Dr. Lee Wittenberg, DPM, Podiatrist (Foot and Ankle Specialist)

Dr. Lee Wittenberg, DPM

Podiatrist (Foot and Ankle Specialist) | Foot & Ankle Surgery

8530 West Sunset Road 345 Las Vegas NV, 89113

About

Dr. Lee Wittenberg is a board certified podiatrist practicing in Las Vegas, NV. Dr. Wittenberg is the ONLY Foot & Ankle surgeon in Las Vegas board certified by 2 different surgical boards in foot surgery and in reconstructive foot and ankle surgery, being certified by the American Board of Lower Extremity Surgery and the American Board of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Dr. Wittenberg is a medical doctor specializing in the treatment of the foot , ankle and related parts of the leg. As a podiatrist, Dr. Wittenberg diagnoses and treats conditions of the feet. The feet are key body parts that give a person stability, absorb shock, allow for walking and standing and are necessary for overall well-being. So, the feet need expert care. Specialize in reconstructive foot and ankle surgery requires a great deal of understanding of the body's biomechanics. Dr. Wittenberg also is a specialist in wound care and limb salvage, sports medicine, diabetic care and pediatrics.

Education and Training

Ohio College of Podiatric Medcine DPM 2000

Board Certification

American Board of Lower Extremity Surgery

Foot Surgery (Podiatric Surgery)

Reconstructive Rearfoot / Ankle Surgery (Podiatric Surgery)

Provider Details

Male English, Spanish
Dr. Lee Wittenberg, DPM
Dr. Lee Wittenberg, DPM's Expert Contributions
  • Plantar Fasciitis - Heel Pain

    The most common cause of heel pain that I see in my practice is caused by a pathology called ‘Plantar Fasciitis.’  People usually come in complaining of pain on the inside of their heel or along the bottom of the arch that came on suddenly. Symptoms usually consist of pain that starts with the...

  • Hallux Rigidus/Hallux Limitus

    There are 2 types of hallux limitus: 1) Structural and 2) Functional. A structural hallux limitus is due to the development of arthritis (a decrease in the cartilage between 2 bones in a joint), which includes spurring or bone growth around the joint, most obvious at the top of the 1st...

  • Metatarsalgia: Pain At the Ball of the Foot

    It is very common for us to see patients complaining of pain in the balls of the feet and toes. There are many contributing factors and several pathologies which commonly cause this type of pain. Problems that we see include Neuromas (Nerve impingements at the ball of the foot), Capsulitis/joint...

  • Plantar Fasciitis

    The most common cause of heel pain that I see in my practice is caused by a pathology called ‘Plantar Fasciitis.’  People usually come in complaining of pain at the inside of their heel or along the bottom of the arch that came on suddenly.  Symptoms usually consist of pain that starts with...

  • Does tendonitis ever fully heal?

    It depends on how damaged the tendon is. Was an MRI performed? Where there any tears or irregularities in the substance of the tendon? Have you, as a patient, been asked to be in a boot or cast? Have you been asked to rest? Have you been given anti-inflammatory medications? Were you compliant with the treatment plan?? Many patients take pills or are told to be minimally active and use assistive devices, such as walking boots, crutches, casts, and other items, to alleviate stress off the tendon and allow for healing to occur. Many patients are non-compliant with such things, and without alleviated stress off the tendon, the problem does not improve, or worsens. This being said, tendons are very dysvascular structures (they do not have a good blood supply), and healing is never 'quick' with such problems, even if surgery is performed. READ MORE

  • Can you have surgery for nerve pain?

    It really depends on why you have nerve pain. 'Neuropathy,' which is a condition in which the nerves start to send abnormal signals to the brain, and other nerve-related pain such as CRPS/RSD (Complex Regional Pain Syndrome/Reflex Sympathetic Dystrophy) are very complicated to treat, and in the case of CRPS/RSD, NO SURGERY SHOULD EVER BE PERFORMED, or the problem may become worse. For nerve pain related to radiculopathy (impingement of nerves for various reasons at the spinal cord and spinal column), there may be nerve ablation surgery or even spinal cord stimulators which may decrease pain surgically. However, nerve pain is very tricky, and you must insure you are having procedures performed by competent, board certified physicians. In the foot and ankle, there are surgical nerve releases throughout the leg that may be performed for Neuropathic pain, but often they are unsuccessful. And finally, there are nerve releases and repairs that may be done for carpal tunnel, tarsal tunnel, and pathologies such as Neuromas. READ MORE

  • How can you tell the difference between a fracture and a dislocation?

    A fracture is a break in a bone. A dislocation is when bones separate at a joint level. READ MORE

  • What is the fastest way to heal an ankle dislocation?

    A true ankle dislocation is associated with tendon and ligament issues/tears/ruptures, and often has bone issues (fractures or osteochondral defects) associated with the pathology. Initial treatment may be immobilization in a boot or a cast. But an MRI MUST be performed to asses the true damage to the ligaments, tendons, and bones associated with the dislocation. And most ankle dislocations are also associated with fractures of the ankle, and many of these require surgical intervention. READ MORE

  • How do you manage bone spurs?

    'Bone Spurs' is a waste basket term-a term misused and too commonly used by patients and other physicians. What you probably mean is 'heel spurs,' but you have not specified. An actual bone spur is often caused by a periosteal reaction of the bone, which stimulates new bone growth, often around a joint or a ligament or tendon attachment. Some of these spurs need to be surgically removed. Sometimes they are largely cosmetic and do not cause the patient pain. Sometimes you are referring to plantar fasciitis, which actually has nothing to do with the bone spur associated with that pathology. READ MORE

  • What causes bone pain in the foot?

    There are many things that cause bone pain in your foot. If you have had a trauma, a fracture or contusion may cause bone pain. Arthritis may cause pain in the bones and joints of the feet. A bone tumor or cyst could cause pain in the bones of the feet. There are also many muscles, tendons, and ligaments in the foot, along with nerves and blood vessels. The foot and ankle are exceptionally complicated structures. It is impossible to answer such a generalized question, but you should see a specialist for further evaluation. READ MORE

  • How do I help my son who's ankle surgery is delayed?

    Most people do not require surgery to repair a sprained ankle. Especially in a 10 year old boy. Most ankle sprains are handled conservatively with a cast, a walking boot, and/or an ankle brace for several weeks to several months, if necessary. The only indication for surgery would be if the ankle was actually fractured and displaced, or if it was a fracture at a certain level on the fibula. If it was a simple sprain, the first course of action is to immobilize the patient in a walking boot or a cast, and then move to physical therapy modalities. If the patient does not improve after a couple months, an MRI must be performed in order to determine if a ligament is actually ruptured and needs to be repaired. Otherwise, surgery is NOT indicated. Rest, Ice, Elevation, Immobilization. That's it. READ MORE

  • How can my daughter manage a broken toe without surgery?

    Most digital fractures and many other fractures do not require surgery to heal. Immobilization in a walking boot or cast (not for a digital fracture) is often all that is necessary, with rest and time away from athletics or heavy activity. There are several determining factors in deciding whether a fracture requires surgery, including the amount of gap between fracture fragments (should not exceed more than 2mm), rotation/angulation/or displacement of the fracture, which may cause the bone to heal in an abnormal position, or fractures in areas of low blood flow, or the healing potential may be lower than normal for other reasons. But digital fractures are usually just splinted to the toe(s) that they are next to, limit activity/rest, ice it when it is painful, take anti-inflammatories for pain, and it should heal fine if it is not displaced much. READ MORE

  • How do you know a child's foot is broken?

    You can not tell if a person has a fracture without x-rays. Signs that it may be broken are the inability to bear weight, but sometimes patients can still bear weight and walk with a fracture. You should take him in for evaluation by a specialist READ MORE

  • Can nerve damage be repaired in the foot?

    Nerve damage and nerve pain are difficult things to evaluate, to treat, and it really depends what the cause of your never 'damage' is. If a nerve is lacerated, it can not be repaired unless it is done very quickly after an injury. But there are many other kinds of 'damage' and nerve injuries. Your question is not specific enough to give a clear answer READ MORE

  • How do you test for ankle instability?

    Ankle instability is tested clinically by putting the ankle through 2 different tests: 1) Anterior Drawer test 2) Talar Tilt test. These can also be done under fluoroscopy or under plain film radiology. Further testing is done by performing an MRI to see if ligaments are sprained (stretched out) or ruptured (torn completely or partially). It is also decided based on frequency of patient ankle sprains and a 'feeling' by the patient of instability and that they are frequently feeling as if they are going to sprain the ankle, or they are afraid to do things because they frequently sprain their ankles READ MORE

  • When should you see a doctor for foot pain?

    You should see a physician for your pain if the pain lasts for more than 2-3 weeks, if the pain came after a trauma or contusion, or if pain is worsening and not improving. There is not a real definitive answer to this question because different pathologies present differently. Gout or an infection, for example, is something that you should see a doctor for immediately. READ MORE

  • Should you wear a walking boot for a sprained ankle?

    It really depends on how severe the sprain is and what your symptoms are like after the sprain. But you should at least have it evaluated as at least 30% of ankle sprains are associated with ankle fracture READ MORE

  • How long does it take for heel pain to heal?

    It is dependent on what type of heel pain/what the pathology is that is causing the heel pain. A stress fracture, for example, will take 6-8 weeks to heal with protected weight bearing (a walking boot or cast with non-weight bearing). Plantar fasciitis, the most common type of heel pain, may become pain-free very quickly with injections or oral anti-inflammatory medication, but may recur if you don't treat the condition properly. Achilles tendonitis can be painful for many months. And some of these conditions may not improve without surgery. So there are many types/causes of heel pain, and there are many variables to consider. READ MORE

  • How successful is plantar fasciitis surgery?

    Plantar fascia surgery is usually not necessary if you and your physician are doing the correct things to conservatively treat the problem. There are many physicians who do the surgery, which consists of cutting the ligament near the heel (the plantar fascia). In 20 years of practice, I have only had to perform plantar fasciotomy on about 4-5 patients. So I actually don't think it is usually necessary. Cutting the ligament permanently destabilizes your arch and mechanically disrupts the proper function of the foot, leading to other problems down the road. READ MORE

  • How long does it take for a broken fibula to heal after surgery?

    All fractures take about 6-8 weeks to heal after surgery (6 weeks is 'normal' healing time). BUT, there will likely be swelling, stiffness, and possible need for physical therapy after surgery. Swelling may last for 6-12 months after surgery, but decreases steadily as you get further out from the date of surgical intervention READ MORE

  • Can you walk after ankle surgery?

