READ MORE

  • Is a fentanyl IV safe during cataract eye surgery?

    Fentanyl is a powerful anti-pain medication with respiratory depression as a possible side effect. It is safe as long as the patient is monitored for breathing and oxygen saturation with a trained nurse anesthetist or anesthesiologist at the bedside during the procedure. Cataract surgery is generally pain free and so the need for fentanyl would raise questions as to what is happening during this procedure.   READ MORE

  • Cryotherapy or laser treatment for retinal tears?

    Presumably, you have seen a retina surgeon who will make this choice for you. Laser provides pin point accuracy, but takes multiple applications to achieve the desired result. Cryo is less discriminate, treating a broader area but takes less time although it can be slightly uncomfortable. In both cases, the goal is to force the retina to seal itself down and prevent progression of a peripheral tear. The long-term results of both are probably equal. It is a choice you will not have to make which is why we rely on the expertise of our sub-specialists in medicine. READ MORE

  • For how long does Uveitis lasts?

    Depends. The majority of cases of uveitis are in the anterior portion of the eye, are spontaneous, and will respond readily to topical medication with resolution in 1-3 weeks. Some are caused by trauma and may last longer. Some are associated with systemic diseases like ankylosing spondylitis and these can be more severe and last longer. Others affect the back of the eye; these can be more persistent and require advanced medication for treatment. Your ophthalmologist can advise you about the type you have.  READ MORE

  • Should I take blood pressure medicine with glaucoma?

    Issues within the eye are independent of systemic blood pressure values. You should continue all systemic medications as required by your family doctor and of course take the anti-glaucoma medications as well. If you have glaucoma, it is best managed by an ophthalmologist and not by an optometrist.   READ MORE

  • How do pigmentation and a nevus differ?

    Pigmentation is a generic term which indicates normal or unnatural deposition of pigment on or in some part of the body. It conveys no information about the normality of the pigmentation, whether it is a risk, or anything else. Tattoos are a form of pigmentation. A nevus is a growth which most commonly is pigmented - usually in the brownish spectrum. What you have most likely is a nevus of the choroid which is the tissue underlying the retina in the back of the eye. Some call these a freckle as they are very similar to freckles or moles on the skin. They are almost always benign although most ophthalmologists will look at them once every year or so to see if they change in any way. They do not affect the health or vision of the eye. If your eye doctor took a picture of this, ask for a copy which you can show to anyone in the future who might look at your eye for changes. READ MORE

  • What can cause vessel damage to the eyes?

    If you can see the blood in the front of the eye, which seems to be the case, this then is a subconjunctival hemorrhage. The conjunctiva is a clear membrane overtop of the white sclera that is the outer wall of the eye. Occasionally, a vein will leak a tiny amount of blood, which spreads over a broad area as the conjunctival is otherwise adherent to the sclera. This is rarely a problem - only if it keeps recurring. It is due to temporary elevation of the pressure in the vein from coughing, sneezing, strenuous activity or rubbing the eye. If the vision is unaffected, which is usually the case, then just wait 5-10 days for the blood to absorb. In the meantime, you can make up a story for your friends about your "bloody eye" such as, "You should see the other guy." READ MORE

  • Are eye floaters normal in excessive sunlight?

    Floaters are membraneous fragments or debris scattered in the vitreous cavity behind the lens and in front of the retina. They are usually benign, but can be annoying. They are highlighted in bright light which is why you see them in the bright sun. A few floaters are common and not a problem from a health standpoint of the eye, but if you get many all at once, you should see an ophthalmologist as that can indicate more serious problems.   READ MORE

  • What does pigmented lattice mean?

