WIlliam F. Scott IV, DMD, Dentist

WIlliam F. Scott IV, DMD

Dentist | General Practice

161 Washington Valley Rd STE 202 Warren New Jersey, 07059

About

Dr. William Scott is a Cosmetic, Implant & Family Dentist practicing in Warren, NJ at Deluxe Dental Group.  Dr. Scott specializes in preventing, diagnosing, and treating diseases and conditions associated with the mouth and overall dental health and is trained to carry out such treatment as professional cleaning, restorative, prosthodontic, and endodontic procedures, and performing examinations, among many others.

Education and Training

Temple Dental School DMD 2014

Board Certification

American Board of Dental Public Health

Provider Details

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WIlliam F. Scott IV, DMD
WIlliam F. Scott IV, DMD's Expert Contributions
  • Straightening one tooth?

    Hello, People tend to look at orthodontics differently when it is their second time around. This time it is important to consider where the teeth are and where we want them to go; as there are always a few different ways to treat the same case. It is often the case that it is only one or a few teeth the second time around. However, even if it is one tooth, something is going to have to go on the teeth to align them. This would normally be a good situation for Invisalign or some other clear aligner system. In this case, we are looking at just the lower (mandibular) teeth, but the upper (maxillary) teeth need some consideration as well. If the upper teeth are aligned we generally want to leave them alone and only worry about the bottom. In this case, interproximal reduction (IPR) would be considered so that way only the lower front teeth would be straightened and treatment time would be 6 months or less. At age 19 most would not consider an expander as this would mostly tip the teeth and it does not seem necessary. Lastly it is important to have a full orthodontic consultation especially with a connective tissue disease like Ehlers Danlos Syndrome. This will also check for any issues that might have arisen from the first round of orthodontics. I hope this helps. My best to you, William F. Scott IV, DMD Deluxe Dental Group READ MORE

  • How many teeth can an implant hold?

    Hello, This is such a great question that is often overlooked! Ideally, one implant supports one tooth. This is what is done about 90-95% of the time. This situation has a nice high success rate (which is an important factor) over 90%. However, in the other 5-10% one implant will support two teeth. This depends on which teeth the implant is supporting. Usually, the implant will support a tooth and the second tooth will hang off the side of that tooth (cantilever system). This only works if the second tooth is smaller then the first tooth. It is not a good idea as it weakens the implant because the forces pull it to the side. Sometimes due to the shape and amount of bone available this is the only option. Finally, when a full arch is being reconstructed with implants between 10 and 14 teeth are replaced on 4-6 implants. Other than extreme cases, this is really the only time multiple teeth are supported by one implant. I hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD Deluxe Dental Group READ MORE

  • Why do gums recede around implants?

    Hello, Gums (gingiva) can recede around an implant for a few different reasons including; 1) something stuck in the gums around the implant tooth, 2) periodontal disease (periodontitis), or 3) natural order of events. First, anything stuck in the gums around the implant tooth will make the gums bleed, maybe puss, and eventually recede. This could be food continually getting impacted between the teeth or something as a little bit of extra cement from the crown being put on. The cement can be cleaned our; however, if there is a food trap (small gap between the teeth), the gap will have to be closed to stop the recession. Secondly, when an implant is put in, no one is worried about a cavity as titanium, porcelain, or zirconia do not grow cavities. However, an implant can still get periodontitis only in this case it is called peri-implantitis. The gums around the implant need to be kept clean just like any other tooth; otherwise they will recede. Finally, Titanium and titanium alloys are used for implants because they have what is known as bio compatibility. This means that they are the most compatible with a persons biological tissues (the do not cause a reaction and go undetected by the body's immune system). This is why hip implants, rods and screws used in the body are made out of titanium. However, in some cases the body will reject the implant and the gums around it will recede. Hope this helps. My best to you William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I get a dental implant years after extraction?

    Hello, Dental implants are the most natural way to replace teeth; so we try to put them in when we can which would include a tooth that was extracted year ago. However, there are several factors that come into play when a tooth has been extracted years ago that make the process more difficult. the biggest problem with placing dental implants is having enough jaw bone and having it in the right place. A carpenter can put a screw into a piece of wood because he/she knows how big the wood is and what it is shaped like. The shape of a person's jaw bone is curvy and when a tooth has been missing for a few years the jaw bone tends to atrophy (shrink). This means there is even less bone to hold the implant. Complicating factors even more there are other anatomic structures that can get in the way, such as; sinus cavity in the upper jaw (maxilla) or the nerve bundle in the lower jaw (mandible). Since the implant can not be placed in these structures, the loss of bone is more critical. Not to worry though. There have been procedures that have been developed to deal with these structures; such as a sinus lift (moving the sinus cavity upwards and adding more jaw bone for the implant). Since there has been so much development of implants and procedures around them, there are very few cases where implants can not be placed. It just may require an extra procedure. Hope this helps My Best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can an infected dental implant be saved?

    Hello, Infection of an implant is the first line of concern and the biggest issue we try to protect against. Yes, infection of an implant can mean that the implant needs to be removed (explant); however, it all depends on the size and location of the infection. Technically speaking, the very early stages of peri-implantitis is an infection. If caught early and cared for appropriately the infection can be stopped. However, as the infection gets bigger and spreads around the implant, it can affect the amount of bone there is to stabilize the implant. Think about it as a house with a crumbling foundation. When the foundation starts crumbling, it is only a little area on one side of the house; but, if it is let go, it will eventually crumble all around until it needs to be replaced. Worry not, even when an implant is removed, the infection can usually be healed, and another implant be placed in the area. Hope this helps. My Best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you fill a cavity between two front teeth?

    Hello, What a great question! Filling a cavity between two front teeth has a greater emphasis on aesthetics then in other areas of the mouth. How it is done depends on the location of the cavity. If the cavity is directly on the side of a tooth, then the access to the cavity is made from inside the mouth (by the palate) on the edge of the tooth. The decay is removed in the direction from the palate to the lips; keeping the front of the tooth intact as much as possible. If the cavity has wrapped around the front of the tooth, then the infected part on the front of the tooth will have to be removed as well. Care will be taken to only remove what is needed and then again with the filling to match the rest of the tooth as best as possible. If the teeth are crooked, over-lapping, or crowded then access to the cavity from the front may be the only option. At this point, a hole only large enough to remove the decay is made and then special attention is given to the filling material to make it match the rest of the tooth. Hope this helps. My Best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it bad to have a gap between your teeth?

    Hello, Gaps (diastemas) between teeth are not usually a good thing; however, it depends on the size of the gap and the location of the gap. The size of the gap between teeth matters as small gaps become what is known as "food traps". Teeth are shaped to allow food to flow to the sides as we eat. However, a gap will allow food to flow between teeth. A gap between two back allows food to flow between the teeth, but due to the way teeth are shaped, it does not come out so easy. Food stuck between teeth causes 2 problems. First, food that is prolonged between teeth will cause cavites. Secondly, anything that is between the teeth for a prolonged time will cause recession and mobility of the teeth. A larger gap will not allow the food to stay between the teeth. If a tooth was missing, that would be a large gap. But food particles are too small to get stuck there. The location of the gap matters because we do most of our chewing on the back tooth. If the gap is in the front, it is more of a cosmetic concern then then a food trap. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why is there a gap between my gum and the bridge?

    Hello, There could be a few different reasons for a gap between the gums (gingiva) and a bridge; but two are most common. First, when a tooth is extracted the jaw bone and gum tissue tends to atrophy (shrink). The body does not have to support a tooth anymore so there is no need to have that much bone or gums anymore. This means, since the bridge was done right away, the gums may move away from the bridge (this does not happen in all people). Secondly, the bridge could have been made that way. If the bridge is in the back some dentist make it with a small gap between the gums and the bridge to try to promote hygiene and keep the area clean. However, this type of practice is rarely done anymore and could be the work of a low quality office. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Should there be a gap between my crown and gum?

    Hello, Should there be a gap between a crown and the gums is a very interesting question that can be answered both yes and no. If the tooth is in the front, for aesthetic reasons, the crown edge is usually placed underneath the gum line. This does not mean it will stay there. For a variety of reasons (inadequate brushing or flossing, tooth thick of a crown, edge not low enough to name a few) the gums can recede a little and show the edge of the crown. If all else is alright, this is only a cosmetic problem. If the crown is out of the smile zone (in the back of the mouth); having a gap between the crown and the gum is perfectly fine. In fact, it could have been designed that way. When the edge of the crown is placed above the gum (causing a gap) it is cleaned when the tooth is brushed and flossed. When it is placed below the gum line it does not get cleaned. Cleaned crown edges promote health and prevent cavities. If it can not been seen then it is not that big of a cosmetic problem either. It is important to note that recession can happen here as well and expose the edge of the crown. As we get older, most crown edges become visible for one reason or another. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you replace a crown with a veneer?

    Hello, Interesting question, but no, a crown cannot be replaced with a veneer. When a crown gets made the tooth gets reduced (shaved) down on all sides to make room for the crown. When a veneer gets made the the tooth gets reduced on all sides except the inside (the side by the tongue). Since the inside of the tooth was reduced on the inside for the crown, there would be no covering for the inside when the veneer is made. The desire to have a veneer over a crown may not be a good thing either. A crown is usually stronger, with aesthetics that can be made better than a veneer, and does not tend to come off nearly as much. So, the only pro to having a veneer over a crown (the one surface of the tooth not reduced) is no longer valid. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do veneers ruin your teeth?

    Hello, Ruin your teeth is a relative term. Sometimes filling cavities can be part of the reason for doing veneers; however, veneers are usually done for cosmetic reasons. Most veneers involve reducing (shaving) down the front, edge, and part of the sides of the tooth to get the best looking result. This reduction can be considered by some as ruining the teeth. These people would rather have their natural teeth. However, others want their natural teeth to look better, and they do not consider veneers as ruining them only enhancing them. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why do I have ridges on my tongue?