    It depends on what type of ankle surgery you are having. But, generally, if you are having any kind of boney work done, you need to stay completely off the ankle for 4-8 weeks. If it is a simple arthroscopy, you may be allowed to walk in a walking boot right away or after 2-3 weeks. All of this is dependent on the type of surgery you are having and on your surgeon. You should seek advice directly from your surgeon about his expectations and requirements for his post-surgical care READ MORE

  • How to ice and heat a broken ankle?

    If the ankle is in a cast, the most effective way to cool the blood going to the area is to ice behind his knee. If there is no cast, ice directly over the area. Icing should be performed every 2 hours or so for 15-30 minutes. He should also elevated the leg and not put pressure on the foot or ankle-limit activity. READ MORE

  • Do acupressure slippers work for relieving pain?

    You need to have the cause of your pain looked into. Numbness can be caused by local neurologic problems to issues with your lumbosacral spine. Pain and inflammation may be caused by mechanical and positional issues with your foot and ankle. Accupressure slippers are a 'scam.' My suggestion: Go to a foot and ankle specialist and be evaluated by someone with medical and anatomic/physiologic training. That doctor will either order testing on you, or will attempt to help with his diagnosis after examination of your feet and ankles. READ MORE

  • What foot exercises can be done at home?

    As I have said before, unless you specify what the problem/pathology is, it is difficult to explain what exercises you can do at home for the problem. But most problems do have home physical therapy/exercises that can be performed at home. Calf raises, stretches, strengthening exercises, etc. READ MORE

  • How can I relieve foot pain?

    There are many causes of foot pain. From tendonitis to ligament problems to other soft tissue injuries, and from bone contusions to fractures and sprains, and from nerve problems to low back and spine issues. It is impossible for me to tell you how to get relief if we are unsure what is wrong with you. Go and be evaluated by a specialist. READ MORE

  • Is it ok to massage plantar fasciitis?

    It is actually good to massage the plantar fascia when you have plantar fasciitis, as it will help to stretch the ligament and alleviate the tension from the ligament. However, I have had many patients present to my office AFTER have an aggressive massage by a massage therapist or other type of therapist. So be careful about how deep or aggressive the massage is. READ MORE

  • Do you need to bring your child to the doctor if they fell off their bike?

    If the child has pain after an injury, or if the child's function has changed, you should absolutely have the child checked out. That is simply good parenting-making sure your child is ok after an injury. READ MORE

  • Can I walk a week after ankle surgery?

    You must consult with your surgeon to see if it is OK for you to bear weight and walk after surgery. It would be completely out of line for me to recommend activity level to any patient who is not my own surgical patient READ MORE

  • Does a torn ligament in the ankle require surgery?

    Sometimes a torn ligament requires surgery, and sometimes it does not. It depends on your symptoms and the stability of your ankle. If you feel stable, and you are not experiencing frequent sprains and are not in much pain, the ligament does not usually need to be surgically repaired. But if you feel like you are always going to sprain your ankle, and/or your are having a lot of pain in the ankle, you may need surgery. The only way to diagnostically diagnose a torn ligament is to have an MRI. You must have a positive MRI finding of torn ligaments before even considering such surgery. Look up lateral ankle instability, lateral ankle instability, Brostrom procedure/modified Brostrom procedure. READ MORE

  • Can being overweight cause ankle pain?

    Yes. Being overweight causes a great deal of stress to the joints, tendons, bones and ligaments. Being overweight also causes a wider stance of gait and weight bearing to accommodate a different center of gravity. This also may cause flat feet, knee and ankle pain, hip pain and low back pain. READ MORE

  • What is the best pain relief for plantar fasciitis?

    When you are dealing with plantar fasciitis, you are dealing with inflammation which is the cause of the pain. So, getting rid of inflammation is key to treating this problem. Cortisone injections, oral anti-inflammatories, and topical anti-inflammatories may assist in getting rid of your pain. But the problem is more complicated than that. READ MORE

  • What is the home remedy for ankle pain?

    It depends. Is it actually your ankle joint that hurts? Is it one of the many surrounding tendons? Is it the joint below the ankle-the Subtalar Joint? Is it your Tarsal Tunnel and possibly nerve irritation? There are many things that it COULD be, so designating a treatment protocol is difficult in this situation. However, the basic rule of thumb for an acute injury is RICE (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevation). You may supplement this with 600mg of Ibuprofen 3x per day, or 500mg of Naproxen twice a day to assist with ridding your body of pain and inflammation. READ MORE

  • Why does my foot randomly ache sometimes?

    Most occasional aches and pains are usually related to dysfunction of the foot/joints/tendons. Fatigue from your feet working to hard to function properly. I would start by supplementing my shoes with a good pre-fabricated orthotic/arch support, or to see if your insurance covers you for custom made orthotics. Simply wearing these and having your feet start to function better and more properly, this may solve your issues completely. READ MORE

  • How long does it take for nerves to heal after foot surgery?

    Nerves are not usually cut during surgery, but if a nerve is lacerated, the sensation and function from that nerve may never come back. Most people's nerves are stretched during the process of surgery, and this may result in temporary numbness. This temporary numbness may last for 2-6 months after surgery-sometimes longer, and many people have no numbness, whatsoever READ MORE

  • When should I see a doctor for heel pain?

    You should see a doctor for your heel pain if the pain is interfering with your daily activity level or other activities. READ MORE

  • Why does the bone under my big toe hurt?

    It is difficult to discern the cause of your pain without an examination. You could have arthritic changes of your first metatarsophalangeal joint, you could have a functional issue, you could have tendinitis, or you could even have distal plantar fasciitis. You may have sesamoiditis. You may have a combination of issues. It would be my suggestion to get your problem evaluated by a specialist. READ MORE

  • Are you awake for foot surgery?

    It depends on your insurance, your surgeon, and your anesthesiologist. It also depends on your comorbidities and other health issues. You will need to have clearance for surgery, and you can discuss anesthesia with your surgeon and your anesthesiologist prior to surgery. READ MORE

  • When do you see a doctor for a sore ankle?

    You can not 'sprain' an ankle from walking in tall heels. You can irritate tendons, ligaments and joints. But a sprain is a specific injury, and requires a trauma in order to stretch or rupture a ligament or other structure. You should see a physician if your pain persists for more than 1-2 weeks READ MORE

  • What can I do with my chronic foot pain?

    There are 28 bones and over 50 joints in the foot and ankle. There are multiple tendons, ligaments, and nerves. There are too many structures to give you a fair analysis of your foot pain without an examination or further, more detailed information. READ MORE

  • What to do right after twisting your ankle?

    RICE therapy is the best first-course of action for a sprain or injury to the foot or ankle. R= rest to allow the injury to rest and heal. I=ice to decrease inflammation and pain. C=compression (ACE wrap or ankle brace) to reduce swelling and pain and give support to the area. E=Elevation to decrease swelling and to allow rest. READ MORE

  • How long does it take to recover from a broken ankle?

    A non-displaced ankle fracture, like any non-displaced fracture, should be casted/immobilized for 6 weeks. That is normal physiologic time for healing a fracture/broken bone. But an ankle fracture needs careful evaluation. Many ankle fractures require surgical repair, and care needs to be take to evaluate the syndesmosis (the ligament that holds the Tibia and Fibula together) for proper stability. Failure to do so can lead to sever instability of the ankle after healing and can lead to more significant issues in the future. The fibular length and ankle mortice must be intact, also for proper stability. And your son should not bear weight on the affected foot/ankle for a minimum of 4-6 weeks. READ MORE

  • How to ease pain in my right ankle?

    It is difficult to discern what is wrong with you without more detail and without an examination. You could have ankle arthritis. You could have tendonitis. You could be pronating (a certain motion of the foot which usually looks like a flat foot) and the pain may not be related to the actual ankle joint, at all. Without seeking professional help to discern what your actual pathology is, it is impossible to give you advice on this issue. READ MORE

  • How do I know if my ankle injury is serious?

    If an ankle injury is very serious, you usually can not walk immediately on the foot/ankle associated with the injury. This could mean you fractured your ankle. However, sprains and ligament tears/ruptures are common with a simple ankle sprain or injury. Sometimes, soft tissue injuries actually take longer to heal than an actual fracture. If a patient comes to our clinic and the sprain was many months ago, but they are experiencing a great deal of pain, we may try conservative care to start (injections, ankle braces, compression, rest, etc), but if the problem persists, we send our patients for an MRI to rule out an osteochondral defect, ligament sprains or ruptures, or tendon pathologies that may result from such injuries. Depending on the pathology, the treatment may vary from conservative care to surgical intervention. READ MORE

  • The arch in my foot has lessened over time?

    It can be a sign of a tendon problem called "Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction." This is a progressive problem that moves through 4 stages. Are you having pain in your foot? Particularly the medial arch or along your medial ankle? If so, this may be a significant problem. Even if you do not have pain, arch supports will probably help with the problem, and stop it from progressing over time. READ MORE

  • Do they numb you for ingrown toenail surgery?

    The ingrown toenail "Surgery" is a minor procedure we do in the office. You can simply have the ingrown removed, or you can have the ingrown more permanently removed with a procedure called a Matricectomy-where we chemically destroy the growth cells on the side of the nail that is ingrowing. Either way, yes, we numb the toe. It would truly be barbaric not to. READ MORE

  • My heels are in pain all the time?

    It depends on what the pathology/diagnosis is. But there are several treatments for heel pain. Most commonly, the diagnosis is plantar fasciitis. The treatments include Cortisone injections, foot strappings, home PT programs, orthotics, and anti-inflammatory medications. Other pathologies require different types of treatments. READ MORE

  • Why does my ankle pop when I walk?

    In my experience, the 'popping' sensation or sound that can happen around a joint is usually a tendon sliding over a bone and clicking. If it is not painful, it is not something to be concerned about. But you might want to consider Orthotics for your shoes to help promote better alignment and function of your foot and ankle so that you are at less risk of injury in the future. READ MORE

  • Will I need surgery for a sprained ankle?

    Ankle sprains and soft tissue injury (like ligament sprains or ruptures) can take longer to heal than a fracture sometimes. If your ankle sprain involved an ankle FRACTURE, then you have about a 40-60% chance of needing surgery. If it is just ligament strain or rupture, you should have conservative treatment for at least 3 months, and if the pain has not resolved after a couple months, then have an MRI to evaluate the extent of the damage from the injury. But, no, most ankle 'sprains' do not need surgery READ MORE

  • Can a podiatrist perform surgery?