    The retina coats the inside of the back of the eye and is the film upon which light is focused so we can see. The retina is one size fits all at birth so as the eye grows as the body grows after birth, the retina gets stretched a little in its periphery. Mostly the retina can handle this.  But in some cases the retina senses that the stretching is too much and a tear or hole is likely if it continues (which it will as long as growth continues). The response of the retina to this is to lay down scar tissue as a sort of glue to keep the retina from tearing at this overstressed place. This can be of many configurations, but a common one is parallel bands of pigment described by an early ophthalmologist who saw it as similar to the lattice work in a wall or a slatted fence. So, he called this lattice change or lattice degeneration. While this is there to prevent damage to the retina, it is also an area of weakness and retinal detachments occasionally originate at the lattice location. This is especially more likely to happen in the case of ocular trauma. When discovered this is usually ignored because most cause no problem. Your grandmother is unlikely to engage in activities that might cause ocular trauma (like boxing, construction work, high speed racing, etc.), so she probably will have no problem from this condition. READ MORE

  • What causes pigmentation of one's subretina?

    Pigmentation of the subretina is normal. It is present in a tissue termed the choroid and probably in part serves to absorb stray light which sharpens the image. If there is retinal disturbance or injury, sometimes extra pigment is deposited in response, so this can be a clue to a history of this type of change. Apparently, yours was a benign form and the ophthalmologist who saw this did not think it represented pathology that needed medical or surgical therapy. READ MORE

  • Why am I seeing flashes in my eye?

    This is likely to be changes in the vitreous material which fills the back of the eye. If you are seeing in addition many floating objects in the vision or if your actual vision has changed, then you should consult with an ophthalmologist (MD). There are a few other conditions which can give the phenomenon you describe, especially what is termed visual migraines. If any of these symptoms are persistent, then see your ophthalmologist.   READ MORE

  • Why is my eyelid twitching?

    Eyelid twitching that you describe is common enough that it has its own name - myokymia. It is felt to be due to nervous instability of some fibers of the bundle of nerves that control the eyelid and facial muscles. It is most common in the middle years, is usually subtle enough that the patient who has it feels it but it is not seen. Occasionally, however, it involves more muscles and can be observed by others. It does not come from any pathology and leads to no pathology.  Most handle it by rubbing the twitching lid which frequently will stop the twitching. Rarely, it is so often and so prominent that the patient wants more than reassurance. In those cases, a little Botox injection will usually stop it for many months and sometimes completely. Hopefully yours is the subtle for which will eventually go away on its own. READ MORE

  • My son's eyes are red and sensitive to light. What can be the cause?

    There are many possible causes. The most common would be an infection like "pink eye." There are more ominous internal causes termed uveitis, which can cause these same symptoms. If your child just started with this, and especially if classmates or friends have the same problem, it is likely a short-term infection. If it lasts longer the several weeks, you should seek out an ophthalmologist (not an optometrist) to have this evaluated. READ MORE

  • What is the cause of eye twitching?

    I assume you are talking about twitching of the eyelid which is by far the most common. The eye very rarely might twitch, but that is very handicapping as it causes the world viewpoint to jump with each contraction. Lid twitching is common in young to middle aged folks. It is interpreted as a non-stimulus firing of the nerves to the muscles of the lid. In most cases, it is subtle and can only be felt by the person having this happen. Less commonly, it may produce a visible twitch. Generally, these last a few moments and are controlled by rubbing the lid.  There is no known trigger and no pharmacological or manipulative way to prevent these. A few have them so often that they become bothersome. In such cases, Botox can be injected to prevent further occurrence but there are side effects to this which should be discussed with your ophthalmologist prior to having this done. READ MORE

  • Why am I having trouble focusing my eyes?

    You did not mention your age. The most common cause of headaches actually related to the eyes (most headaches are unrelated to the eyes) is underlying hyperopia (a need for glasses). As one ages, this becomes more of an issue and eventually also causes difficulty with near vision termed presbyopia. Your best bet is to set up an appointment with an ophthalmologist to have this worked out.  READ MORE

  • How successful is LASIK?