    Hello, There are several reasons someone can have ridges on their tongue. Some of them are not too bad and some are not too good. Because of this it is highly recommended to have a professional examine the ridges (a lot of people out there do a free consultation). Location, type of ridges, and color are important to diagnosing. Sometimes people get malformations on their tongue because they have a habit of chewing on their tongue during times of stress or boredom. Oftentimes, people are unaware of it until they are asked about it. Other times, people get ridges on their tongue that are evenly spaced. These normally coincide with where their lower teeth are as the tongue sits against them. Sometimes there are lines on the top of the tongue. This is usually changes in the taste buds along the tongue's surface. However, there are more serious reasons for changes in tongue appearance which is why it is highly recommended to have a professional exam it. Hope this helps and hope the ridges are nothing bad. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a high filling cause any problems?

    Hello, Yes, a high filling can cause some problems. Usually a high filling will only bother the person when they bite down. It is important to know that teeth only touch when the person is eating or speaking ('s' sounds cause teeth to slightly touch). If there is a para-functional habit like grinding (bruxism), this will cause a steady pain from a high filling. In the short term, a high filling is more of a nuisance. It then usually turns into jaw aching because the tooth it self is taking more of the force from chewing. Finally, if it is left along for a while, the additional trauma to the tooth gets translated to the nerve and blood vessels inside the tooth and they die off (more rare cases can cause a fracture in the tooth). In this cause the tooth would need a root canal at the very least; so it is best to take care of as soon as possible. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long will my mouth be numb after a filling?

    Hello, The amount of time the numbness lasts after a filling depends on a couple of factors. First of all, there are a number of different anesthetics that can be used. These anesthetics have differences, but one of the main differences is the amount of time they are in effect. Some of them can last only 20 minutes or so; which others can last up to 8 hours. Usually the dentist doing the filling will use lidocaine (or something with the same amount of time of activation). Lidocaine will usually last 1-2 hours from the time it is given. Secondly, the person's metabolism for anesthetics plays a large role. The reason for the range for lidocaine lasting 1 to 2 hours is an average. Some people it will only last an hour while others it will last 2 hours (some people it only lasts 20 minutes!). The final aspect to consider is the amount of time it takes to do the filling. The doctor may give the anesthesia, leave, comes back 20 minutes later and do a couple of fillings for 40 minutes. That is 1 hour after the anesthesia was given. If the anesthesia only lasts one hour in that person, it will start to wear off as they are leaving the office (or they can still have the numbness for another hour). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you know if a bite is still healing after a filling?

    Hello, As soon as the anesthesia wears off the "bite" should feel the same as it did before the tooth had a filling. The bite itself does not need time to heal. However, if the pulp chamber of the tooth got irritated during the filling procedure (they usually do if the cavity was close to the pulp chamber) then the blood vessels inside the tooth need to settle down and usually an anti-inflammatory is given to help. If the bite still feels high or weird after the anesthesia wears off, it is best to call the doctor that did the filling as he/she will be the best one to assess what feels different (there should be no charge for this as it is a follow up to the procedure). At the very least the doctor will be aware that something is bothering you and can take the appropriate measures to alleviate your pain, discomfort, or concern. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a crown last a lifetime?

    Hello, Teeth with crowns are still subject to cavities, fractures, and trauma. The best crown we have is the one that we are born with. Nothing replaces enamel. However, we do have some materials that can last a long time. Any good dentist prides himself/herself on the length of time that we can get crowns to last. Some have been in peoples mouths for almost 40 years! However, even insurance companies realize that teeth with crowns can have problems and allow the crown to be replaced every so often. If they lasted a lifetime, the insurance companies would want us to put crowns on every tooth and then never pay for it again! Important things to consider after getting a crown are: 1) the tooth can still get a cavity under the crown (usually around the edge of the crown). 2) the tooth can still get periodontal disease. This means that the crown is fine, but the structure around the tooth is failing. 3) The crown material is still subject to fracture. 4) In order to prevent this, we treat it like a regular tooth; brush, floss, and be careful of what we eat. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you use hydrogen peroxide to whiten your teeth?

    Hello, Hydrogen peroxide is one of the most common whitening agents (zoom and opalescence) that dentists and tooth pastes use for whitening teeth. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) will enter the enamel of and remove some of the staining on teeth; however, it is also toxic to the soft tissues (lips, gums, and cheeks) in people's mouths. When the dentist uses a stronger concentration of hydrogen peroxide, he/she isolates the patients cheeks, lips, tongue, and gums (gingiva). Use of hydrogen peroxide at home to whiten teeth needs to have a longer contact time (time on the teeth) and this irritates the soft tissues. It is also worth noting that while there have not been any studies to prove this; but cancer is caused by damaged cells and hydrogen peroxide is a free radical which can cause damage to cells. Just some food for thought. Hope this helps My best to you, William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What if there is not enough tooth for a crown?

    Hello, Amount of tooth structure for a crown is the first thing that a dentist considers when they make the diagnosis for a crown. If there is not enough tooth, the dentist does not usually recommend a crown. He/She will recommend removing the tooth and replacing. It is important to realize that a tooth that is broken down to the gums still has the ability to be rebuilt into a crown. As long as there is no decay, a post and a build up material can be used to give the dentist enough tooth to put a crown on. Otherwise, the tooth would need to be replaced. Hope this helps. My best to you, William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What to expect after a deep filling?

    Hello, Things to look out for after a deep filling are; nothing, sensitivity, continued sensitivity, and pain. When a cavity goes close to the nerve of the tooth (pulp chamber), the blood vessels inside the tooth can get irritated and inflamed. Just like when someone bumps their arm the blood vessels will swell up and the skin will expand. The same thing happens inside a tooth; however, the tooth will not expand so the blood vessels will put pressure on the nerve. This will usually cause pain. At this point a root canal may need to be considered. Because the material that is being used for the filling does not have as much thermal protection, sensitivity or continued sensitivity can be experienced. Unfortunately, there are no substitutes for tooth enamel and the sensitivity can last up to 6 weeks. These are just the most common symptoms that can happen with a deep filling. It is also likely that someone does not experience any of these. Hope this helps William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you get a cavity under a veneer?

    Hello, Yes, it is possible to get a cavity under a veneer. Usually, the cavity starts at the edge where the veneer meets the tooth. Usually, the dentist will review and make sure the likelihood of getting a crown under the veneer will be low. Cavities can be avoided by having regular dental exams and cleanings. However, if a cavity is detected during one of these visits, they are usually small enough to repair without disturbing the veneer. If regular exams were not possible and the cavity is big, it is usually possible to change the veneer to a crown and still keep the aesthetics. Hope this helps. My best to you, William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Are veneers better than crowns?

    Hello, Asking if veneers are better than crowns is a good health care question. The answer, however, is not that straight forward. Since veneers are being discussed, it better to consider a front tooth. There are pros and cons to putting a veneer or a crown on a front tooth. The pros of putting a veneer on a front tooth are that the aesthetics of the front teeth will certainly get better and it means that less tooth structure will be removed to do so. However, the cons of doing a veneer on a front tooth means that the retention of the veneer is not as strong as a crown. A veneer may not be able to hide unaesthetic areas, either. The pros for a crown really the cons for a veneer and the cons for a crown are really the pros for a veneer. So, to answer the question of which one is better really depends on what type of person is getting the crown or veneer. If the patient is someone that wants it to be over with and not want to deal with it again, then that person should more consider the crown more. If the person values saving as much tooth structure as possible and does not mind if the veneer comes off occasionally, then they should consider a veneer. Hope this helps. My best to you, William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you clean your real teeth with veneers?

    Hello, Teeth should be cleaned the same way with or without veneers; brushing, flossing, and mouth rinse. A veneer is simply a covering that gets cemented to the underlying tooth structure. Most of the time, a small amount of enamel is removed on the front of the tooth to make room for the veneer. This way the tooth does not look more bulky than it did naturally. Once the veneer goes on the tooth, it gets cemented and sealed off. It is still important to keep the rest of the tooth and the veneer clean, and this is best accomplished by brushing and flossing. Hope this help. My best to you William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a cavity under a crown be filled?

    Hello, Filling a cavity under a crown is situational dependent. If the cavity is small and the history of cavities is low and perhaps in an elderly patient that needs to avoid longer procedures; it might be preferable to fill a cavity under a crown. However, if not all of these circumstances exist then it might be better to remove the cavity while replacing the crown. For example; cavities under crowns usually start at the edge where the crown meets the tooth. If the cavity grows and goes up under the crown then it would not be possible to do the filling without removing the crown. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What causes a root canal to get infected?

    Hello, Root canal procedures are usually around 98% successful. However, even with this high chances of success 2 out of every 100 root canals fail. A broken tooth after a root canal does not constitute a failure of a root canal. This means that most times when a root canal fails, it is due to what is termed re-infection. Re-infection of a tooth that has had a root canal comes in two different ways; new bacteria making it past the root canal sealant or old bacteria that have laid dormant re-activating. Understanding what happens during a root canal procedure is the best way to learn how a tooth with a root canal gets re-infected. First the dentists accesses the canals of the tooth, then they are cleaned and the organic matter (nerve and blood vessels) are removed from the canals as well as any bacteria that got in there. The canals are shaped a little and then filled with a material sealing off each canal. Re-infection of tooth means that bacteria have gotten into the the sealed off canals and stimulated the immune system. This means that either new bacteria from the mouth have gotten into the tooth and migrated past the sealed canals (it does happen) or the original bacteria has formed a spore (bacteria equivalent of hibernation) and then reactivated stimulating the immune system. Either way the canal system needs to be cleaned again or the tooth would need to be removed (extracted). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a tooth be filled if the nerve is exposed?