    Many Podiatrists are surgeons, but some are not. And, that being said, you should seek out a Well-Trained surgeon to evaluate and perform your surgery. Look for a 3-year residency trained Podiatrist or a 2-year trained Podiatrist with a 3rd year as a Fellowship, and look for a Podiatrist BOARD CERTIFIED in one of the 2 following boards: ABFAS (American Board of Foot & Ankle Surgeons) or ABLES (American Board of Lower Extremity Surgery). There will be other 'board certified' Podiatrists that are certified by a Non-Surgical board, and those doctors you want to stay far away from. Evaluate your doctors by patient evaluations on websites like this, or even through reasonably written Yelp reviews. READ MORE

  • What's wrong with the bottom of my feet?

    That is really a difficult question to answer without either examining you or having more detail about the location of your pain. There are 33 joints, 28 bones, and tons of muscles and tendons in the foot and that cross the ankle and enter the foot. There are nerves everywhere. There are numerous ligaments. You will need to be more specific, or you may need to see a Podiatrist in your area READ MORE

  • I have twisted my ankle on a walk and don't know how to fix it?

    You should see a doctor. About 50-60% of ankle sprains have a fracture associated with it, and you must be evaluated ASAP to make sure the fracture is stable, and you don't create worse issues. READ MORE

  • Will toenail fungus go away on its own?

    Toenail fungus is difficult to get rid of, even with the appropriate medical treatment. If you let it go, it will likely worsen and spread into other toes. Home remedies do not usually work. See a physician. READ MORE

  • What are the symptoms of a bunion?

    A bunion is a deformity in which the Hallux (big toe) is laterally deviated and the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint. Most pain begins with pain at the medial eminence (the 'bump' at the inside of the forefoot) from rubbing on shoe gear. There may then begin to be joint pain with motion of the joint and activity. There are many other reasons for pain at the big toe. It could be an ingrowing toenail, arthritic or functional issues with the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint, tight or inappropriate shoes, and the list goes on. It is best to see a Podiatrist to evaluate what the issue actually is before deciding on a diagnosis or a treatment. READ MORE

  • My right foot has been hurting, what could it be?

    The most likely cause of your pain is called Plantar Fasciitis. It depends on how long the problem has been present and how much it is interfering with your activity that will decide if you should see a specialist for the problem, but podiatrists are very good at taking care of this problem READ MORE

  • How can I treat an ingrown toenail?

    It is unwise to try to treat your ingrown toenail at home. By the time they are very uncomfortable, they are often infected and need to be treated with oral antibiotics to get rid of the infection, and the offending nail border must be removed aggressively, or the infection will recur as soon as the course of antibiotics is finished. Soaking in Epsom salts or Dial antibacterial hand soap in warm water, then keeping the area covered with a band aid and topical antibiotic ointment is the best way to handle the problem until you can see a Podiatrist. There will be 2 choices of treatment at the Podiatrist's office: A removal of the offending border, or a more permanent removal of the side of the nail that is bothering you by doing a procedure called a Matricectomy in the office. This yields a good cosmetic result, and usually stops the edge that is bothering you from growing back. READ MORE

  • How can I treat an ankle that hurts?

    There are many reasons your ankle may be hurting. You could be compressing the cartilage in the ankle joint with high impact activity, like jumping and running. You may have a ligament issue around the ankle joint. Sometimes people feel the pain is in the ankle, but it is actually in the foot. If you would like to try treatment at home, remember this pneumonic: RICE. Rest (stop playing basketball for 2-4 weeks), Ice, Compression (ACE wrap or ankle brace), and elevation. You can also take non-steroidal anti-inflammatory medication, like Ibuprofen or Naproxen. But if the pain persists, go see a well-trained podiatrist. READ MORE

  • What causes toenails to be thick and yellow?

    Toenail fungus. Get it treated sooner than later. Over the counter medications are not very effective for the problem READ MORE

  • What can be the cause of my toe pain?

    If it is red, it is possible you could have an infection, and you should immediately see a medical professional or specialist so that your infection does not spread. You may have an ingrown toenail. It could be some other issue. READ MORE

  • Are high heels safe for my feet?

    High heels are not good for your feet. The more you wear them, the more problems you will have in the future with your feet. When you wear even a low heel, gravity pushes your toes into the toe box of the shoe, which, in turn, smashes your toes together both with medial to lateral pressure as well as with posterior to anterior pressure (what this means is your toes are being not only mashed together from side-to-side, but also pushed into the front of the shoe). These things contribute to Neuromas, hammer toes, bunions, Hallux rigidus, tendonitis, neuritis, and other problems. If you are going to wear heels, do so infrequently and look for shoes that are not too high in the heel and look for shoes that have a more round or squared off toe box. READ MORE

  • Why is there swelling on my foot?

    Any time I do surgery on a patient, I tell them to expect a minimum of 6 months to 1 year of post-operative swelling. The swelling gets better and better as you get further away in time from the date of surgery. HOWEVER, infections and wound dehiscence (when the surgical wound does not close) also cause inflammation and swelling. So you will have a longer period of swelling than an average surgical patient. READ MORE

  • What are the best creams for toenail fungus?

    Creams and topical remedies do not usually work well for toenail fungus. You can try many types of liquid over the counter medications, like 'funginail,' or you can go to a Podiatry office and buy 'Formula 3,' which has a money back guarantee. But if you use topical antifungals, you are looking at about 9 months to 2-3 years of application of the medication, usually with no results. The best way to treat toenail fungus is with oral antifungals prescribed by your Podiatrist. READ MORE

  • Is the pain in my toe because of an ingrown toenail?

    Ingrown toenails may definitely be a cause of toe pain. There are other causes of toe pain, however, and without seeing you as a patient, it is difficult to discern exactly what the problem is. If it is an ingrown toenail, you have to discern if it is infected or just painful because it is ingrown. Either way, the offending border must be removed to alleviate the infection, or to prevent a new infection. The best thing to do would be to make an appointment with a local Podiatrist in your area to have your problem evaluated and your treatment options explained. READ MORE

  • What are the treatment options for toe fungus?

    Toenail fungus is actually very difficult to get rid of, but is mostly a cosmetic problem, and will not necessarily cause any health problems. There are many over-the-counter remedies easily obtainable at pharmacies, and there are some home remedies that people talk about, but most of these treatments do not work. You can try an actual anti-fungal for nail fungus, Vick's Vaporub, Tea Tree oil, soaking in bleach, etc. But these have been innefective for my patients. The best treatment we have so far is an oral medication called Lamisil. Lamisil has been effective in about 80% of my patients in my 20 years of practice, but you do require a blood test prior to taking the medication, and there are certain contraindications, such as cholesterol lowering medications. Your best option is to see a local Podiatrist READ MORE

  • Why does the center of my foot hurt when I walk?

    It is very difficult to know where you mean by 'the center of my feet' without a physical examination. If you mean your arch, you could have plantar fasciitis or tendonitis. If you're talking about the ball of your foot, you could have a neuroma or a stress fracture. There are a multitude of possible diagnoses. You should seek the assistance of a well-trained Podiatrist. Orthotics may help your problem, but they must be made appropriately to treat the particular problem you have. The over-the-counter orthotics/arch supports are usually not very good, and are often a rip off (like the good feet store or foot solutions, where the people helping you are laymen, and not medical professionals. These types of stores charge you several hundred dollars for their devices that you can usually find on line for $25-$50. They tell you that the devises are 'custom made,' but they are off-the-shelf pre-fabricated devices that do not help very much READ MORE

  • What is the best way to treat ingrown toenails?

    It is unwise to try to treat your ingrown toenail at home. By the time they are very uncomfortable, they are often infected and need to be treated with oral antibiotics to get rid of the infection, and the offending nail border must be removed aggressively, or the infection will recur as soon as the course of antibiotics is finished. Soaking in Epsom salts or Dial antibacterial hand soap in warm water, then keeping the area covered with a band aid and topical antibiotic ointment is the best way to handle the problem until you can see a Podiatrist. There will be 2 choices of treatment at the Podiatrist's office: A removal of the offending border, or a more permanent removal of the side of the nail that is bothering you by doing a procedure called a Matricectomy in the office. This yields a good cosmetic result, and usually stops the edge that is bothering you from growing back. READ MORE

  • Why is one of my toes smaller than the others?

    The most likely answer is that you have a condition known as 'Brachymetatarsia.' This is a genetic condition in which one or more of the metatarsals (the long bones just before your toes) is too short in relation to the surrounding metatarsal bones, and thus, the toe is shorter. If it is painful, address it with a 3-year surgically trained and board certified Podiatrist. If it is not painful, don't worry about it. You can live with that condition with no issues or problems for your entire life READ MORE

  • Is there an effective way to remove and prevent corns?

    Corns and Calluses are 'pressure' lesions. They occur when the skin gets trapped between the bone and the shoe or the surface you are walking on. When most people refer to 'corns,' they are talking about a callus on the top of a toe, usually over the Proximal or Distal Interphalangeal Joint. There is usually a hammer toe that makes the top of the toe rub against the shoe. Corns can be trimmed, but they will always return if the deformity is not corrected (ie: straightening the hammer toe) or if the patient does not stop wearing shoes that press on the toe (ie: tight shoes like dressy shoes and high heels usually make the corns worse because they are tighter in the toe box and have less room for the toe/deformity). Straightening a hammer toe is a surgical procedure. READ MORE

  • What is Morton's neuroma?

    A Neuroma is an impingement of the plantar (bottom of the foot) nerves at the ball of the foot which may result in a bulbous and painful swelling and irritation of the nerve. Common symptoms are burning pain, pain at the ball of the foot, and tingling and numbness at the ball of the foot and sometimes into the toes. People often come in with strange sensations, such as a feeling of 'a sock or material bunched up under or between the toes.' Initial treatments for neuromas include injections with cortisone, oral anti-inflammatory medication, and biomechanical off-loading using orthotics and metatarsal pads. If conservative treatments are ineffective, patients may opt for a series of Alcohol sclerosing injections to shrink and kill the nerve, or surgical excision of the nerve. These treatments, however, are destructive (to the nerve) and often leave a patient with permanent numbness, so they are a last resort. Contributing factors are high heel, flat feet, and hammertoes. READ MORE

  • How do ingrown toenails get infected?

    All infections are caused by microorganisms (bacteria/fungi/viruses). In the case of an ingrown toenail, the nail, itself, is dirty, and if it penetrates the skin on the side of the nail, it can impregnate the area with microorganisms, causing infection. In your case, the instruments you used to 'dig it out' may have been dirty/contaminated, and you may have introduced the bacteria into the area by attempting your own treatment. READ MORE

  • Are orthotics enough for foot bunions?