    LASIK has over a 99% success rate. You might want to quibble about the definition of "success". LASIK surgeons aim for perfect distance vision - no eyeglasses needed afterwards. And usually achieve this. A few are off target and a redo termed enhancement can be done for improvement. There are some serious problems you will discover on an internet search - almost all of these are from the early machines (check the dates).  Current machines are 4th generation with most of these problems corrected. Post procedure eye dryness can occur and many get LASIK due to contact lens discomfort from dry eyes and they are at higher risk. If you qualify on the basis of your eye power and general eye health, you have an extremely high chance of success. READ MORE

  • Can an ophthalmologist perform cataract surgery?

    Ophthalmologists are the usual ones to perform cataract removal. Optometrists cannot and do not have the training for surgery on the eye  If your mother is seeing an ophthalmologist then she is likely in good hands. This is a highly successful procedure with generally excellent results.   READ MORE

  • Is it safe to use rose water on my eyes?

    As long as the solution in which the rose scent was suspended is pure without contaminants or infectious agents, it is safe to use this as you have been doing. READ MORE

  • When is a vitrectomy used?

    Vitrectomy is an operative procedure in which special instrumentation is used to clear out material in the back of the eye which is diseased or damaged.  Generally the patient is asleep and the procedure typically takes 45 minutes to 1 1/2 hour. Commonly at the same time associated procedures may be done to stabilize the tissues at the back of the eye with laser, cryo and various mechanical inserted aids.   Vitrectomy is performed most commonly for retinal detachments and for bleeding in the back of the eye.  It frequently is done in advanced diabetic change in the eye when bleeding is a complication.  Trauma common requires vitrectomy as well.  There are other indications but these are the most common.  Your mother, if she has had such a recommendation, has probably consulted with a retinal surgeon which is the subspecialist who does this type of surgery.  Hopefully he/she has explained the condition of the eye to her and why vitrectomy might be helpful as well as the recovery and results to be expected.   READ MORE

  • What causes Behcet's disease in a person and how can it be treated?

    Behcet's disease is in the auto-immune spectrum. You can read about it with the following link: https://www.merckmanuals.com/professional/musculoskeletal-and-connective-tissue-disorders/vasculitis/beh%C3%A7et-disease/?network=g&matchtype=e&keyword=behcet%27s%20disease&creative=194484454716&device=c&devicemodel=&placement=&position=1t2&campaignid=296894295&adgroupid=20734785015&loc_physical_ms=9033344&loc_interest_ms=&gclid=EAIaIQobChMIy8HQ_u_M3QIVGNlkCh2qdwleEAAYAiAAEgL4X_D_BwE  READ MORE

  • Why do I have eye watering after a cataract surgery?

    You do not state whether the watering is one, or both eyes nor how long it has been since the surgery. Excess watering can be the eyes attempt to help healing by clearing out debris from the front of the eye. This is usually short-term. Less commonly, it might reflect a disruption of the tear drainage "plumbing." The best bet is to return to the surgeon who removed the cataract(s) and find out what the cause is. Watering is generally good and healthful and is far better than its opposite, which is deficient watering.   READ MORE

  • I have a problem driving at night. Is there any way to fix it?

    Hopefully you are wearing eyeglasses with the best current correction. There are a few visual disorders which impact night vision and I assume you have been checked for these.  The most common, early cataracts, will cause some glare at night, which can be a problem. You did not indicate your age, so I am not sure if you are in the older, cataract-likely age.  Check with your ophthalmologist to resolve, and define, these issues.  READ MORE

  • How does accentrix work?

    Accentrix is one of a class of agents that are called VEGF inhibitors. When circulation is compromised at or near the macula, it sends out a signal that stimulates the growth of new, but seriously abnormal vessels likely to lead and bleed. Accentrix will block this signal and cause atrophy of the abnormal vessels and limits the damaging effects caused by those vessels.   READ MORE

  • I accidentally slept in my contacts. Can just once cause permanent damage?