    Hello, Great question! In a theoretical sense; yes, a tooth can be filled after the nerve is exposed. This procedure is called a direct pulp cap and it is not done very often as it is not that successful and is saved for times when it is the only thing that can be done. It would depend on the the size of the exposure to the nerve; but it would involve attempting to create a bridge over the exposed area and then putting a filling on top of that. It could be structurally successful but the patient could have lingering sensitivity or chronic pain. Even if the patient does not have any discomfort immediately after the procedure, the tooth still needs to be monitored at each cleaning and perhaps additional visits, then the tooth may flare up 6 months later. With the success of root canals, and the cultural drive of not wanting to re-visit the same tooth problem continuously most people choice the root canal. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What hurts more tooth extraction or root canal?

    Hello, Not many people think to ask which hurts more a root canal or an extraction. It is a smart question. There are a couple things to consider to figure out whether a root canal or an extraction hurts more; however, the extraction edges out a root canal (extraction is more painful). Neither of which should be painful during the procedure. First of all it is important to consider that basically the same thing is happening in both root canal and extraction procedures. The nerve is sending pain signals back to the brain causing the tooth to hurt. In both cases (extraction and root canal) the nerve of the tooth is being removed. No nerve, no pain signals to send to the brain. In the root canal the nerve is being removed from the inside of the tooth. In the case of the extraction the whole tooth is being removed which means the nerve comes with it. However, in the case of the extraction, since the whole tooth is being removed, it is going to severe other nerves in the tooth socket and jaw bone itself. There is more pressure on the jaw bone as it has to be flexible to let the tooth be removed. Secondly, one of the most miss-understood ideas about root canals is, they either hurt afterward (like an extraction would) or they feel relieved afterward (unlike an extraction). This means that sometimes the nerve inside the tooth dies on its own and it is causing pain, but when the dentist removed the nerve, there is nothing to cause pain and the patient feels much better. These people often swear that their dentist can do a great root canal cause they had no pain afterward. Usually, these cases are ones that people have waited long past when the root canal should have been started, and the pain is unbearable. In summary, because an extraction severs more nerves and a root canal may not hurt at all afterward, the root canal should be considered less painful. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it normal for gums to hurt after a filling?

    Hello, It is very possible for gums to hurt after a filling, but it is not the norm. Fillings come in all different shapes and sizes. Sometimes they are large and get close to the nerve (pulp chamber) of the tooth and sometimes they run along the side of the tooth. If the cavity happens to be close to the gums, there is a couple instruments that the dentist has to put between the teeth to help isolate the gums (gingiva) from the tooth. Occasionally, any of the instruments can irritate the gums and cause them to bleed. If there is a lot of irritation then the gums will hurt after the anesthesia wears off. The discomfort will usually be felt around the tooth and not inside of it. It is best to have the dentist who did the filling evaluate the area to diagnose what is causing the discomfort (there should not be a charge as it is part of the filling procedure). Hope this helps. My best to you, William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does alcohol help tooth pain?

    Hello, Drinking alcohol is a central nervous system (CNS) depressant; which means it slows down nerve impulses in the the brain, brain stem and spinal cord. However, nerve impulses do get through, so the pain signals will still be received by the brain. This myth gets is merit from the fact the alcohol does cause retro-grade amnesia (the ability of someone got drunk and does not remember what happened even before they started drinking). So, psychologically speaking, it is possible to forget that someone had pain during the time they were drinking. However, some people react more intensely to stuff when they drink alcohol so it is very possible that they will feel the pain worse then it actually is. In summary, drinking alcohol will not ease the tooth pain. Hope this helps. My best to you William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if a blood clot forms after tooth extraction?

    Hello, Clotting blood is a very complicated biological pathway. We need it to be this way. We need blood to clot when we cut ourselves, but we do not want it to clot while it is in our arteries and veins. After an extraction, a clot is formed in the extraction socket. This is what helps protect the socket while it heals. In fact, the loss of this clot is what we refer to as dry socket (alveolar osteitis), a very painful condition. We want this clot to form and stay put. A clot inside an artery or vein is not a good thing. If this type of clot forms then it is an emergency and immediate medical help is needed as it can cause a stroke, heart attack, or infarction somewhere else. However, unless someone is suffering from a specific illness, there is no reason for a clot to form inside that person's artery or vein. Hope this helps. My best to you, William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a dentist fix half a tooth?

    Hello, It depends on which half of the tooth is missing and if the remaining half is intact or has decay in it. As long as a tooth is free of decay and the root is in tact, then a lot of times the dentist can build a tooth up from the gums. Things that mean the dentist can not fix half a tooth is if the remaining half has too much decay or if the decay goes between the roots of the tooth or if the decay goes too deep down the root of the tooth. It is always worth a free consultation to find out what can be done with half a tooth. Hope this helps. My best to you, William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How does a dentist remove a broken tooth?

    Hello, Removing a broken tooth is a good question. The age old expression of ".. its like pulling teeth" is fun to say but fundamentally wrong. Dentists do not pull teeth out (actually that is how they break). Dentist manipulate teeth out, and a lot of times they do that by pushing. Believe it or not, in a lot of cases, a broken tooth is easier to remove than an intact tooth (because there is more pushing than pulling). Whether or not the tooth is broken, the dentist is going to start by moving the gums (gingiva) off of the tooth, and then using instruments expand the slightly expand the socket that the tooth sits in. Once this expansion is done the dentist will push the tooth to the side in all different directions. At this point the tooth will want to rise up out of the socket (think about what would happen if you slide your finger down the side of a martini glass and until you hit the bottom. The olive resting in the bottom will pop up). This is continued until the tooth comes all the way out, or the tooth is able to be grabbed with something. Hope this helps. My best to you William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do cavities heal without fillings?

    Hello, Only certain cavities can heal without fillings. The cavity has to be extremely small, microscopic, in fact. It sounds weird to say; but a cavity can only be healed as long as it is not cavitated. It is helpful to think of the enamel of a tooth like scaffolding. Prior to becoming an actual cavity, the tooth gets demineralized in that area. The enamel looses its minerals but the scaffolding is still there. This is the beginning part of the cavity and as long as the scaffolding is still there then minerals can be added back to it. At this point, dentists advise to increase brushing and flossing and and a fluoride mouth wash into the daily routine. Fluoride will get added to the enamel scaffold and the cavity process will reverse. This is a long process that requires frequent check ups at the dental office. However, once the scaffolding is gone, there is nothing there for the minerals to cling onto. Hope this helps. My best to you William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a zirconia crown break?

    Hello, This is a very good question! Zirconia crowns are some of the strongest crowns we have; however, they do break on occasion. The first thing to ascertain is whether the crown is going to be full zirconia or if it is going to be zirconia with a more aesthetic porcelain layered on top of it. The zirconia with porcelain layered on it is much more prone to fracture at the junction of the layering. A full strength zirconia crown with no layering is very strong and done every single day. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What causes dental bridges to fall out?

    Hello, Dental bridges can fall out for a variety of reasons; however, there are usually only a couple reasons that cause bridges to fall out the majority of the time. The first thing to consider is the cement. How old is the dental bridge? A bridge made over 10 years ago was likely cemented with a different cement than what is used to day. These cements typically only last about 10 years. If this is the case, the dental bridge can be re-cemented. Secondly, a lot of times posts are used to build up the teeth that hold dental bridges in. The cement that holds these posts in do not last as long as the cement that holds the dental bridge in. A lot of the time these posts can be re-cemented; however, sometimes they can not because of the different angles of the posts. If this is the case, new posts would usually be put in and a new bridge would be made or reverse core build ups would be done. Finally, another thing to consider is cavities. Cavities can form around the base of the bridge and if they get bad enough the bridge will fall out. At this point, it is best to consult with a dentist about what can be done. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can teeth be saved with periodontal disease?

    Hello, Periodontal disease comes in a variety of different forms and for different reasons which makes diagnosis important. Chronic periodontitis (periodontal disease) is the most common form and it usually starts in the 30s and 40s. This form of periodontal disease is usually very slow and treatable. It is not normally reversible; however, it can be stopped where it is and maintained for the rest of someone's life. Once it is stopped there is also the possibility of gingival (gum) grafts to make the area more aesthetic. The ability to treat chronic periodontal disease depends on which point the disease was first identified, diagnosed and treated. If the teeth had some mild recession before treatment started then with good treatment they are most often saved with no hesitation. If the teeth were loose before the diagnosis and treatment was made then those teeth may or may not be savable. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long should you wait to eat after getting a tooth pulled?

    Hello, Drinking after getting a tooth pulled (extracted) can be done almost immediately after; however, there are some inconveniences. First of all, during the tooth extracting procedure, the patient will get some local anesthesia and have some numbness feeling. This means that drinking water may be difficult because there will not be full sensation of the lips and cheeks. Secondly, the patient will normally leave the office biting down on the gauze. This is to help the clot form in the extraction site and is only needed for the first 30 minutes after the extraction. If needed, water can be drunk but it is not easy and preferred to wait. However, when it comes to eating it is best to wait until after the gauze comes out. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do dental bridges look natural?

    Hello, Good for you for asking an in-depth question. Dental bridges can look very natural; however, this is dependent on a few factors. First of all, the dentist making the bridge is important as the dental bridge will only look as natural as he/she designs it to be and the lab they uses makes it with detail. Some people have more of an eye for aesthetics then others. Secondly, where it goes in the mouth and how long the tooth that the dental bridge is replacing has been missing. If the tooth has been missing for quite some time then the gums and jaw bone probably has receded some. This means the area that the bridge is covering is a little bigger then normal and the false tooth in the bridge may look a little longer. Also the teeth around the bridge tend to shift when the tooth has been missing for a long time. This means that the tooth can look skinnier then it normally would be. If the bridge is made shortly after the tooth is extracted then these factors are usually not a problem. Interestingly enough, if these problems do exist, then a lot of times a dental bridge will look more natural then an implant. Finally, it is important to consider the teeth around the dental bridge. If they are stained, discolored, or having fillings or cavities in them; this will make a beautifully made dental bridge look out of place. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do you need healthy gums for Invisalign?