    It depends on what you are referring to as a 'bunion.' Many of my patients call corns and calluses bunions-but that is not what a bunion is. A bunion is a deformity of the foot where the angle between the 1st and 2nd metatarsals increases, and the big to deviates laterally to the articulation of the 1st metatarso-phalangeal joint. Orthotics may slow the progression or prevent worsening of a bunion, but once a bunion is there, the only way to correct it is to have surgery. Look up Bunions. Look up Hallux Valgus (the medical term for bunion). READ MORE

  • Should I try to remove a toenail?

    If the nail is more than 90% lysed off the nail bed, you can remove the nail. Just make sure the area does not get infected (red/swollen/pus/pain). Keep the nail covered at all times with a band aid and antibiotic ointment (Neosporin) until the wound bed appears to be fully healed or has a stable scab. If there are signs of infection, see your primary doctor or a Podiatrist ASAP. READ MORE

  • Why is the top of my left foot swollen?

    There are many reasons for swelling, including injury, infection, stress fractures, and circulatory problems. The most common circulatory problem causing that type of swelling is Venous Insufficiency (commonly thought of as 'fluid retention'). There is no way to tell what is wrong without an examination READ MORE

  • What is the best way to eliminate foot odor?

    Foot odor is caused by bacteria and fungus. These problems are exacerbated by sweat. Spray your shoes with Lysol at least once a week and allow them to dry before wearing again. Treat any athlete's foot or fungal infections. Change your socks twice a day to eliminate sweat. Treat toenail fungus, if present. There are also over the counter treatments for hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating), like Certain Dry that you can use to try to decrease the amount of sweating that increases these bacterial and fungal counts READ MORE

  • Can you treat heel spurs at home?

    It depends on what you mean by a 'heel spur.' It sounds like you are talking about a deformity at the posterior heel where the Achilles Tendon inserts, based on your comment that it hurts in tight pumps. If that is the case, there are 2 possible problems (An Enthesis of your Achilles insertion or a Haglund's deformity (a 'Pump Bump)). You must stop wearing shoes that are too tight around the Achilles and alleviate the aggravating factors that are causing the pain. Oral and topical anti-inflammatories may help with the pain. Surgical treatment is sometimes necessary. If you are referencing a plantar heel spur (Plantar Fasciitis), there are other treatments necessary for that problem. READ MORE

  • What can I do about my nail infection?

    Removing your toenail will NOT actually eliminate the infection if you are referring to a toenail fungus. If you are talking about an ingrowing nail with an infected nail fold (a paronychia), you must have the offending portion of the nail removed. If it is a fungal nail infection, the best remedy is an oral medication called Lamisil. READ MORE

  • How are plantar warts caused?

    Plantar warts are caused by a virus (the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV). They are difficult to get rid of, as the virus lives in the deepest layer of your dermis. But sometimes patients come into the office thinking they have a wart, but it is another type of lesion. You should have it checked out. Viruses can live outside the human body for very long periods of time and can sit on floors, pool decks, or gym floors, and anywhere that people have walked barefoot. They do not become active until they enter a host cell. READ MORE

  • How can I reduce the growth of hammer toe?

    You can slow the progression of a hammer toe with appropriate shoe gear and orthotics, but it will likely continue to get worse over time. The only way to 'fix' a hammer toe is with surgical intervention. There are ways to make you comfortable with a hammer toe, even if you do not opt for surgery. But if the hammer toe is in its early stages, wearing appropriate shoes and orthotics (arch supports) may restore muscle balance to the point that the deformity resolves-but this would be rare. READ MORE

  • Can tight shoes cause corns on my feet?

    Shoes that are tight in the toe box cause corns, bunions and hammer toes. Hammer toes cause corns. Mechanical issues cause corns. Lee Wittenberg, DPM Apache Foot & Ankle Specialists 4840 S. Fort Apache Rd, Ste 101 Las Vegas, NV 89147 702-362-2622 2980 St. Rose Pkwy, Ste 140 Henderson, NV 89052 702-722-6633 READ MORE

  • Why do shoes give me a rash?

    It could only be the material or the dyes that you’re reacting to. It’s an allergic dermatitis. Figure out what the shoes are made and colored with. You can go to an allergist. Stop wearing that pair of shoes READ MORE

  • Why is my toe bleeding randomly?

    You most likely have an ingrown toenail or it may even be infected. See a podiatrist to havevit taken care of ASAP. READ MORE

  • What can I do for dry and cracked feet?

    The most common cause of fissures is hyperhidrosis and/or mechanical issues (the way your feet are moving in your shoes). There is an over-the-counter cream called ‘Amlactin’ that has a light acid that softens the skin. If the cracks are bad, I have my patients put the cream on at night and wrap their feet overnight in Saran Wrap for a week or 2. Then when you shower in the morning, g over the areas gently with a callus file or pumice stone. Once the problem calms down, you just put the cream on at night and don’t have to use Saran Wrap unless the problem flares up again. (there’s also a prescription version called ‘Ammonium Lactate’ and another with Urea). Also, you should have your shoes and gait evaluated by a Podiatrist. You may need orthotics to change the mechanics of your feet READ MORE

  • Why does my big toe hurt when I apply too much pressure?

    There are several common reasons your toe may hurt with pressure. Yes, an ingrown toenail may cause this type of pain. But so might a fungal infection of the nail that causes the nail to thicken and causes pressure on the underlying toe. Also, you could have a boney prominence forming under the nail which might cause pain in the area. There are other pathologies, also, which could cause this kind of pain. Without an examination, it is difficult to say what is causing your pain. READ MORE

  • Are there home remedies for foot fungus?

    This is a difficult question to answer. Is the fungus in your toenails? Or is the fungus on your skin (Athlete's Foot)? If the fungus is on your skin, you can try over the counter anti-fungal creams twice a day to the affected areas. If the fungus is in your toenails, it is a much more difficult problem to rid yourself of. The best treatment for toenail fungus is an oral medication called 'Lamisil.' This must be prescribed by a doctor, and you must have your liver function tested prior to use of the medication. There are over the counter medications and home remedies that you can try, but in my 20 years of experience, they do not work well. Anything you use topically to try to treat the fungus you must use consistently for a minimum of 9 months and for most people, they have to take it for 2-3 years without any resolution or improvement of the problem. If you are female, you can not wear any nail polish if you are using topical treatments, as the medication can not penetrate the nail polish. READ MORE

  • How can I get rid of a fungal infection?

    Though toenail fungus is very difficult to get rid of in some people, and some people simply can not seem to get rid of it, there are several cures. The most effective treatment I have found in my patients is oral medication called Lamisil. Many patients and doctors are afraid of prescribing or taking Lamisil because it is processed by the liver (but so are MANY medications-including all NSAIDS). As long as the liver functions are checked and within normal limits, I have NEVER had a patient have any sort of liver problem from taking Lamisil. You can not take Lamisil or other antifungals if you are taking certain other medications. Alternatively, there are several topical treatments (you need to apply these 1-2 times per day, depending on the medication, for a minimum of 9 months, and often up to 2-3 years). Lastly, there are Laser treatments (these are not covered by insurance, are costly, and usually does not work, or the problem recurs quickly after therapy). No matter what treatment you have, they all take about 9 months to fully cure the problem (even though the oral medication is only taken for 3 months, it takes 9 months to fully clear the nail of the fungus). You should bleach your shower and spray your shoes with Lysol to kill any spores in the environment that may re-infect you. READ MORE

  • How can I get rid of athlete's foot?

    Athlete's foot is a fungal infection of your skin. There are several brands of over-the-counter treatments/creams that you can try (I would stay away from the powders), and you will have to use the cream twice a day for successful treatments. If the problem does not resolve within a month of using such treatments, see a Podiatrist in your area and get a stronger, topical anti-fungal medication. Should this not resolve the problem, there are some oral medications that can be used, but they must be monitored through blood work to insure that your liver is functioning properly. Usually Athlete's Foot is easy to cure through topical therapies. READ MORE

  • How do you repair an ingrown toenail?

    Signs of infection include swelling, pain, redness, and drainage (usually a thick yellow to brown colored drainage). An ingrown toenail may hurt and cause swelling and redness without an overt infection, but it is probably on its way to getting infected if it looks like that. Treating ingrowing toenails on your own is tricky, and usually patients end up worsening their problem if they try to take care of it themselves. Urgent Care, Primary Care, and Emergency Room doctors also often worsen the situation with their attempt to treat the problem. A Podiatrist is, by far, your best choice of doctors for treatment. If it is infected, you need antibiotics to treat the infection. (The bones on your feet are very close to the skin. So if the skin is infected, and the infection gets into the bone, it can end up with an amputation of the toe.) The doctor will also likely numb up your toe and remove the offending nail border with special instrumentation. If you are going to attempt to treat this on your own, start by soaking twice a day in warm water with Epsom Salts and keep the toe covered with a bandage and antibiotic ointment at all times. "Airing the area out" is the wrong course of action. Even if this treatment makes you more comfortable for a little while, but more than likely the symptoms will worsen and you will likely need to seek professional help. (Look up Onychia; Paronychia; ingrown toenail.) There is also a permanent solution to the problem called a Matricectomy, in which the offending border is removed under anesthesia, and a chemical is applied to the growth cells to inhibit regrowth of that side of the nail. This is usually not done in the face of infection, but sometimes we will put a patient on antibiotics for a week to clear the infection, and then do the permanent procedure. READ MORE

  • Is there a cure for toenail fungus?

    Though toenail fungus is very difficult to get rid of in some people, and some people simply can not seem to get rid of it, there are several cures. The most effective treatment I have found in my patients is oral medication called Lamisil. Many patients and doctors are afraid of prescribing or taking Lamisil because it is processed by the liver (but so are MANY medications-including all NSAIDS). As long as the liver functions are checked and within normal limits, I have NEVER had a patient have any sort of liver problem from taking Lamisil. You can not take Lamisil or other antifungals if you are taking certain other medications. Alternatively, there are several topical treatments (you need to apply these 1-2 times per day, depending on the medication, for a minimum of 9 months, and often up to 2-3 years). Lastly, there are Laser treatments (these are not covered by insurance, are costly, and usually does not work, or the problem recurs quickly after therapy). No matter what treatment you have, they all take about 9 months to fully cure the problem (even though the oral medication is only taken for 3 months, it takes 9 months to fully clear the nail of the fungus). You should bleach your shower and spray your shoes with Lysol to kill any spores in the environment that may re-infect you. READ MORE

  • How can I get rid of toenail fungus?