    Sleeping in contacts can lead to an overwear temporary change in the eyes usually due to oxygen deficiency. This can cause irritation, pain, redness and less commonly lid swelling.  These are all temporary and usually takes 1-2 days to disappear. No permanent changes result if this is all that happened. Rarely, an infection might occur - causing redness that is generalized, pain and sometimes lowered vision. Looking in the mirror you might notice a white dot on the cornea (the window at the front of the eye upon which the contact lens rests). If this is noted, see an ophthalmologist right away. Otherwise if the symptoms disappear in 2 days then, you can go back to your usual contact lens schedule. Of course, don't wear the lens until the eye clears.   READ MORE

  • How can I protect my eyes while working in front of the computer for close to 8 hours a day?

    Computer use is not harmful. It is tiring and especially drying. The dryness relates to the fact that the normal blink rate is about 16 per minute and drops to 5-6 per minute when using the computer which enhances drying. I recommend to those who have to do sustained computer work, to keep a drop of ordinary lubricating eye drops at the computer site to be used when you get fatigued, headachy, irritable eyes, red eyes or visual blur. I like to emphasize that the employees at Apple who are on the computer steadily 10-14 hours per day, have no more actual eye problems than do the rest of us that use computers intermittently. READ MORE

  • My eyelids are suddenly blinking a lot and then it settles on its own. What causes it?

    While there are many possibilities, the most likely is that your eyes have become somewhat dry. The blinking is to spread what tears you have over the drying surface. Once that is done, the signal to blink ends leading to what you feel is "settling." But the dryness underlies this, comes up again and the process repeats itself. You can try to interrupt this process by using lubricating eye drops to break the pattern. If it persists after that, then see an ophthalmologist to see if there is another problem. READ MORE

  • What should I do for the continuous sticky discharge from my eyes?

    If the vision remains fine and the eyes are not red and/or painful, then this is probably a reflection of eye dryness. Start by adding a 1/8 inch or so ribbon of plain eye ointment each night before sleeping to each eye. This may correct the problem. If not , add artificial, over the counter tears during the day. If still persistent, then see an ophthalmologist. READ MORE

  • My mother is highly diabetic and is not able to see very clearly. Could it be the onset of glaucoma?

    Your mother is at high risk for visual problems due to her age and her long-standing diabetes. She certainly would benefit from an examination by an ophthalmologist fairly soon (not an optometrist). If she is lucky, she would just need a new pair of eyeglasses. Diabetes can create significant retinal problems which can lower the vision - treatment is available for this. She is at risk for age-related cataracts, which can be fixed nicely. She is at risk for age-related macular degeneration. Glaucoma is of course a possibility, but these others are more likely. She needs an evaluation. READ MORE

  • Why do some people have dry eyes?

    Any disease will have a time of onset, and a common question physicians face is why did this happen to me? Tears are a combination of salty liquid, mucin (a lubricant), and oils which float on top of the tears and minimize evaporation. Older folks will notice that their skin is getting drier which changes the surface character and feel due to lower oils and moisturizing substances produced by the underlying tissue. Eyes have the same issue over the years with the final pathway being tears that are less voluminous, and which evaporate more readily due to lowered mucin and oils. It is more common in women and the symptoms are variable depending upon how serious it is and the tolerance of each patient. So, symptomatic dry eyes are distributed due to these characteristics and tolerance is quite variable. I don't know how old your mom is, but women have this problem more often. A combination of these problems for tears and for the skin around the eyes leads to what is happening to your mom. There is no cure, but lubricating eye drops and skin creams can attenuate the appearance and discomfort. Most of these treatments are over the counter, but there are some prescription medications also available although their effectiveness is variable. I assume she has seen an ophthalmologist and has been started on things to help with this. READ MORE

  • My eyes are red and itching badly. Why is this happening?

    These are certainly all the hallmarks of allergic response. If the vision is normal and there is no pain, then you can try to self treat. Over the counter anti-allergic drops like Zaditor or Naphcon-A actually work well. A systemic allergy pill like chlorpheniramine can also be of use, but remember the side effect of these which is sleepiness so take the first one at night. Rarely one discovers the source of the allergy, but most times it is an unknown exposure. You can play detective if there is repetition. If the vision is down or there is pain, then consult with an ophthalmologist.  READ MORE

  • What is the reason for constant watering of the eyes?