    Hello, Asking about healthy gums (gingiva) for invisalign is a very good question; however, the answer is not very straight forward. It would be best to have healthy gums before invisalign is started; but, that may not be possible in all cases. Teeth that are not aligned properly cause a few problems. Anyone with crooked teeth knows that it is very difficult to clean in and around these teeth. Even the dentist or hygienist has a hard time cleaning these teeth. This means that plaque, bacterial and hardened plaque known as calculus gets built up on these teeth which cause inflammation of the gums. These gums are not healthy; but the chances of them becoming healthy before the start of invisalign is very slim. Remember one of the reason we straighten teeth is to get healthier gums. Secondly, teeth that are crooked tend to cause gum problems regardless if they are clean or not. As teeth lean over or rotate they pinch the gums which cause them to recede or become inflammed. This problem will not settle down until the teeth are straightened with either braces or invisalign. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if a baby tooth doesn't fall out?

    Hello, Baby teeth do not usually start falling out (exfoliating) until near age 6 (it could even be a little later). At this point children usually have at least a couple exams with a dentist, and the ones that are loose and ready to fall out will be noted. If at this point a child does not start getting loose baby teeth (they have to get loose before they fall out) then the doctor can examine and figure out why they are not getting loose. One of the reason for them not getting loose is simply because the adult tooth has not erupted (grown in enough) or the adult tooth is not coming in directly under the baby tooth. If the adult tooth has not come in enough, then most of the time just waiting is the correct solution. If the adult tooth is not under the baby tooth (lower front teeth can sometimes come in behind the baby teeth) then sometimes the baby teeth need to be extracted (this is rare though). Finally, baby teeth may not get loose if there is no tooth behind it. If the adult tooth is missing, then the baby tooth may stay in that place. There are plenty of adults walking around each day with a baby tooth still in place. All these possibilities are good reasons why continual check-ups by a dentist help greatly. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if a piece of tooth is left after extraction?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your extraction experience. Yes there are some times when a piece of tooth gets left behind; and a lot of times it is done on purpose. Sometimes a small piece of the root of a tooth can break and stay in the tooth socket. At this point, a determination is usually made about if it is worth the extra work on the jaw bone to remove it; or is the patient better off leaving it in there. One example of this is roots of the upper (maxillary) molars. These root tips sit very close to the sinus membrane, and one wrong move, then they can be pushed into the sinus. If one of these roots breaks, then the doctor should consider if it is worth the risk of pushing it into the sinus. Now, once the piece is left behind there are two things that will usually happen. It will either remain in place and no longer be a problem, or it will start to exfoliate on its own. However, usually when a patient feels like there is a piece of tooth left after an extraction, it is normally a bone chip that exfoliated after the extraction. This bone chip stays under the gums but is separate from the jaw bone. At this point the chip will work its way through the gums and come out on its own. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does Invisalign provide permanent results?

    Hello, Good for you for wanting to better your teeth. Invisalign is just a means to the same end as braces. It will only straighten your teeth using a different materials. The results are the same as if someone had braces. Retainers would need to be worn to maintain the results and just like with braces. Invisalign retainers would be very much like the aligners that were worn during the Invisalign and usually only worn at night though. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I get a crown without a root canal?

    Hello, What a great question! The answer is Yes. Dentists follow principles for doing root canals and different principles for doing crowns. However, one of the reasons for doing crowns on the back (posterior) teeth is because a root canal was previously done. This does not go the other way. You do not do a root canal on a back tooth because it is getting a crown. Some of the reasons for doing a root canal include a tooth that has a cavity or decay that has gotten into or too close to the pulp chamber (nerve of the tooth), or the tooth has broken off and the only way to restore it into a tooth is to build it up with a post that would go into the pulp chamber. The reasons for doing a crown are similar to root canal but the decay or fracture is still far enough away from the pulp chamber or nerve that it will not affect it. If it is a back tooth and has had a root canal then a crown is usually indicated to help prevent the tooth from breaking in the future as we use these teeth much more. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why is my cheek swollen after a root canal?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your discomfort and swelling. It is hard to figure out what happened when you were not there. Yes, what your doctor told you is certainly a possibility. There are two common reasons for swelling after a root canal. One is if the cleaning solution got past the end of the root of your tooth. The other is if there is an infection. It is important to know that during a root canal procedure the canal of the tooth is being cleaned of any nerve fibers, blood vessels, or bacteria. If bacteria got past the end of the tooth, it could cause an infection. If some the cleaning solution does get past the end of the root canal it will normally make the cheek swell up (depending on what tooth it is). This usually happens right after the root canal (within hours to a day). The body is not used to having cleaning solution in it (no matter which one was used), this will cause a reaction by the immune system. The immune system has a few responses and the first one is the swelling of the area, which brings more of the immune cells in the blood stream to the area to fight off the infection. Once the solution is dealt with the swelling will go down and usually takes 7-10 days to go away. On rare occasions it can take a little longer then 7-10 days due to a variety of factors. People with diabetes have a harder time healing infections, which takes longer. If it is an infection from the bacteria, that is what the antibiotics are for. The timing of the onset of the swelling usually helps with diagnosis as swelling from the bacteria usually starts 1-2 days after the root canal. It is important to know that it is impossible to be 100% sure of the cause of the swelling so the antibiotics are given no matter what. However, if the dominant bacteria change, then a different antibiotic might be needed to target that bacteria. At 7 days it is advisable to see the person who did the root canal so she can see if you are healing properly or if the root canal needs to be cleaned out again. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What causes teeth to come in crooked?

    Hello, A very interesting question to discuss. Teeth are crooked for a number of reasons; however, they usually come in (erupt) crooked due to a lack of space. This lack of space is usually caused by a skeletal malocclusion (the jaw bones are too small to fit all the teeth) or sometimes a more local problem, like one tooth erupted but leaned over and now the next tooth has to turn to come into the mouth. If our jaws do not grow by the right amount at the right time there will not be enough space for all the teeth to come in and fit side-by-side. Since teeth continue to erupt, they will twist, turn, and lean to fit all the way in. This is also why people used to wear "head gear" braces. These were not to straighten teeth, but to advance or slow down the growth of the jaws to allow the teeth to come in straight. However, they do not stay straight. As we get older, teeth tend to move because they are balancing a few different forces throughout the day. The upper lip is supported by the upper teeth (Think about what someone looks like when they take out their denture). Your upper lip is also supported by your lower teeth (when you rest your mouth, the edges of your upper lip touch your lower lip. This is what we refer to as the wet dry line of the lower lip). Every time we swallow our tongue moves forward and upward and is supported by the upper teeth. As we chew or bite into things we cause forces in different directions. This means teeth are constantly balancing among forces pulling/pushing them in different directions; but, this is all after they erupt or come into the mouth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can missing teeth affect a person's speech?

    Hello, It varies from person to person and from tooth to tooth, but yes, missing teeth usually do affect someone's teeth. However, this usually gets compensated for automatically in a relatively short period of time. The amount it affects the speech depends largely on where and how many teeth are missing. When we speak 's' sounds, our teeth come together and closely touch. This is referred to as the closest speaking space and why it is critical to get right when making dentures. If there is a missing tooth, that creates a gap and allows air to escape through that area. As we say 'f' sounds, we touch our front teeth to our lower lip and force air behind them. A missing front tooth would cause a gap and allow air to escape giving a slight whistling sound. These are just a few of the different sounds that change when a tooth is missing and as mentioned earlier, it will usually be compensated for shortly. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does it take for a clot to form after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, A clot usually forms within minutes of a tooth extraction. If the clotting process did not start that quickly we would never be able to have a tooth extracted as we would lose too much blood. However, it does take some time to get the clot to stabilize and this is why the doctor has the patient bite down on a piece of gauze for 30 minutes after the extraction. After 30 minutes the clot should be stable and if it continues to bleed then a doctor should be contacted immediately (preferably the doctor who took the tooth out, but any professional opinion would be good). If the clot is no longer their after 30 minutes and there is no bleeding then it is possible for alveolar osteitis (dry socket). Dry socket is defined by the formation of a blood clot but then the loss of the blood clot after the extraction. Depending on when this blood clot is lost, it could be a very painful condition and present in a couple different colors. This is because the clot protects the socket, and when it is lost, there is nothing left to protect it by healing. The symptoms of dry socket will usually abate within two weeks and there is a paste that can be put in the socket to take away the pain, but it tastes awful. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is Orajel good for tooth pain?

    Hello, Orajel is just the brand name for benzocaine. When taking medications for any type of pain it is helpful to know what the medication is supposed to do for the pain. Benzocaine is a topical anesthetic; in fact, it is the same topical anesthetic that the dentist puts on before the local anesthesia is injected. This means that as long as the gel can reach the nerves that are causing the tooth pain there is a chance it will provide relief but only temporary relief (10 to 20 minutes on a good day). This also means that nothing is treating the pain, it is ONLY blocking the tooth pain from being recognized by the brain. Another important question to ask is; "has any other medications such as ibuprofen or acetaminophen in the right dose helped"? These medications are designed to treat the cause of the pain and not block it. Ultimately it would be in ones best interest to get a free consultation from a good dentist regarding the source of the pain. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is front tooth extraction the most painful?

    Hello, Extractions are not usually painful at the time of the procedure. Local anesthesia (numbing agent) is given. This takes away the painful feeling, but there will be a good deal of pressure. After the anesthesia has worn off, is usually when the discomfort comes in and there are a few things to know about this. First of all, the condition of the tooth is important to know. If the nerve inside the tooth is still alive and well then it should be noted that in order to extract the tooth this nerve will be severed at the tip of the root. If this nerve has died or the tooth has had a root canal then this is not a problem and discomfort after the extraction should not come from here. Secondly, the amount of roots on the tooth is important. The more roots on the tooth the more force is required to extract the tooth (usually). Even if there is no nerve inside the tooth anymore (like after a root canal) there are nerves around the teeth (in the jaw bone and gums or gingiva). More force on the jaw and gingiva is likely to cause more irritation after the extraction procedure. Fortunately, front teeth usually only have one root. Finally, the quality of the doctor extracting the tooth is sometimes relevant to the amount of discomfort afterward. Some doctors have a tendency for trying to extract the tooth as quickly as possible (through any means necessary). Quickly is perceived to be better by both the doctor and the patient. However, a tooth that takes longer to extract, but is done so with a gentle touch has much less discomfort after the extraction. Hope this help. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can braces cause an overbite?