    Toenail fungus is very difficulty to get rid of. There are many 'home remedies,' including Vick's VopoRub, Tea tree oil, soaking your feet in bleach and other chemicals, but I have never seen any of these get rid of the problem. The best way to get rid of toenail fungus is with an oral medication. The medication is safe, but is processed by your liver, so your liver functions need to be evaluated prior to starting the medication. It will take 9 months to clear the infection with oral medication, but the treatment is only 1 pill per day for 3 months. There are many topical medications, as well. If you use topical medications, be prepared to spend 9 months to 3-4 years of treatment once or twice a day, depending on the medication. Many times, the topical therapy does not work. Finally, there are laser treatments. They are costly, not covered by insurance, and there is no actual study showing that this treatment is effective at curing the fungus. Even if the fungus clears for a while using the laser, 90% of the time, there is a recurrence of the problem within 1 year of treatment. READ MORE

  • Why are my feet dry and cracked?

    This is a problem that can arise secondary to Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating), fungal infections, and abnormal biomechanics. You can try over-the-counter Amlactin cream, and if the problem is bad, you can apply the cream, then wrap your feet in saran wrap for the night. In the morning, you can use a callus file or pumice stone to lightly go over the callused areas, and they should resolve in a few weeks. If it is a fungal infection, this remedy will not help, and you should seek medical attention. READ MORE

  • Would I need surgery for my heel spur?

    In my practice, it is very rare for me to have to do surgery for heel spurs. And, the spur is actually not the problem-the problem is actually with a ligament, the Plantar Fascia, and the problem is really called Plantar Fasciitis. I am usually (99%) able to relieve a patient's Plantar Fasciitis with cortisone injections, foot strappings, orthotics, and a program of stretching and icing. There are also Shock Wave and Miracle Wave therapy and other physical therapy modalities that can be used to treat this problem. Read up on Plantar Fasciitis. If you are not getting better, seek a second opinion. READ MORE

  • Is there any way to prevent plantar warts?

    A plantar wart is actually caused by a Virus (HPV), so it is an infection. There are 7 layers to your Dermis, and the Virus resides in the 7th (deepest) layer. So warts are difficult to get rid of because you have to eradicate the Virus, and they generally have a 60-70% recurrence rate. In my practice, there are many things that I can do to treat them, but they often require multiple treatments. As far as prevention goes, try not to walk barefoot in high traffic areas where a lot of people might have spread the virus onto the floor or area you're walking on (such as public pools, bathrooms, and gyms). Keep your feet clean. DO NOT pick at your warts-you can transfer them to your hands or to other parts of your body. Also, many people confuse some corns and calluses as warts. As far as over the counter treatments, you can try acid plasters and Duofilm (also an acid), but be careful not to create an open wound on your skin by using too much acid-this could lead to infection. READ MORE

  • I keep getting bunions--what should I do to prevent them?

    Bunions are caused by a combination of tight or pointed toed shoe gear, the biomechanics of your foot and ankle, and genetics, to some degree. But if you needed 2 bunion surgeries on the same foot in the same year, your surgeon either did a poor job, did not fully grasp the biomechanics of your particular foot and did not do the correct procedure, or you may have done something during the post-operative course to allow recurrence of the bunion. I say this with the greatest of sensitivity, but a 3-year trained Podiatrist that is board certified in surgery is the best possible type of doctor that you can have evaluate and surgically treat the problems of your foot and ankle. Orthopedic surgeons who specialize in foot and ankle surgery only require a 6 month to 1 year fellowship to do the same thing a 3-year residency trained Podiatrist learn over the course of 7 years. So the proper choice of surgeons is invaluable. READ MORE

  • Is the pain in my heel a heel spur?

    It could be a heel spur, but in actuality, a "heel spur" is actually a problem called Plantar Fasciitis. It could be a stress fracture of your calcaneus. It could be tendonitis. It's best if you see a specialist for the problem. READ MORE

  • What should I avoid doing after my ingrown toenail removal?

    Your doctor probably won't give you anything after the procedure; he will probably tell you what you need to purchase. All of us, as physicians, practice differently, and I can only tell you the protocol we follow in my office after such a procedure. If it is a simple removal of an ingrown toenail, we have our patients soak 15-20 minutes in warm water with either Epsom salts or Dial antibacterial hand soap. Then the patient has to keep the toe covered with antibiotic ointment and a band aid until the area is healed. If there is an infection when we remove the offending nail border, we also prescribe an antibiotic orally with the above post-operative care. If there is a permanent removal (a Matricectomy), then the protocol is similar for the after-care, but we also prescribe a bottle of anti-inflammatory drops to apply to the surgical site prior to dressing the area with a band aid and antibiotic ointment. So, this is the protocol in my practice; but your physician may do things differently READ MORE

  • Do bunion correctors work?

    Now, actually, it depends on what you actually mean by 'bunion.' Many of my patients call corns or calluses bunions, and from your sentence, 'my mom FOUND a bunion on her foot, that is what it sounds like you mean.' But an actual bunion is a boney structural deformity and the only way to fix it or correct it is with surgery. The 'bunion correctors' do not work-they are a gimmick. If you are talking about corns and calluses, the over-the-counter treatments often have acid which can eat a hole in your skin and lead to infections and even amputations. It seems it would be in your mother's best-interest to go see a Podiatrist READ MORE

  • Is Vick's really a treatment for athlete's foot?

    Vick's is technically not an anti-fungal, and I would not recommend using it for athlete's foot. I have often heard of people trying to use Vick's for toenail fungus, and there are some anecdotes of it helping, but no actual evidence. A prescription or over the counter anti-fungal twice a day is what I would really recommend. Tea Tree oil does have some actual anti-fungal properties. You could try Tea Tree Oil, but I believe an actual medication is far superior of a treatment READ MORE

  • Are arch supports the only way to treat neuroma?

    An arch support can help to alleviate neuroma pain and can help to prevent recurrence of a Neuroma AS LONG AS IT IS EQUIPPED WITH A WELL-POSITIONED METATARSAL PAD, which alleviates pressure from the metatarsal head region. However, there are many other ways to treat neuroma pain. In my practice, I start with the least destructive treatment, which would be a cortisone injection. From there, you have several, more invasive and destructive procedures. These include sclerosing injections to destroy the nerve, excision of the neuroma, or simple release of the ligament above the neuroma around the metatarsal head region, but this last surgical decompression often does not work. READ MORE

  • What happens if I leave my ingrown toenail untreated?

    If you do not treat the problem, you will have increased swelling, redness, pain and even a possible infection and abscess around the nail fold. The pain and discomfort will increase. Antibiotics will only alleviate the infection, but once finished with the antibiotics, the problem will recur without appropriate treatment to remove the aggravating nail border. READ MORE

  • How can I prevent heel pain?

    The question, "What is the best way to prevent heel pain?" is a fairly broad question. In the case you are discussing, wearing high heels is obviously the problem. You should try changing the type of shoes you are wearing. READ MORE

  • Is a bunion a bone growth?

    A bunion is a boney abnormality. But it is not a bone growth. It is a medially subluxation of the 1st metatarsal and a lateral subluxation of the big toe at the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint. It can only be truly fixed surgically, as the bones need to be relocated to a more functional position. The bunion feels 'hard' because it is bone. Sometimes, when bunion has been present for a long time, a little bit of extra bone may develop at the medial side of the joint, but that is not actually the 'bunion' READ MORE

  • What can I do to prevent bunions?

    Bunions are technically caused by a combination of poor shoe gear, genetics, and mechanical dysfunction of the foot (particularly pronation and flat foot). When I do bunion surgery, I will, as often as possible, include an implant to prevent pronation of the Subtalar Joint, which helps to prevent recurrence of the bunion in the future. If your surgeon did not do this, the best ways to prevent recurrence of, or formation of a new bunion is to wear mostly flat shoes-stay away from high heels and shoes that taper in the toe box (you need a rounded or squared off toe box). Also, using appropriate (NOT Dr Scholl or The Good Feet Store) orthotics in your shoes can significantly help to prevent the formation of bunions by maintaining proper mechanical control of your foot and ankle. READ MORE

  • How are corns under a toenail removed?

    Toenails are made of thick Keratin. Corns are dermal conditions. So, the best thing to do in this case would be to have a podiatrist evaluate the condition to see what the problem really is, as I don't believe you can have a corn beneath a toenail. READ MORE

  • I have pain in my ankle and it may need surgery. Will my diabetes make it difficult to heal my ankle?

    Diabetes alone is not a reason to avoid surgery. HOWEVER, there are more potential complications healing in a patient that is diabetic. The biggest concerns about healing in a diabetic are 1) Circulation must be adequate for good healing (this can be tested) 2) A diabetic automatically has a decreased immune response and is more susceptible to infection (your physician must be one familiar with treating and doing surgery on diabetic patients, and must do diligent work up prior to, and good follow up after surgery). Your blood glucose must be under very good control (Hemoglobin A1c <7.0). READ MORE

  • What is the best way to clean your feet when you have diabetes?

    You should use gentle soap and water to clean your feet daily. You should NOT soak your feet for long periods of time in Epsom salts, as this actually dries out your skin. You should check between your toes daily to insure that there is not maceration or athletes foot/wounds between your toes. You should use a hydrating lotion on your feet daily before bed and/or after you shower. Keeping the skin healthy is very important for preventing ulcers and infections, which, in turn, will help to prevent amputations. READ MORE

  • What is the cause of my foot pain?

    If you have had pain for one year or more, and the pain is in multiple places, you will need to be assessed by a physician. Burning pain is often neurologic in nature, but it is unclear what is wrong with you from your description, and the problem may be more complex than your realize. READ MORE

  • What can I do for my dry and cracked heels?

    The reason for this is usually a condition called Hyperhidrosis, which is excessive sweating of the palms, plantar foot, or other parts of the body. This problem actually wicks moisture out of your tissues and dries them out. There is often a component of callus formation where the fissures and cracks form-most commonly around the heels and forefoot in the weight bearing areas. There are some good prescription and non-prescription creams that have enzymes which help to break down the callused tissue and help to soften the skin and get rid of the calluses and fissures. Over the counter, the best is called Amlactin. You can have similar cream or lotion prescribed by your Podiatrist called Lac Hydrin. These creams contain Lactic Acid, which is safe for your skin and effective against the fissures and calluses. Another type of prescription cream is a Urea cream. They work similarly. When the fissures are very bad, I have my patients apply the cream at night and wrap their feet in Saran Wrap to hold the medication close to the skin and so it does not soak into the sheets during the night. Then, in the morning, just gently go over the affected areas with a Pumice stone or a Callus File. Once the skin is normal again, you no longer have to use the Saran Wrap and can just apply the lotion nightly to the feet. READ MORE

  • I have an ingrown toenail. How would it be removed?