    Intermittent watering of eyes is usually due to dryness. If your mother has constant watering, assuming the vision is stable and the eyes are not red, then a likely cause is obstruction of the tear outflow lacrimal drainage system (the exit plumbing of the eyes). This should be evaluated by an ophthalmologist who can examine the outflow and see where the obstruction is located and whether treatment can be helpful. READ MORE

  • I have a blood clot in my eyes. Is it serious?

    Need more information for a specific answer. Where is the clot? Is it inside the eye or on the surface? Are you on blood thinners? If inside, is it in the front or the back? Are you a diabetic?  Or have sickle cell anemia?  Blood in or on the eye varies from benign to serious. If you have seen an ophthalmologist about this, you probably have, or are close to the answer. If you simply have seen blood on the eye surface and have not seen a consultant about this, it is far more likely to be benign. READ MORE

  • Is there a way to treat cataract without surgery?

    The problem with the development of cataract is that the structure of the lens inside the eye has lost its transparency in an irreversible way. There is no way to reverse that, and so surgery is the only option.  Cataract surgery is pain free, and one of the most successful of all operations as the parts of the surgery are extremely well controlled and predictable. Diabetics commonly develop cataracts in older age and there is no additional risk to surgery in this group with well controlled diabetes. Dense cataracts prevent viewing of the back of the eye, and cataract removal in diabetics is sometimes necessary when there are diabetic changes in the back termed "diabetic retinopathy". There is a small increased risk if the cataract removal is delayed and becomes advanced, so do not put this off.   READ MORE

  • My son is 3 years old and has developed cataract. What should I do?

    I am guessing that you have already had this evaluated by a pediatric ophthalmologist. Are you certain the cataract is one eye only? Is the eye otherwise normal? Do not work with an optometrist on this as these conditions are way beyond their training and experience. An eye blocked by a cataract will gradually lose vision unless the cataract is removed. This is not an emergency - there is plenty of time for the right decisions to be made. The options and treatments constitute a long list and it is better to have the pediatric ophthalmologist answer these questions. I don't know where you are located but most medical centers with an ophthalmology department will have a pediatric specialist. Larger cities may have one in independent practice as well. Hopefully you have made this contact already. READ MORE

  • Is stopping restasis considered to be dangerous?

    Restasis increases tear flow by minimizing (treating) inflammation that lowers tear flow. Stopping its use might diminish your tear flow if the underlying cause of inflammation is still present, but it might actually demonstrate that the inflammation is gone due to no change in the tear flow when stopped. There are no other observable effects from stopping the Restasis and there are plenty of alternatives if the tear flow diminishes when you stop this product. You may safely stop Restasis and will not get into any trouble by this stoppage. READ MORE

  • Why are my eyes blood red when I wake up?

    Computer work is drying and that is the cause for almost all related symptoms. Computers are in dry atmospheres. When you do concentrated work, your blink rate drops from 16 to 6 per minute which increases drying. The symptoms are many and include fatigue, blur, headaches, irritation, eye redness and lack of concentration. I recommend that an eye dropper bottle of eye tear replacement fluid be next to your computer to apply whenever you have any of these symptoms. These carry over at night and that is why you wake up with eye redness and fatigue. Helpful for this is to apply pain eye ointment into each eye just before going to sleep, which will usually stop the problem you are describing. Note that computer use is not harmful and all symptoms from sustained use are short term and totally reversible. READ MORE

  • Does not wearing glasses all the time increase eye power?

    It is a common misconception that wearing eyeglasses for clarity, will cause some change in the eyes leading to worse corrective need in the future. There is a natural progression of corrective need generally through the 20s in age with stability in the 30s. This will happen whether or not the eyeglasses are worn. Wear them if they help with clarity but they will have no effect on future needs. READ MORE

  • Does ADHD medication lead to astigmatism as a side effect?

    There is no relationship between this class of medications and the development of astigmatism. In fact, there is no known medication that will cause astigmatism. READ MORE

  • My eyes feel very dry after LASIK. What could be the cause for this?