    Hello, This is a very interesting question but it has a pretty complicated answer. Braces do not usually an overbite; but it is helpful to have a good understanding of some of the terms involved. Overbite refers to the amount teeth (usually front teeth) overlap from top to bottom. Another way of looking at this is how close due the upper front teeth get to the lower front gums. Overjet refers to how far front teeth overlap horizontally. Another way of thinking about overjet is, are the upper front teeth closer to the tip of the nose or the lower front teeth. If there is crowding, this means that there is not enough room for the teeth to stand next to each other so they start rotating and slipping behind each other. In order to fix this the teeth have to be moved to the front of the patients face. Usually what happens is that the braces bring the teeth forward, then straighten them (once forward there is enough room to rotate them) then push them back while they are straight (inter proximal reduction, IPR, can be done at this stage to push them back a little further. Smile-direct club may have some convenience advantages; however, this is where some of its flaws are in treatment. The problem for the patient is that if the lower teeth are not crowded, but the upper teeth are. This means the upper teeth have to get moved forward by the braces but the lower teeth do not. This is increase the overjet, but the not normally the overbite. Overbite is largely dictated by the back teeth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does a gum graft surgery last?

    Hello, There are several different forms of gum graft surgery for a variety of reasons. So the length of time it takes depends on the type of graft you are having and what the reason for it is. Usually the doctor doing the graft surgery will book the chair for more then an hour. This includes time to get you ready, paperwork, and time for local anesthesia to take effect. The actual graft procedure may only take 20 minutes. It is advantageous to make the procedure go quickly as this will lower the risk of the graft failing. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is molar extraction painful?

    Hello, While there is a lot of pressure during the extraction of a tooth there should be no pain during the procedure. The painfulness of after extraction of any tooth depends on a few factors such as; age, tooth, location of tooth, angle of the tooth, how far broken down the tooth is, etc. Age plays the same role as when we worry about elderly people falling and breaking a bone. As we get older our bones become more stiff. When a tooth is extracted the jaw bone has to be flexible around the roots in order for it to come out. This gets happens less when we are older. If the bone is stiffer then the tooth is going to require more force and thought to remove. This means the post-operative discomfort may be more. The type tooth it is does make things more complicated and the amount of discomfort felt afterward could be influenced on how the tooth is extracted. A molar usually has between 2 or 3 roots (sometimes more). The jaw bone around these roots is going to have to be more flexible unless the tooth is sectioned into the individual roots and then removed. Less flexing of the jaw bone usually means less discomfort after the extraction. If the tooth hard to get to then it could mean that there is more force applied in certain areas instead of spreading it around. This may have more discomfort afterward. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What color is the clot after tooth extraction?

    Hello, A clot after an extraction forms the same way most clots do. The extraction site (the socket the tooth sits in) fills with blood shortly after the tooth is extracted. This gives the clot a dark red color. However, this color will most likely changes over the next few days. It can remain dark red or become lighter red. Sometimes if the clot is lost (dry socket or alveolar osteitis) the extraction site will have a white and red appearance. Ultimately the gums will heal over the area and it will have the same color as the rest of the gums. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What can I do for a dry socket?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your dry socket! Dry socket or alveolar osteitis is the loss of the blood clot after a tooth extraction. Depending on when this happens it can be very painful. The blood clot is there to protect the empty tooth socket during the healing process, so if it is lost then there is exposed socket and bone until the gums (gingiva) heals over it. Since the blood clot is lost, the only thing that can be done is to keep there area clean to help promote healing. If the discomfort is bad, then you can go to the dentist that extracted the tooth and have him/her pack the area with dry socket paste. This gets rid of the pain, but it tastes awful. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How common is receding gums?

    Hello, Receding gums happens for a variety of different reasons and because of this it is very common. Most people have receding gums in at least one area of their mouth. One of the biggest reasons for receding gums is periodontal disease (periodontitis). There are a couple different forms of periodontal disease but the most common one usually starts in the persons late 30s or early 40s. The bacteria in plaque cause gingival (gum) inflammation. Then the bone around the tooth starts being resorbed (taken away) and this causes the tooth to become loose. Another common reason for recession is a build up of calculus (hardened plaque). Since this calculus can not be removed by brushing or flossing it sits there and causes the gums to recede away. This is especially true when the calculus is below the gum line. Not to worry because this can be easily cleaned at a dental visit. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How many mm of gum recession is normal?

    Hello, This is a very interesting question. Without getting too much in the the philosophy of the meaning of "normal", recession is something that we do not want any of; however, it does occur in most people in at least one area. There are a few different reasons why this occurs, but 0 mm would be ideal. Seeing as we do not live in an ideal world; we might consider it normal if most people have it; and most people have between 1-3mm of recession. Recession is often not the most important aspect of the gums and most dentist/hygienists are measuring the depth of the gum pockets when then read the millimeters numbers out loud. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you get teeth implants after a root canal?

    Hello, Implants are for replacing teeth, while root canals are usually performed for rebuilding teeth. So when a root canal is performed on a tooth, it is usually believed that the tooth can be saved and built up into a tooth again. Implants are usually used when a tooth is considered hopeless and can not be made into a tooth again. The focus gets shifted into replacing the tooth instead of rebuilding the tooth. However, if the root canal was done a while ago and there is something causing the tooth to be hopeless; yes, an implant can and is often recommended in replacing that tooth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does Listerine kill gingivitis?

    Hello, Listerine kills the germs or bacteria that cause gingivitis. Gingivitis is the inflammation of the gingiva (gum tissue). When certain bacteria take over in a person's mouth they irritate the gingiva and this causes the immune system to try and fight the infection. The gingiva swells up, becomes red, and bleeds easily. Listerine helps in this process by killing the bacteria that irritate the gingiva in the first place. It should be noted that bacteria grow in the hundreds of billions and it only takes one bacterial cell to survive and multiple. Listerine advertises that they kill 99.99% of bacteria (not all bad bacteria). So if bacteria grow to 1 billion and listerine kills 99.99% of them that means there is 0.01% left or 100,000 bacterial cells to start growing again. This is why listerine is needed daily. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if you don't have enough bone for dental implants?

    Hello, This is a very good question! The size, shape, and type of bone is very important for dental implants. Shape is usually compensated for by changing the size of the bone (either increase or decreasing it). There is not much we can do about the type of bone other then alter the size of bone or implant, or alter the healing time for a dental implant. If there is inadequate amount of bone for a dental implant there are a few things that can be done. First of all we increase the amount of bone available. This is accomplished by adding more bone as a graft, lifting up the sinus and adding more bone there, or separating the bone and adding more in the middle. Secondly, we can change the size, shape or type of implant that goes into a certain area. Finally, we can change the area itself that the implant is going to go into. All these factors depend how many teeth and in what manner are the teeth being replaced. There are usually other options to compensate for the lack of adequate bone. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can radiology detect an impacted tooth?

    Hello, That is a great question! Yes, radiology of the correct area can detect impacted teeth. Determining if a tooth is impacted is as simple as just being able to view the tooth in most cases. Visualizing the tooth can be done with an X-ray (radiograph), CT scan (cat scan), or sometimes simply looking at it with your eyes (these are usually just impacted in the gum tissue or gingiva). Just like looking at a wisdom tooth with your eyes an X-ray or CT scan needs to capture the area where the impacted tooth is expected to be. After the X-ray or CT scan is completed; looking at the angle, shape, and position of the tooth will determine if it is impacted or not. Impaction usually occurs with wisdom teeth; however it can occur in any other tooth as well. Upper (maxillary) canine teeth are common to get impacted when then are erupting around age 12. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How fast does gingivitis progress?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your gingivitis. There are a lot of different factors that make gingivitis progress differently for different people. First of all, there are different forms of gingivitis; some of which are very rapid and some which are slow. Secondly, there are patient factors such as immune system, diabetes, habits, and the bite of a patient that can affect the progression of gingivitis. For example, a diabetic person who smokes and has crooked teeth causing more trauma has a lowered immune system which will allow the progression of gingivitis a lot faster than someone who is not diabetic and does not smoke and has no trauma. Finally, there are habits that can be modified easily that will affect the progression of gingivitis; such as frequency of brushing, flossing, and dental cleanings which can really slow it down and possibly stop it in its tracks. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long after crown lengthening can I get a crown?

    Hello, This is a great question! The answer however, is not as straight forward as we would like it to be. First of all, it is important to know the reason why we wait to do a crown after crown lengthening is mainly because we want the gums to heal and know where they are going to end up after the healing process.. A crown that is placed so the edges (margins) of the crown are tucked underneath the gum line gives the best aesthetics. This is obviously something that is more concerning in the front of the mouth then in the back. If the crown is in the back 2 weeks is plenty of time after the crown lengthening. In fact, a lot of times it is preferable to not have the crown tucked under the gum line in the the back of the mouth due to the disadvantages. If the crown is in the front, it could take as little as 2 weeks, but studies have shown that it could take as long as 4 to 8 weeks for complete healing of the gingiva. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a bridge be recemented?