    There are 2 types of removals: A nail Avulsion, where the nail is removed from the tip of the toe back to the 'root.' This is done under local anesthesia. The second type is called a Matricectomy, and the same procedure as above is performed, but then a chemical is applied to the most proximal part of the nail fold where the nail grows from to burn the growth cells of the offending border, and the goal of this procedure is to be a 'permanent' removal. So the edge bothering you should not grow back. You can look up these procedures on line, or even watch a video on YouTube of the procedures. READ MORE

  • Should I stay away from pedicures?

    It is true. Pedicure and manicure places tend to be dirty. I see many patients every year that get ingrowing toenails, fungal infections, bacterial infections and other issues from going to a Pedicure facility. The instruments, themselves, are never truly sterile (like doctor's instruments are), as bead and chemical sterilizers only clear about 80-85% of fungus and bacteria. To truly sterilize instruments, they must be put in a medical grade autoclave, as doctors and hospitals use. The tubs, too, that you soak in tend to be full of bacteria. A study was done where the examiners swabbed the instruments and the basins that people soak in, and they went to 10 different facilities and grew all sorts of microbes. If you must go, bring your own instruments and do not soak in the basins. But, you may medically qualify for regular toenail and callus trimming by a Podiatrist. You will have to see one in your town to find out if you meet the medical criteria for such treatment READ MORE

  • How are ingrown toe nails removed?

    There is a permanent procedure called a Matricectomy to permanently remove the offending ingrown toenails that bother you. You can google the procedure on line and actually watch one on video/YouTube. READ MORE

  • Should I see a podiatrist for my feet If I have diabetes?

    The absolute answer is "YES! WITHOUT QUESTION!" Diabetics are at a much higher risk for amputation, particularly if you have impairment of your circulation or your nerves (Neuropathy). Uncomplicated Diabetics are seen once a year. Patients with Peripheral Vascular Disease (PVD) or Neuropathy are at more risk, and qualify to be seen every 8-10 weeks for nail care and callus care, and are usually allowed 1 pair of Diabetic shoes with custom insoles every year. Read about Diabetics and lower extremity amputations. READ MORE

  • How are bunions removed?

    A bunion is a structural problem. It is a movement of the 1st metatarsal away from the 2nd metatarsal, which increases the angle between the metatarsal, changes the weight bearing surface of your foot, changing the mechanics and function of your foot. This is more complicated than it may seem, but the only way to remove a bunion is through surgery, and, if done properly, will take about 6 weeks for your to recover to the point of getting into shoes again, but you will have swelling for several months after surgery (but it gets less and less swollen the further away from the surgery date you get). This swelling is normal, but concerns and bothers patients, at times. Look up Hallux Abducto Valgus and its treatments on line. READ MORE

  • What should I do to prevent my feet from hurting in the snow?

    Well, the main reason that your feet might hurt in the snow is from pre-frostbite/decreased circulation to the toes and extremities. Your body goes into a self-preservation mode as it gets cold, and saves blood and oxygen for the internal organs, and decreases the circulation to the extremities, hands and feet. If you must do this, you should wear 2 layers of heavy socks, and you should switch out your socks at least twice a day to remove the moisture that may make your feet even more cold when the socks become saturated with sweat. But if the problem is severe, you should visit a cardiologist/vascular surgeon to have your circulation examined. READ MORE

  • I have a small growth around my ankle. Could it be serious?

    It is impossible to diagnose something like this without seeing it. You should get it checked out by a Podiatrist ASAP. It is very uncommon to have a malignancy in the foot or ankle, but it can happen. Better to be safe than sorry READ MORE

  • Can bunions indicate an underlying foot problem?

    The cause of bunions is a combination of genetics, shoe gear, and biomechanics. There is usually, in my experience, a mechanical issue with the function of a patient's foot that causes bunions. Just because your shoes are 'comfortable,' does not mean they are good for your feet or giving your feet the mechanical and structural support they need. READ MORE

  • Why do I find it hard to flex my toes?

    A number of things could cause this type of problem; anything from excessive swelling in the foot, leg and ankle, to neurologic issues to tendonitis. You need to have this examined more thoroughly to find out what is wrong READ MORE

  • Can heel pain be treated surgically?

    In my practice, it is rare to perform surgery for the most common type of heel pain, Plantar Fasciitis. 99% of the time I am able to resolve the problem conservatively if this is the diagnosis. However, there are other diagnoses that could cause heel pain. Your Diabetes may or may not come into play. But being Diabetic, you should never hesitate to see your Podiatrist about the pain, as there could be something more serious happening. The worst thing would be for you to end up having an amputation because you ignored the problem. Make an appointment with your Podiatrist immediately READ MORE

  • Why does my ankle sprain easily?

    Frequent ankle sprains may be a result of stretching or even rupture of the lateral ankle ligaments. This can be diagnosed through MRI imaging and through a clinical exam by your Podiatrist. The more often you sprain the ankle, the less likely the ligaments are to return to their natural state of tension and support, and the more likely that they will eventually rupture. There are very good surgical procedures to help correct this problem, and the recovery is not too long. My patients who get lateral ankle stabilization procedures are usually very happy with the results and return to full activity without having more sprains and with a feeling of increased security and stability with activity. READ MORE

  • My foot looks like it has a wart on the bottom of it. How can I get rid of it?

    Most over the counter treatments are not effective in treating warts, and I have seen several patients get infections from using the over the counter treatments inappropriately or too frequently. I recommend going to see your local Podiatrist. There are several ways to treat the wart, such as freezing, acids, other topical treatments, Bleomycin injections, surgical treatment with excision and/or lasers or cautery. However, there are other foot pathologies that look like warts, and may not be. Warts are caused by the Human Papilloma Virus, and there are other skin lesions that can be acquired that are not from an infectious process. It's best to see a professional for treatment. READ MORE

  • How can I prevent foot issues?

    This is a very vague question. It really depends on what your risks are, what your comorbidities are, and what your foot dysfunction might be. Often times, you can help your foot function with proper, custom made orthotics (the majority of over the counter orthotics are not adequate to help with your foot function/dysfunction) READ MORE

  • I frequently get blisters on my feet when I wear shoes. Why does this keep happening?

    Blisters can happen for a number of reasons. If you find that it happens with certain shoes, the shoes are not fitting you properly-they are probably sliding on your feet causing friction that is creating the blisters. Your foot function should be examined by a professional-it is possible that orthotics will rectify the abnormal function that might be causing the blistering. Simply changing shoes may rectify the problem. READ MORE

  • What is the treatment for hammer toe?

    Pain in the ball of the feet may or may not be from hammer toes. There is no way to straighten a hammer toe without surgical intervention. But there are several causes of pain at the ball of the feet and many can be treated either with injections or with arch supports, or both. It would be best fro your mother so that she can be more thoroughly evaluated by a specialist, and treatment will be given, if necessary. READ MORE

  • I have a bone growth under my heel and it hurts. What should I do?

    You may have a heel spur, or you may not and may still have significant pain from a problem with a ligament on the bottom of your foot. The problem is called Plantar Fasciitis. The most common cause of heel pain that I see in my practice is caused by a pathology called "Plantar Fasciitis." People usually come in complaining of pain at the inside of their heel or along the bottom of the arch that came on suddenly. Symptoms usually consist of pain that starts with the first step out of bed in the morning, after getting up out of a seated position, and pain that may extend around the back of the heel and up the back of the leg as the disease progresses. What is Plantar Fasciitis? The plantar fascia is a ligament that runs from the bottom of the heel to the ball of the foot. A ligament is a thick, fibrous structure that attaches one bone to another bone, and is present for structural support. The plantar fascia is one of the major supports for holding up the medial arch of the foot. The reason that the plantar fascia gets irritated is usually from a combination of causes. It often occurs if a patient has recently had a gain in weight, or sometimes when there has been a recent change in activity level. Often, a patient will have recently started a new exercise regimen, which causes increased stress on the ligament and along the arch. Also, peoples’ arches often begin to fall, or flatten as they get older, and this may also cause stress to the plantar fascia. This causes an inflammatory process along the course of the ligament, or at its insertion on the heel, which causes pain. The reason the ligament hurts after periods of rest is simple. When a patient is not standing, there is no stress along the arch or on the ligament. The ligament then has a chance to begin healing. The moment the foot hits the ground, all of the healing that may have been done, gets undone, and the inflammatory response begins all over again. This becomes a repetitive cycle, and the pain may become worse and worse as the pathology progresses. So, how do we treat Plantar Fasciitis? There is a standard regimen that I use for my patients experiencing this problem. The fastest way to get rid of the inflammatory response is to give the patient a cortisone injection. Though unpleasant, most patients are happy to try to get rid of the pain swiftly. The foot is then strapped to support the arch so the ligament does not tighten up with weight bearing and activity. A strict course of icing and stretching is instated for the patient. Further injections may be given, but a patient should generally never have more than 3 injections in the same area more than 3 times in a 12 month period. Doing so may weaken the soft tissues. Orthotics are also very effective in preventing the problem from recurring, and help the patient with over-all function and balance. In fact, orthotics not only help to support the medial arch, but they help to balance out the knees, hips and low back, and help to prevent muscle fatigue. Surgery is rarely indicated for Plantar Fasciitis. In fact, the current literature states that unless a patient has had this problem for a minimum of 9 months, and has been compliant with all of his physical therapy and conservative therapy, surgery should not be performed. Surgical correction of this problem involves cutting the ligament, and this will eventually lead to an over-all weakening of the medial arch, and weaken the structure of the foot, in general. I have a great deal of success treating Plantar Fasciitis with my patients, and usually am able to make a patient pain free within 2 weeks to 2 months, in extreme cases. The longer the pain is present, the harder it is to get rid of. So, if you are experiencing heel pain, be sure to see your local foot and ankle specialist as soon as possible for the best results! Lee Wittenberg, DPM READ MORE

  • I get cramps in my foot very frequently. What could be wrong?

    Cramping in the foot might be caused by mechanical issues related to the joints and tendons in your foot. This might arise from muscle fatigue or stress, possibly even related to having a flat foot, or other deformities or functional issues that are occurring during ambulation and activities. Your muscles may be working harder to compensate for some of these issues. Your best resolution to the problem would be to visit your local Podiatrist and have your feet examined. Good orthotics from an expert (not the kind from the pharmacy, Walmart, or rip off places like the Good Feet Store or Foot solutions) might help you resolve the problems without any type of injections or surgery. READ MORE

  • Can bath salts help in treating heel pain?