    Dryness of the eyes occurs frequently after LASIK surgery. Many have LASIK because they have become less tolerant of their contact lenses due to underlying eye dryness. The procedure itself, cuts across nerves which are involved in the detection of surface eye dryness. Most regenerate but a certain percentage do not, and if the recovery is below your dryness threshold, you will experience dryness afterwards. Some will find improvement in this over a period of 3 months but dryness beyond that point can be long lasting. To start things out, try using Refresh or Systane (over the counter) eye drops as needed for your symptoms. There are other options which you can discuss with your LASIK surgeon. Hopefully you will be one of those that regenerates the proper amount of dryness detection nerves and will have no problem in the future.   READ MORE

  • My eye looks different because of my astigmatism. Anything I can do?

    It is hard to image astigmatism altering the eye appearance to a noticeable extent. Even those with astoundingly high astigmatism have a normal appearing eye. There must be some other thing you are noticing. Check with an ophthalmologist to see if there is something else going on to make this change. READ MORE

  • Constant eye floaters--what's wrong?

    Floaters - benign particles that appear in the visual space -are common over the years. Unless there is a change in the vision, or the floaters are too numerous to count, then they usually are annoying but benign. It would be worthwhile to have an ophthalmologist examine the back of your eye(s) to see if there is any cause. READ MORE

  • Can eyesight ever get better on its own?

    As your eye grows (and your body grows) there will be changes in the eye power (need for eyeglasses) at a slower and slower rate through the mid twenties. After that it usually is stable. Correction by eyeglasses and contacts can be used as this changes and when you get to be over about 23 years of age, LASIK correction can be considered. READ MORE

  • I can't stand to wear contacts

    There are several possibilities. The most common would be eye dryness. There are a few conditions that alter the shape of the cornea (the window of the front of the eye that the contacts sit upon) and that might be a problem. You might make an appointment with a corneal specialist who can evaluate these possibilities. READ MORE

  • What is the reason for double vision following an accident?

    Doubling of vision following head trauma can occur because of destabilization of previously unrecognized tendency for the eyes to get out of alignment; or due to damage to the muscles or nerves that are involved in eye motion. For either of these events, you should make an appointment with a specialist called a Neuro-ophthalmologist who deal with the interaction between the brain and eye function including eye motion. READ MORE

  • Why are my eyes so sensitive to light?

    Light sensitivity varies but all folks take a bit of time to adjust to the light after being in the dark.  This process is variable and some seem little bothered but others have a long adjustment period.  You seem to be on that end of the spectrum.  It is more pronounced in those with light colored eyes (are yours blue?).  If you have ever gone in a car through a tunnel, look near the exit and you will notice many more lights than in the middle of the tunnel.  This allows your eyes to light adapt before exiting into sunlight which otherwise could be dazzling and lead to accidents. READ MORE

Residency

  • Moffitt Hosp Univ Of Ca, Ophthalmology; Barnes-Jewish Hosp-S Campus, Ophthalmology; Johns Hopkins Hosp, Flexible Or Transitional Year  

Dr. Richard E Bensinger M.D.'s Practice location

Richard Bensinger

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Seattle, WA 98104
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Head west 16 ft
Make a slight left 146 ft
Turn right onto Minor Avenue 765 ft
Turn left onto Seneca Street 712 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the left

SWEDISH MEDICAL CENTERl

747 BROADWAY SEATTLE WA 98122

Head west 16 ft
Make a slight left 146 ft
Turn left onto Minor Avenue 154 ft
Turn left onto Marion Street 740 ft
Turn right onto Broadway 337 ft
Turn right 197 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the right

HARBORVIEW MEDICAL CENTERl

325 9TH AVENUE SEATTLE WA 98104

Head west 16 ft
Make a slight left 146 ft
Turn left onto Minor Avenue 1070 ft
Turn right onto James Street 968 ft
Turn left onto 9th Avenue 615 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the right