    Hello, Yes, a bridge can be re-cemented! When a bridge comes out, a good dentist will spend some time analyzing why it came out and if it can be re-cemented. Bridges usually come out for 2 reasons; 1) the cement gives way, or 2) a cavity develops around the edges of the bridge. When the cement gives way it could be from 2 different areas. First of all, there is cement holding the bridge to the tooth which can loosen over time. Secondly, there can be cement holding a post into 1 or more teeth. Usually if this post is there it is the cement on the post that gives way first. These can usually go back in, but sometimes they will not because of the angle the post is on. After the doctor makes the determination, he/she will discuss the options with you. If the bridge comes out because a cavity develops around the edges of the bridge, most of the time these can not simply be re-cemented. The cavity needs to be removed and from there the options of the bridge can be discussed. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Will my teeth shift if I lose a molar?

    Hello, This is a good forward thinking question. Yes, most of the time when a molar is removed the teeth around it tend to shift. Teeth behind it usually shift forward and the teeth opposing it (the upper tooth if the one removed is in the lower, and visa-versa) will drift down into the space of where the molar used to be. When this happens it does become a little bit of a headache to replace that tooth in the future, dentistry is all about space. It would involve moving those teeth out of the space one way or another. Think about it this way, our teeth shift all the time without losing a molar. This is why invisalign is so popular and why people are told to wear their retainers for the rest of their lives. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is a fixed dental bridge?

    Hello, A fixed dental bridge is a way to replace one or more missing teeth. If we break down the words "fixed dental bridge" to what they mean it helps a lot. The word "fixed" refers to the fact that the bridge is fixed in place and cannot be taken out (not without a lot of effort at least). This is in contrast to something that we refer to as "removable" (like a denture that gets taken out every night). Obvious "dental" refers to dentistry and teeth. "Bridge is exactly like a bridge you drive over. There is a road on each side that support the road in middle from the sides. In dentistry there are a couple ways to accomplish this. The most common way is to put a crown on the teeth next to the one being replaced and simply suspend a false tooth in the toothless area from the sides of the crown. The whole thing then gets cemented in place. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you get a bridge for 3 missing teeth?

    Hello, Yes, depending on the circumstances, bridges can be made for 3 missing teeth. However, this can get tricky depending on if the 3 missing teeth are in a row, not in a row, in a row and in the back, and what kind of teeth they are. Bridges to replace the 4 lower front teeth are made everyday. When we start talking about back teeth is when it starts getting complicated. If the teeth are all in a row we need strong teeth with good roots on either side to help balance the forces of chewing (we do not usually chew on our front teeth, only bite into things). In this case it would be worth it to have a conversation about making an implant bridge to replace the teeth. If the teeth are not in a row this presents its own challenges and can also be replaced by implants. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you floss under braces?

    Hello, Flossing under braces takes a lot more time, concentration, and patience. The wire is the part that really makes flossing difficult, so whenever the wire is changed flossing in the regular manner should be taken advantage of. In the mean time, floss needs to be threaded around the wire and then between the teeth. This can sometimes be done easily in the front; however, if is not due to the flimsy nature of floss, there are floss-threaders that can be purchased at the local pharmacy. Floss threads are thin strip of plastic with an eye-loop at one end. The floss can be tied to the eye-loop and the rigidity of the plastic will help guide it around the wire. Then the floss can be used between the teeth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does Invisalign look natural?

    Hello, As the age old saying goes, beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Invisalign usually involves two parts; the clear aligners and the tooth matching attachments put onto the teeth. The clear aligners are usually the same for everyone; however, the attachments vary in which teeth they are on and how many teeth they go on. Most of the time both the aligners and the attachments blend in and they are not noticed (I personally had to stare at my mother-in-laws teeth to figure out if she had the aligners in whenever I saw her). However, some patients do tend to focus on them so they notice them every time they look into the mirror. The other thing to consider is that most invisalign treatments are completed in 6 months or less. So is it something that can be dealt with for 4-6 months? Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What causes your gums to bleed?

    Hello, Gums can bleed because they are inflamed. Just like when someone falls and hits their arm it swells up; gums (or gingival tissue) does the same time. Also if there is an infection in the skin it would swell (get inflamed) up and this is also true of the gums. The question then becomes; "What causes the swelling?" Just like someone's arm, the gums can swell up from trauma; however, this is not usually the case. The usual cause is a bacterial or foreign body (food) infection. When the body detects bacterial or some other material where there should be none, the immune system reacts and tries to fight it. The first response of the immune system is to swell up to allow immune cells to the area. A lot of times this bacteria is in the plaque between the teeth. Most people stop flossing when they see blood because they feel they are doing something wrong. However, In this case stepping up one's flossing game by flossing more often usually disrupts the plaque and therefore the bacteria. The gums will lose their inflammation an stop bleeding in a couple days. Hope this helps My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why do you rinse with salt water after a root canal?

    Hello, Good for you for asking a great question! A warm salt water rinse is an antiseptic technique. It is used to keep things clean, mainly the gingiva (gum tissues). When a root canal is performed a rubber dam is usually used and this is to help keep the area clean. The canal of a tooth is normally bacteria-free and the goal at the end of the root canal is to keep it bacteria-free. Usually a warm salt water mouth rinse after a root canal keeps the amount of bacteria in the mouth lower and is simply just going one step further. Truth of the matter is, the tooth that has had the root canal needs to be sealed off at the end. If it is not sealed off bacteria will get in there no matter how many warm salt water rinses are done. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What color should a tooth extraction site be?

    Hello, Sorry to hear that your 19 year old son had to have a tooth extracted. The extraction site can be a few different colors depending on what is going on. We would like to see a nice pink gingiva (gum tissue) with a darker reddish area in the middle. This is usually what an extraction site without complications usually looks like. However, there could be variations to this appearance if there was periodontal disease before the tooth was extracted. This would look similar but there would be little of the pink area and more of the dark red area. Secondly, the area can be red with splotchy areas of white. This is a common presentation of dry socket. The color will change back to the pink after healing of the tooth. If the tooth that was extracted was a wisdom tooth, then dry socket is more likely. The trick with dry socket is that it has very different appearances in different people. Some times it can look real white and somtimes it can have some yellow to it. The problem with this is that lots of white or yellow can suggest other things like infection. As always the best thing to do with something that looks concerning is to call the doctor who extracted the tooth and consult with him/her. If unsatisfied with this a second opinion can be helpful. Hope this helps. My best to you and your son! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does it take to get a tooth pulled?

    Hello, What a great question! The answer can vary depending on circumstances such as health status, amount of teeth being pulled (extracted), location of the tooth, and possible impaction of the tooth. If the person is in good health, only having one tooth pulled (extracted), it is generally scheduled for an hour. This includes the paperwork that needs to be gone over before and after the extraction (consent for the extraction before and then post-op instructions about how to care for the extraction afterward. If it is a tooth that is in the front and it has suffered from periodontal disease then this process will be a little shorter. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Will antibiotics help a dry socket?

    Hello, No antibiotics will not help dry socket (alveolar osteitis). After an extraction of a tooth the socket that the bone sits in immediately forms a blood clot; just like any other cut on the body. This clot helps protect the area while the jaw bone and gum tissues heal and fill in. Dry socket is the lost of this blood clot and it can present in a variety of ways. Most of the time it will have some level of discomfort (usually less discomfort the longer it was before the lost of the clot. Antibiotics are used together with the immune system to fight a bacterial infection. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD Deluxe Dental Group READ MORE

  • How long do you have to wear gauze after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, The amount of time to use gauze after a tooth extraction can vary from person to person. After getting a tooth extracted the patient is asked to bite down on gauze that is strategically placed over the area where the tooth was. The purpose of this gauze is to help form a clot and get the bleeding to stop. After the bleeding has stopped the gauze can be removed. Usually this process takes about 30 minutes; however, there are some factors that can prolong it. For example, if a patient is on blood thinners or has hemophilia it takes a longer time to form a blood clot. The doctor who extracts the tooth should go over this after the tooth is extracted. Also if it takes longer then 30 minutes for the bleeding to stop the doctor should be called and notified. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long should you wait to eat after getting a tooth pulled?

    Hello, What a great question! First off all, if you are not being put to sleep for the extraction then it is better to make sure you eat before the extraction. This will do 2 things: 1) it will ease the burden about when to eat after the extraction; and 2) it will keep your nutrition up and make the extraction and feeling afterward more pleasant. However, as far as how long to wait after the extraction before eating there are a few things to keep in mind. First of all, there will be gauze to bite down on to help form a blood clot where the extraction was done. This usually takes approximately 30 minutes to happen. Secondly, local anesthesia is given in the area of the extraction so there will be a profound numb feeling in that area. The numb feeling will make it difficult to eat or drink without drooling. It is best to wait until the numbness has worn off and there is no more bleeding. The numbness usually takes about an hour and a half to wear off, but this depends on the type of anesthesia that was given and when it was given. Finally it is important to consider what is eaten after a tooth extraction. It is better to eat softer non- sticky foods. It is also important to avoid hot or spicy foods (hot foods will promote bleeding and spicy foods will irritate the area). It is also important to avoid drinking through a straw, spitting, or dragging on a cigarette as this can change the pressure in your mouth and loosen the clot. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a dentist pull an infected tooth?