    The heat from warm water may make your feet feel better, but you are actually drying the skin out. Most pathologies do better when you ice them to decrease inflammation. Soaking in warm water or using hot compresses will increase inflammation and can increase pain READ MORE

  • I feel like the bottoms of my feet are swollen. What could be wrong?

    There could be actually swelling in your feet (venous insufficiency, a joint or nerve pain/entrapment, or trauma). Or you could have a problem with your nervous system creating a sensation of swelling that might not be there. It is difficulty to discern without examining you or knowing your medical history. You might want to visit a physician to have an examination. READ MORE

  • Do acupuncture shoes help with heel pain?

    As I tell my patients, you can try whatever you would like, and who knows? For some people weird, gimmicky things like Acupuncture Shoes my make you feel better. But, honestly, I do not think so. The key to treating heel pain, which is usually caused by Plantar Fasciitis, is supporting the medial arch (orthotics or flip flops/shoes with build in arch support), Stretching and icing, and anti-inflammatory treatments. READ MORE

  • I have a strange pain in the bottom of my feet. What could be the reason for this?

    It really depends on where your pain is. The foot and ankle are very complex with many bones, joints, tendons, ligaments, nerves and blood vessels. The location of the pain may be a little more telling. And the fact that you are overweight will most definitely put more stress on your feet and ankles and all of the structures related to them. READ MORE

  • Why could my feet be so itchy?

    It sounds like it could be a fungal infection (Athletes Foot), but there could also be other issues causing you to itch or to have bumps. My recommendation would be to try an over-the-counter topical anti-fungal cream (ask your pharmacist) and use it twice a day for 2-3 weeks. It it does not improve, see your local Podiatrist. READ MORE

  • Why do I keep getting blisters even after switching shoes?

    Blisters are mechanical in nature. You most likely have a biomechanical issue where your foot may not be functioning optimally. Sometimes Orthotics can help change and improve the mechanics of your feet and resolve theses issues. You should get checked by a local Podiatrist in your area to see if he/she can help you correct the issue READ MORE

  • My legs and feet become very heavy during my periods. What is the connection and how can I manage the pain better?

    Most women retain fluid when they are having, or just before, menstruation. This is the most likely scenario, but you should see a specialist if it persists and is a problem. READ MORE

  • Could foot odor be a sign of an infection?

    Foot odor can be a bacterial infection, a fungal infection, or could be from the proliferation of bacteria and fungus inside your shoes. It usually comes hand-in-hand with hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating). You can try over the counter high strength antiperspirant like 'Certain Dry,' and you can spray your shoes with Lysol once a week to kill microorganisms living in your shoes. You can also change your socks twice a day. But if it continues, see a specialist READ MORE

  • I have white spots on the bottom of my feet. What could these be?

    It could be Athlete's Foot/a fungal infection, or it could be something else, but there is no real way to tell without having it evaluated READ MORE

  • How can I control the bad smell from my feet?

    There is a prescription strength antiperspirant called "Certain Dry" that I recommend to my patients with Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating) that can be applied to the bottom of the feet and palms of the hands 2x per day. It is over the counter-ask the pharmacist where to find it. Also, I recommend spraying your shoes out with Lysol once a week and letting them dry for at least 24 hours prior to using them again. This will kill bacteria/fungus/mold in the shoes. Also, I recommend changing your socks twice a day. READ MORE

  • Why do I have flat feet?

    Almost everyone's arch flattens out to a certain degree when they stand up due to ground reactive forces on the feet. There are different types of flatfoot - flexible and rigid - and different things can cause the foot to be flat, whether it is a congenital abnormality, or weakening of ligaments and tendons over time, to the overall structure of your feet. You should see a Podiatrist and, if your deformity is a flexible one, you should invest in a good pair of orthotics for your shoes (arch supports) with the appropriate accommodations for your particular issues, and you should wear the devices all of the time and may also have to consider changing the type of shoes you wear. READ MORE

  • Why do I keep getting an ingrown toenail?

    There are several reasons why people get recurrent ingrown toenails. These range from the type and tightness of shoe worn to the genetic shape of the toenail and other reasons, as well. And, YES, there is a permanent removal of ingrown toenails called a Matricectomy that can be performed in the office of a Podiatrist. The toe is numbed, the offending border or borders are removed, and a chemical is placed in the corner of the nail bed to burn the growth cells. You will have to take care of it afterwards for a couple of weeks, but there is minimal pain associated with the procedure after it is performed. READ MORE

  • Why do my feet hurt every time I run?

    This is particularly difficult to answer without an exam, but there are many reasons that your feet may hurt when you run. It could be your weight. It could also be pronation and Posterior Tibial Tendon Dysfunction (which are elements and symptoms of having a flat foot). You should see a Podiatrist to see exactly what kind of dysfunction you might have with your feet and how best to correct these issues READ MORE

  • What is the best way of recovering from a sprain?

    RICE therapy is the best for an acute injury. Rest, Ice, Elevation, Compression. Sprains can take longer to heal than an actual fracture with some people having pain >6 months after injury. If the pain persists >2 months, your brother should seek medical attention. READ MORE

  • I have had repeated sprains in my ankle. Will it keep happening? What can I do?

    "Sprain" means the ligaments have stretched. And that weakens the integrity of the ankle and makes you more prone to recurrent sprains. But you may also have "ruptured" or torn the ligaments, and that results in increased ankle instability. There are very well-trained podiatrists that you should attempt to see (try to see someone with either a 3-year surgical residency or someone with a 2 year residency and a fellowship in reconstructive rearfoot and ankle surgery). There is a simple surgery that can be performed called a 'Modified Brostrom' lateral ankle stabilization, and you should be recovered well enough to perform most activities by the end of 2 months after surgery. READ MORE

  • A glass piece has gone inside my foot and the area has become red. Will a podiatrist be able to help me?

    Yes, you should find a well-trained surgical Podiatrist to help you. Foreign bodies, especially things like glass (that does not show up on x-ray) can be difficult to find and remove. READ MORE

  • Why does my foot feel heavy?

    This could happen for a number of reasons. It might help to know your age, your past medical history, etc. But in the absence of that information, Neuromuscular diseases (such as Neuropathy, Muscular Dystrophy, Stroke, Lupus, and other disease processes) can cause muscle weakness and even loss of function. I would highly recommend seeing a Neurologist or Podiatrist and have a full examination READ MORE

  • Are there any side effects of wearing acupuncture slippers for a long time?

    I tell my patients all the time that the biggest thing for them is their comfort. Whether I feel something actually has clinical/therapeutic effects or not, if my patients are getting relief from a device, I am all for it. So, they will not hurt you, even in the long-term use. And if they make you feel better or give you relief, that's all the better. READ MORE

  • Is dipping feet in hot water with Epsom salt supposed to help my heel spurs?

    Soaking in Epsom Salts is good really for only 1 thing-helping to dilute and drain an infection (for example: if you had an ingrown toenail that was infected). Otherwise, the heat from the water can help with the pain, but this is really "Plantar Fasciitis," and has nothing to do with the spurs. I have answered a plantar fasciitis question in the past in very strong detail, so look for that article/response on my page. Really, for inflammatory problems, such as this, it is better to ice to decrease inflammation than to use heat/hot water. Soaking regularly in Epsom Salts and water will dry your skin out and help you little READ MORE

  • I have pus-filled white bumps around my ankle. What could this be?

    If there is pus, it could be serious. You should immediately seek attention by a dermatologist or a Podiatrist. But it could be a minor issue. If it is itchy, it could be simple athletes foot/fungal infection. READ MORE

  • Foot pain in the morning

    You most likely have plantar fasciitis. My Heel Hurts! Could I have Plantar Fasciitis??? The most common cause of heel pain that I see in my practice is caused by a pathology called ‘Plantar Fasciitis.’ People usually come in complaining of pain at the inside of their heel or along the bottom of the arch that came on suddenly. Symptoms usually consist of pain that starts with the first step out of bed in the morning, after getting up out of a seated position, and pain that may extend around the back of the heel and up the back of the leg as the disease progresses. What is Plantar Fasciitis? The plantar fascia is a ligament that runs from the bottom of the heel to the ball of the foot. A ligament is a thick, fibrous structure that attaches one bone to another bone, and is present for structural support. The Plantar Fascia is one of the major supports for holding up the medial arch of the foot. The reason that the plantar fascia gets irritated is usually from a combination of causes. It often occurs if a patient has recently had a gain in weight, or sometimes when there has been a recent change in activity level. Often, a patient will have recently started a new exercise regimen, which causes increased stress on the ligament and along the arch. Also, peoples’ arches often begin to fall, or flatten as they get older, and this may also cause stress to the plantar fascia. This causes an inflammatory process along the course of the ligament, or at its insertion on the heel, which causes pain. The reason the ligament hurts after periods of rest is simple. When a patient is not standing, there is no stress along the arch or on the ligament. The ligament then has a chance to begin healing. The moment the foot hits the ground, all of the healing that may have been done, gets undone, and the inflammatory response begins all over again. This becomes a repetitive cycle, and the pain may become worse and worse as the pathology progresses. So, how do we treat Plantar Fasciitis? There is a standard regimen that I use for my patients experiencing this problem. The fastest way to get rid of the inflammatory response is to give the patient a cortisone injection. Though unpleasant, most patients are happy to try to get rid of the pain swiftly. The foot is then strapped to support the arch so the ligament does not tighten up with weight bearing and activity. A strict course of icing and stretching is instated for the patient. Further injections may be given, but a patient should generally never have more than 3 injections in the same area more than 3 times in a 12 month period. Doing so may weaken the soft tissues. Orthotics are also very effective in preventing the problem from recurring, and help the patient with over-all function and balance. In fact, orthotics not only help to support the medial arch, but they help to balance out the knees, hips and low back, and help to prevent muscle fatigue. Surgery is rarely indicated for Plantar Fasciitis. In fact, the current literature states that unless a patient has had this problem for a minimum of 9 months, and has been compliant with all of his physical therapy and conservative therapy, surgery should not be performed. Surgical correction of this problem involves cutting the ligament, and this will eventually lead to an over-all weakening of the medial arch, and weaken the structure of the foot, in general. I have a great deal of success treating Plantar Fasciitis with my patients, and usually am able to make a patient pain free within 2 weeks to 2 months, in extreme cases. The longer the pain is present, the harder it is to get rid of. So, if you are experiencing heel pain, be sure to see your local foot and ankle specialist as soon as possible for the best results! Lee Wittenberg, DPM Apache Foot & Ankle Specialists 9710 W. Tropicana Ave, Ste 115 Las Vegas, NV 89147 (702) 362-2622 READ MORE

  • Why are my ankles swollen?