    Hello, This is a very good question. Sorry to hear about your infected tooth. Yes, a dentist can pull (extract) an infected tooth; however, there are some times when a dentist has to wait for an infection to clear before he/she pulls a tooth. A cavity is caused by bacteria on and then in the tooth. By definition a tooth with a cavity is an infected tooth. This cavity can get bigger to the point of reaching and going far beyond the nerve of the tooth. It is still an infected tooth. However, it may get to the point of an abscess forming. This is when the bacteria have made it to the end of the root and the body is trying to fight the infection. Sometimes while the body is fighting the infection the tissues around the tooth will swell up. It is at this point that the dentist should not pull the tooth. When the gum tissues and some times cheeks swell up due to the infected tooth the swelling inactivates the local anesthesia that is used. This means that it is difficult to get numb. At this point the doctor will usually give a prescription for an antibiotic and have the patient come back in a week when the swelling is gone. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why does my filling hurt when I chew?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your fillings hurting. There are a few things that can cause the teeth with fillings in them to hurt, including; filling is slightly too high, filling is too close to the pulp chamber (center of the tooth where the nerve and blood vessels are), or there is a cavity or decay underneath of the filling. First of all, if the fillings are relatively new, it is a good chance that the filling is slightly too high. When the filling was placed there was most likely local anesthesia (numbing) involved. By the time the fillings were completed the local anesthesia still had not worn off so it is hard to tell if the filling is a little high. This is especially possible if there were multiple fillings done at the same time. This common to realize right after the fillings are done, but it can be some time after as well. Secondly, sometimes the cavity in the tooth gets too close to the pulp chamber (were the nerve and blood vessels sit). This usually causes discomfort all the time but it can gradually get worse over time when chewing (micro fractures can occur in the tooth around the filling). The filling moving around as well. Finally, fillings can start to hurt if they get a cavity underneath of them. Most of the time the filling will look intact but there is a small cavity underneath of it allowing the bacteria to make the tooth sensitive. This is less likely if it is more then one filling. These are just some of the common causes for filling to hurt. It is best to have them evaluated by a doctor. It could be as simple as a small adjustment that only takes a few seconds. Hope this helps. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can surrounding teeth hurt after an extraction?

    Hello, Yes, it is possible for surrounding teeth to hurt after an extraction. To understand the reason for this it is helpful to understand how extractions work. Teeth have long, sometimes curvy, and somtimes multiple roots on different angles. There are a few different techniques for removing teeth; however, the concept is still the same. The root of the tooth sits in a socket and is attached by ligament fibers (this is so they don't fall out on their own). In order to take the tooth out, these ligament fibers need to be separated and the socket the root sits in needs to expand ever so slightly. This process can cause irritation in the jaw or nerve that goes to the other teeth leaving them sore afterward. The discomfort should subside soon afterward though. If not it would be best to go back to the doctor who extracted the teeth for an evaluation. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Should I still be in pain a week after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, A week after the extraction of a tooth discomfort should be settling down. This is if everything is normal and there are no complications. An extracted tooth with be sore for a few days, but it should be gradually getting better. However, there are some other things that can cause discomfort. First thing that one should consider is the possibility of dry socket. Dry socket simply means that the blood clot that forms after the tooth is extracted is lost. This can make the color of the gums look different or look completely normal; however, often times there is more pain then when the tooth was there. This is because the clot that was lost protects the healing tooth socket and now it is exposed. Secondly, the peak onset for swelling after an extraction is 4 days. This means that swelling can start up to 4 days after the extraction of the tooth and then start to taper after that. Again the discomfort should be tapering off. Swelling causes pressure on everything around it which causing discomfort. Finally, depending on the circumstances there could be a little tiny bone chip that is trying to exfoliate (make its way out of the gums). This tends to happen as the jaw bone is trying to re-structure itself after the tooth is removed. All of this depends on the tooth that was extracted, how it was extracted, the amount of trauma during the extraction, and situation of the tooth extracted. It would be best to contact the doctor who extracted since he/she is the one that was there and knows what happened during the procedure. This is usually free of charge since it is part of the extraction procedure. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does the hole from a pulled tooth close?

    Hello, Yes the hole from a pulled (extracted) tooth will close. It takes a few weeks for this to happen because the jaw bone needs to restructure itself since it no longer needs to support the tooth. The jaw will no long big as big or robust so replacement of the tooth in the future will be more difficult. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a toothache affect your ear?

    Hello, Depending on what tooth it is a toothache can cause discomfort that feels like it is coming from your ear. This usually does not mean there is anything wrong with your ear. It just means that the toothache is radiating outward and the nerves carrying the signal travel close to your ear. Of course this does not usually happen for teeth that don't have nerves that travel near the ear. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a dentist fill a cavity on the gum line?

    Hello, Yes a dentist can fill a cavity on the gum line (gingiva). These cavities usually dip below the gum line as well. The gums sit around the tooth much like a shirt sleeve sits around your hand when you make a fist. At some point the gum will be attached to the tooth but it is important to get the cavity (decay) out. This gum is no longer attached where the cavity is. So special instruments are used to reach below the gum line and remove the cavity completely without disturbing the gum line. The filling is then put in where the cavity was and everything is smoothed and polished. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the best medication for an abscess tooth?

    Hello, Good question! First it would be best to verify that you have a tooth with an abscess. A lot of people just make the assumption that because they have pain in a tooth for a day or two they have an abscess. In fact, a number of people wake up with pain for a couple days in a row and assume they have an abscess only to find out that they were grinding their teeth in the middle of the night. However, if there is an abscess this would get treated much differently. First off, if treatment can not be started that day and there is swelling an antibiotic would be recommended. The type of antibiotic would depend on a couple of factors. Amoxicillin or clindamycin are usually the top two antibiotics used. Which one depends on a few factors including allergies and stomach irritation. Any history of issues with medications would be helpful here. Finally, the doctor may give you something for immediate pain control. This varies by the patients ability to take medications and the doctors comfort level with giving medications. The medications that usually do the best is a combination of ibuprofen (advil or motrin) and acetaminophen (tylenol). The usual dose is 600mg ibuprofen with 500mg acetaminophen every 6 hours as needed. Again, this depends on the person's ability to take medications without side effects. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does dental implant surgery take?

    Hello, Dental implant surgery can involve a variety of different procedures, from simply having an implant put in to having multiple implants put in, or an extraction of a tooth followed by an implant, or a bone graft with the implant. For the placement of one implant without an extraction of a tooth or bone graft a patient is usually scheduled for 1 hour. Most of this time will be used for paper work and local anesthesia (getting numb). It is likely that it will only take 40 minutes or so. If more needs to be done the patient will be scheduled for 1 hour to an hour and a half. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long before antibiotics work on infected teeth?

    Hello, Great question! Antibiotics are not commonly used until the immune system has a major reaction to the infected tooth. After all, a cavity is an infected tooth, technically speaking, but we cannot treat a cavity with antibiotics. Antibiotics are usually prescribed when there is swelling of the gum tissues (gingiva) or face (facial cellulitis). This is not a cure for the infected tooth, antibiotics only work with the immune system to fight the infection. The infection is still there; but the antibiotics help keep the the infection down and minimize the swelling. Swelling tends to inactivate local anesthesia (the person will not be able to get numb). It usually takes the antibiotics 48 hours to get up a therapeutic level and start working; however, it will normally take about week to get down to normal and proceed with removing the infection. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a decaying tooth cause jaw pain?

    Hello, Yes a decaying tooth can cause jaw pain. A cavity in a tooth starts out small and if left untreated usually gets bigger and grows toward the pulp chamber of the tooth (where the nerve and blood vessels are). As it gets closer the blood vessels in the pulp chamber swell up and interfere with the nerve inside the tooth. These nerves send pain signals to the brain. If this persists the decay (cavity) will get bigger and form a hole into the pulp chamber and the nerve will be exposed to everything that goes in the mouth. This will cause the nerve to send even more pain signals to the brain and eventually the pain will radiate into the jaw. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you relieve the pressure of an abscessed tooth?

    Hello, There are only a few ways to relieve the pressure of an abscessed tooth. The first way is simple: Remove the tooth. If the tooth is removed, the empty socket will relieve the pressure at the tip of the roots. More importantly, it will remove the infection which will allow the abscess to heal. The second way to remove the pressure from an abscessed tooth is to do a root canal or pulpectomy (cleaning of the root canal system to clean an infection). Cleaning out the inside of the tooth by doing a root canal or pulpectomy will relieve the pressure as well as clean out the infection that is causing the abscess. Finally, the third way to relieve the pressure from an abscessed tooth is to have an incision and drainage done. This means having a doctor make an incision through the gums (gingival tissue) to give the abscess a place to drain reducing the pressure. This does not remove the source of the infection and further treatment like a root canal or extraction will be needed. This is the usual course of action if there is a lot swelling and the patient can not open wide enough to have a different procedure done. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What could be the cause of front tooth pain?

    Hello, Front tooth pain can be caused by a number of things; which is why a dentist generally asks a lot of questions when someone first comes in with tooth pain. Some of the question include; Sharp or dull pain? When did the pain start? Where you eating when the pain started? Does anything make the pain worse or better? Have you taken any medication for the pain? These questions in addition to an exam and X-rays will help determine the cause of pain. For instance, if it is sharp stabbing pain and the X-ray shows a cavity that is close to the pulp chamber (where the nerve is) it is likely that the pain is from a cavity that is irritating the pulp chamber of the tooth. Or, if the X-ray shows the tooth is intact but the pain started while eating after something hard was bit down on, then it is likely that the pain was caused from trauma and perhaps treating it medically will get rid of the pain. The best thing would be to go to a dentist and have an evaluation done. Knowledge that it is nothing major could at least ease the burden. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I get a filling if I am pregnant?

    Hello, The short answer to whether someone can get a filling if they are pregnant is yes; however, it does require some extra thought and work. Things to consider when a filling is needed during pregnancy is local anesthesia, radiographs (X-rays), anxiety, and any complications of the pregnancy. The first step that should be done is to inform your OB/GYN about the need for a filling and the dentist about your pregnancy. At this point, the OB/GYN will make some recommendation based on how complicated the pregnancy is going. Most of the time, with no complications, the OB/GYN will make these recommendation: 1) only treatment that can not wait until after delivery. This just means no elective dental treatment beside routine cleanings. This is something to keep in mind if it has been a difficult pregnancy so far, or if conception was difficult. Remember, in the end it is a tooth and not a baby. 2) Avoid dental X-rays if possible. If this is not possible use a double shield technique (2 lead vests). 3) Use local anesthesia without epinephrine in it. Other than this, the safest time during pregnancy for dental work is the second trimester. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a deep cavity be filled?