    Your problem is most likely due to Venous insufficiency. Venous Insufficiency: Why are my ankles and feet swollen? People often ask me, ‘why are my ankles, legs and feet swollen?’ The most common reason for ankle and foot swelling is Venous Insufficiency. What is venous insufficiency? It is a problem of pooling of fluid or retention of fluid in the legs, feet and ankles resulting from poor venous return of blood to the heart. As we get older, or sometimes secondary to certain medical conditions, the veins are not as ‘competent’ and cannot return the blood back to our heart as efficiently as it should. The result is the over-filling of the veins in the legs and feet. When the veins get too full, the veins become distended, or stretched out. When this happens, the veins can no longer contain the excess blood and the fluid begins to leak from the veins into the surrounding tissues. This causes swelling in the legs and ankles. Veins, as opposed to arteries that carry blood away from the heart and to the surrounding tissues, have no internal muscle and they do not ‘pump’ like arteries do. The Veins rely on our skeletal muscles, the muscles that move our bodies, to squeeze them to push the blood back toward the heart for re-oxygenation. There are little valves, or cup like structures, that are meant to catch the blood as the skeletal muscles relax to try to prevent the blood from falling back down to the lower segments, and so the blood continues to travel toward the heart. But as the veins become incompetent, the valves are no longer effective, or can break down. Then the blood goes toward the heart, but just falls back down to the feet and ankles secondary to gravity. People with venous insufficiency may notice that the ankles and feet are not as swollen in the morning as they are in the afternoon. That is because when you are lying flat at night, the blood can more easily travel back to the heart, and the swelling goes down. But as you stand and walk all day, gravity takes over and pulls the blood toward the feet and ankles, and it stays there. People suffering from venous insufficiency may notice that they have spider veins around the ankles and legs. Patients may also have larger varicose veins in the thighs, legs, or ankles. Also, as the problem progresses, there may be a dark discoloration of the skin in the legs. This is secondary to Hemosiderin deposition; a break down product of the pigments in the blood cells that might die within the tissues as the fluid leaks out of the veins. This will be a brown or reddish-brown discoloration. It may never go away. There are several ways to treat Venous insufficiency. Conservatively, you can wear compression stockings to increase the efficiency of the broken veins. Secondly, you may take diuretics, or water pills, that will help the body to rid itself of excess fluid. Thirdly, you can see a vein specialist. There are procedures that may be done to improve the efficiency of the more viable veins in the legs and ankles. Swelling in the legs may also result from a more serious problem, Congestive Heart Failure (CHF). This may be a life-threatening issue, and if you are short of breath or are having difficulty breathing, or if you cannot walk very far without becoming winded and needing to rest, you should go immediately to your physician or local Emergency Room. Lee Wittenberg, DPM READ MORE

  • Is hammertoe genetic?

    Hammer toes are generally NOT genetic, but rather result from ill-fitting shoe gear, high heels, and mechanical issues related to the foot and ankle. Lee Wittenberg, DPM Apache Foot & Ankle Specialists 4840 S. Fort Apache Rd, Ste 101 Las Vegas, NV 89147 702-362-2622 2980 St. Rose Pkwy, Ste 140 Henderson, NV 89052 702-722-6633 READ MORE

  • Ingrown toenail surgery now have thick ridged nails

    The likelihood is that you may have had fungus introduced into the toenail, possibly from the surgery, or from healing after the surgery. Go to your local Podiatrist, have a nail biopsy, and see if you can take the oral medication Lamisil to eliminate the fungus in the nail. Though the treatment is only for 3 months, it takes a minimum of 9 months to clear the fungus in the nail after you start taking the medication READ MORE

Areas of expertise and specialization

Reconstructive Foot & Ankle surgeryWound care and limb salvageDiabetic Foot Care, Diabetic shoesOrthotics and biomechanics of the foot and anklePlantar fasciitisNerve pain and NeuropathyNueromasTendonitisArthritis of the foot and ankleFlat Foot and Flat Foot ReconstructionToenail FungusIngrowing ToenailsFoot and leg woundsInfections of the foot and ankleAthlete's Foot and fungal infectionsRashes, DermatitisFoot Pain, Ankle pain

Awards

  • Top Podiatrist 2017 Top Doctor 
  • Top Podiatirst 2016 Top Doctor 
  • Top Podiatrist 2018 Top doctors 

Professional Memberships

  • American Podiatric Medical Association, Inc  
  • American board of lower extremity surgery  
  • American board of foot and ankle surgeons  

Charities and Philanthropic Endeavors

  • American Diabetes Association
  • Arthritis Foundation

Dr. Lee Wittenberg, DPM's Practice location

Apache Foot & Ankle Specialists-Durango

8530 West Sunset Road 345 -
Las Vegas, NV 89113
Get Direction
New patients: 702-362-2622
www.apachefoot.com

Lee Wittenberg, DPM

9710 W Tropicana Ave Suite 115 -
Las Vegas, NV 89147
Get Direction
New patients: 702-362-2622
Fax: 702-362-0422

Lee Wittenberg

5165 S Fort Apache Rd Suite 180 -
Las Vegas, NV 89148
Get Direction

Request An Appointment With Dr. Lee Wittenberg, DPM | Podiatrist (Foot and Ankle Specialist) | Foot & Ankle Surgery

Please note that this request is not considered final until you receive email notification confirming the details.

In the event the doctor is not yet registered with FindaTopDoc, we will contact the office on your behalf in an effort to secure your appointment.

Dr. Lee Wittenberg, DPM's reviews

(0)
Write Review

Recommended Articles

  • What Is a Heel Spur?

    A heel spur refers to a small, pointed calcaneus outgrowth from the underside of the heel. The outgrowth may be seen under the heel or at the back of the heel. Both conditions may remain painless, or it can cause pain while pressure is applied to the ball of the foot.Patients may not have any...

  • Being Diagnosed with Diabetes

    The disease begins with a feeling of increased thirst, urination or unexplained weight changes. These symptoms should warrant a visit to the doctor so as to get your blood sugar tested. If the blood sugar level is more than 200 mg/dL, consider performing a sugar test. If you are unsure of the...

  • What Causes My Ankles and Feet to Swell?

    We often see the troublesome swelling in our ankles and feet, which affects our movements. Fortunately, this swelling is not very serious and you shouldn't worry about it if you are physically active. If swelling is associated with serious symptoms, it does require medical attention as it may be an...

  • All About Plantar Warts

    How do plantar warts form?Verruca Plantaris is the technical name for plantar warts. What are they? Warts are small benign (non-cancerous) growths on the skin. They typically occur when the skin is infected by a virus. In this case, plantar warts are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). This...

  • What Could Pain on Top of the Foot Mean?

    The foot comprises flexible structures of soft tissues, muscles, joints, and bones that enable us to stand, walk, and perform other daily movements. However, certain injuries and a number of health conditions can impair the balance and movement of the foot, causing pain and other problems.The pain...

  • What Are Bunions?

    A bunion is a small bony projection found at the joint of the toe on the foot. These are formed when the toe pushes against the other toes. This causes the joint to have an abnormal profile, which enlarges over a period of time. The big joint crowds the other toes of the foot resulting in pain. As...

Nearby Providers

Nearest Hospitals

SOUTHERN HILLS HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTERl

9300 WEST SUNSET RD LAS VEGAS NV 89148

Head west on West Sunset Road 2801 ft
Continue slightly right onto West Sunset Road 771 ft
Continue slightly right onto West Sunset Road 707 ft
Turn right onto Medical Center Street 1353 ft
Turn left onto West Post Road 571 ft
Turn left 198 ft
Turn right 330 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the left

ST ROSE DOMINICAN HOSPITALS - SAN MARTIN CAMPUSl

8280 W WARM SPRINGS ROAD LAS VEGAS NV 89113

Head west on West Sunset Road 495 ft
Turn left onto South Durango Drive 1.0 mi
Turn left onto West Warm Springs Road 2117 ft
Turn left 514 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the right

MOUNTAIN'S EDGE HOSPITALl

8656 WEST PATRICK LANE LAS VEGAS NV 89148

Head west on West Sunset Road 495 ft
Turn right onto South Durango Drive 2712 ft
Turn left onto West Patrick Lane 397 ft
You have arrived at your destination

SOUTHERN HILLS HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTERl

9300 WEST SUNSET RD LAS VEGAS NV 89148

Head east on West Tropicana Avenue 1.3 mi
Turn right onto South Fort Apache Road 1.8 mi
Turn left onto West Post Road 309 ft
Turn right 206 ft
Turn left 474 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the right

ST ROSE DOMINICAN HOSPITALS - SAN MARTIN CAMPUSl

8280 W WARM SPRINGS ROAD LAS VEGAS NV 89113

Head east on West Tropicana Avenue 1.5 mi
Take the ramp on the right 300 ft
Go straight 1466 ft
Merge left onto Bruce Woodbury Beltway (CR 215) 1.4 mi
Take the ramp on the right towards Sunset Road 2176 ft
Continue straight onto Jerry Tarkanian Way 985 ft
Continue straight onto Roy Horn Way 2901 ft
Turn right onto South Durango Drive 3544 ft
Turn left onto West Warm Springs Road 2117 ft
Turn left 514 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the right

MOUNTAIN'S EDGE HOSPITALl

8656 WEST PATRICK LANE LAS VEGAS NV 89148

Head east on West Tropicana Avenue 1.7 mi
Turn right onto West Tropicana Avenue 3189 ft
Turn right onto South Durango Drive 1.5 mi
Turn right onto West Patrick Lane 397 ft
You have arrived at your destination

SOUTHERN HILLS HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTERl

9300 WEST SUNSET RD LAS VEGAS NV 89148

Head north on South Fort Apache Road 3.4 mi
Turn right onto West Post Road 309 ft
Turn right 206 ft
Turn left 474 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the right

ST ROSE DOMINICAN HOSPITALS - SAN MARTIN CAMPUSl

8280 W WARM SPRINGS ROAD LAS VEGAS NV 89113

Head north on South Fort Apache Road 734 ft
Turn right onto West Pebble Road 1.1 mi
Turn left onto South Durango Drive 2.0 mi
Turn right onto West Warm Springs Road 2117 ft
Turn left 514 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the right

MOUNTAIN'S EDGE HOSPITALl

8656 WEST PATRICK LANE LAS VEGAS NV 89148

Head north on South Fort Apache Road 734 ft
Turn right onto West Pebble Road 1.1 mi
Turn left onto South Durango Drive 2.7 mi
Continue slightly right onto South Durango Drive 4607 ft
Turn left onto West Patrick Lane 397 ft
You have arrived at your destination