    Hello, Yes, a deep cavity can be filled; however, it depends on how deep and the location of the cavity. In dentistry, when we refer to a deep cavity we usually mean that is close to the pulp chamber (where the nerves of the tooth reside). One could imagine that it would be painful to put a filling on top of a nerve. If the cavity goes right into the pulp chamber then it is too deep to fill and a root canal would be required provided the tooth is able to be restored. On the other hand, if the cavity does not go into the pulp chamber, then a good dentist will remove the cavity and the bacteria that have caused it. At this point, an assessment will be made about whether there is enough tooth structure over the pulp chamber to support a filling. If not, then a root canal would be required. If there is the filling would be placed and the tooth would be closely examined at the following dental check ups and cleanings. If the tooth becomes sensitive in the future then a root canal may be needed at that time. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can cavities on the side of the tooth be filled?

    Hello, Cavities on the side of a tooth can be filled. In fact they are filled every day. The specific tooth, specific side of the tooth, and the position of the tooth determines how the cavity is filled. Most fillings done in a given day are on the side of back teeth. These type of fillings are usually associated with inadequate amount of flossing which usually is a reflection of the population. Most people brush their teeth daily but few floss daily or at all. That being said it is still possible to get a cavity between the teeth even with flossing as it is harder to clean between teeth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What to do about gum surgery complication?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your complication to surgery. It would be best to call the surgeon since he/she is the person that knows the most about what type of surgery was done. It is po My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How many years do fillings last?

    Hello, The longevity of a filling is one of the hardest things to predict in dentistry. The reason for this is because there are so many variables: The specific tooth the filling is on, how many surfaces of the tooth the filling replaces, the type of bite on the filling, what material is being used for the filling, the person doing the filling, etc. It goes on and on. The goal of any good dentist is to get the filling to last as long as possible. A lot of studies have shown that the average amount of time a filling lasts is 10-12 years. However, these studies do take years to complete and newer materials come out every year (sometimes better, sometimes worse). It is also interesting to note that most studies show that silver amalgam fillings last longer then tooth colored composite fillings. When studying the average length of a dental filling it is important to consider that this average of 10-12 years has a range. Some of these fillings can last 30 years while some may only last 2 years. Hope this helps My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do I have to treat dental fissure cavities?

    Hello, Cavities can be treated in a few different ways. However, cavities should be treated or at the very least closely watched (which is a form of treatment). Fissure simply refers to an area of a tooth; for example, a cavity in a fissure of the tooth. A cavity in there are is common but it is also very tricky to diagnose. The pits and fissures of teeth tend to pick up staining which may look like a cavity. They also may have the characteristic "stickiness" to them (sticking instruments into pits an fissures is no longer recommended) which may have more to do with the anatomy (shape) of the tooth then a cavity. As stated above there are a few ways to treat cavities depending on the type and severity of the cavity. One is to remove the cavity and bacteria that cause it with a drill or laser. Another way is if they are small to treat them with fluoride. If someone is really unsure about whether a cavity needs to be treated, it is always best to get a second opinion (usually are free of charge). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do gaps in teeth get bigger with age?

    Hello, Gaps between teeth (diastemas) can get bigger with age. To know where the gaps will get bigger with relative certainty, it would be helpful to know what has been causing the gaps. Gaps between teeth are formed from a variety of different things from overgrowth of the jaw, large frenum (muscular gum attachment under the lip) pulling on the gums, teeth tipped out too far for one reason or another, or simply the need of a retainer. Which ever the reason, teeth balance the forces in the mouth. If the gaps between teeth are caused by the overgrowth of the jaw it is less likely that the gaps will get bigger as the jaws do not grow much after age 22. However, if there is a frenum pulling on the gums and a retainer is needed, the gaps are more likely to get bigger with age. The best thing someone can do for themselves is to have a free consultation with a dentist/orthodontist and discuss the likelihood of the gaps growing. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Will my teeth fall out from receding gums?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your receding gums. Yes, in theory someone's teeth can fall out from receding gums (gingiva). This can happen when they are younger in their teens or twenties (aggressive periodontitis) or it can happen when they are much older (chronic periodontitis). Chronic periodontitis is more common then aggressive; however, our habits also affect the our gums. Hard bristle tooth brush and heavy handed brushing will cause someone's gums to recede as well. This type of recession usually has sensitivity long before teeth get loose enough to fall out though. Since there are a few things that can cause receding gums it would be in your best interest to get an evaluation from a dentist (usually at no cost). Then you will have a better idea of what is causing your receding gums and how best to prevent any teeth from falling out. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is a dental bridge a good option for missing teeth?

    Hello, Asking if a dental bridge is a good option for missing teeth is the first step in the right direction! The simplest answer that I can give is: Yes, depending on the circumstances a dental bridge is a good option to replace a missing tooth. This comes with a caveat though. Years ago dental bridges were done all the time because they were the best way of replacing teeth. Now-a-days, dental implants have become so successful that in a lot of scenarios implants are the best way to replace a missing tooth. This does not mean that in all situations an implant is the best way to replace a missing tooth. For example, if one tooth is missing and the teeth on either side of the missing tooth area have cavities large enough to require crowns, then it might be in the patients best interest to have a dental bridge replace the missing tooth. The bridge would fill the missing tooth area as well as put crown on the teeth that need them (2 birds 1 stone). Another example would be a tooth that has been missing for a while. When we loose a tooth the jaw bone starts atrophying (resorbing) and the teeth around the missing tooth start drifting into that space. This means that there is not enough space in the jaw bone to put an implant in and there is not enough space to put a tooth in. Both of these are usually remedied with a dental bridge easier then a dental implant. Finally, a dental implant usually costs about the same amount as a dental bridge, until procedures like bone grafts and orthodontics are required. So simply from a cost point of view a dental bridge could be a better choice then a dental implant. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do they put you to sleep for a dental bone graft?

    Hello, There are a variety of reasons to put someone to sleep during a dental procedure. Occasionally the actual dental procedure is the reason that the person needs to be put to sleep but more often then not it is something else. There are a few different types of bone grafts but a dental bone itself is not a reason to put someone to sleep. Usually a dental bone graft is done with local anesthesia. Anxiety is something that causes people to be put to sleep for dental procedures. Now if someone needs a bone graft and has anxiety about it, that would be a consideration to put the person to sleep. A bone graft is not usually invasive so this idea might be rejected though. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if you don't wear your retainer for a month?

    Hello, Not wearing a retainer for a month is likely to allow slight shifting of a persons teeth. Unfortunately, when someone gets their teeth straightened, we spent a lot of time discussing the treatment of moving teeth and complications but very little time gets spent on retention of the teeth. It is important to understand what causes teeth to move in the first place. Our jaw bones, which anchor our teeth in place, are dynamic (they are always changing in response to forces). Our teeth have to balance the force of our lips (our teeth support our lips. Think of someone who takes their dentures out. Their lips sink in.). Our teeth also have to endure the force of our tongue as it moves around and when we swallow (every time we swallow our tongue lifts up and goes to the front of our mouth). Our teeth (more so our jaw bones) are able to resist these forces but only for short amounts of time. This is when we put in the retainer at night to help support the teeth and jaw bone. Not wearing a retainer for a month will likely allow the teeth to shift but only slightly. The retainer is likely to go in but only by force (which should not be done). The good news is that the shifting of the teeth should be minor and not cause much of a difference aesthetically; so a new retainer can be made and just maintain the teeth in their current location. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long do composite fillings last?

    Hello, Composite fillings can last a lifetime. However, that does not mean that they will last a life time. Putting a timeline on how long any type of filling will last is difficult because there are a lot of variables that can cause a filling to fail (The size of the filling, the location of the filling, the specific tooth the filling is on, the type of composite the is used for the filling, the types of food the person likes to eat, the amount of brushing and flossing, etc.). That being said, most studies have shown that the average lifespan for a composite filling is just over 10 years (just a little short of silver fillings). It is important to understand that this is an average over the population, and all the variables mentioned above. There have been plenty of people that have had fillings for over 30 years and they are still intact. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long do white fillings take to set?

    Hello, White (tooth colored) fillings are not like the old silver fillings that take 24 hours to fully set. White fillings are set with a curing light. The dentist uses an instrument that looks like a wand and emits a blue light. The blue light turns the white filling material from soft pliable material to a hard material. The goal of curing a white filling is to have it fully cured or set before the patient leaves the dental chair. To prevent biting of the lip or tongue it is advisable to wait until the anesthesia wears off to eat or drink (provided that you have had enough food prior to the appointment). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I get a filling without a root canal?

    Hello, Yes it is possible to get a filling without a root canal. Most people fall into this category. However, it is possible to get a root canal without a filling as well (this is very rare). Usually fillings result from a small cavity. As time passes a cavity gets bigger and bigger. In order to get rid of the cavity, the bacteria and decayed tooth structure need to be removed. Once the decay and bacteria are removed the filling goes into the area to give the tooth its natural shape back. If the cavity has been there too long the bacteria will go deeper into the tooth until they reach the center of the tooth (pulp chamber) where nerve and blood vessels are. At this point a root canal is needed to get the bacteria out of the nerve of the tooth. Prior to this a filling or crown would be attempted. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is a white filling better than silver?

    Hello, Is a white filling (tooth colored fillings) better than a silver filling; this is an excellent question! The answer is both yes and no (as it is with anything that has both pros and cons). Both white and silver fillings have pros and cons to them. Most research has shown that silver fillings do last longer then white fillings. However, this comes with a large grain of salt. Silver fillings have not changed much over the last 50 years; while white fillings are constantly being developed. Most of the time research is old and does not represent the latest white fillings. Also the difference in longevity between silver and white fillings is very minor. Most of the time silver fillings require more tooth structure to be removed then do white fillings. Sometimes the amount of tooth structure is minor but sometimes it is unnecessary. It is also important to consider aesthetics. Most people consider silver fillings to have no aesthetic value at all; white a nicely matched white filling will go unnoticed. The significance of this may make a difference to a person if the tooth is in the back or the front. Finally, for a long time silver fillings have been associated with mercury. This is a substance that a lot of people do not want in their body even if the risk or harm is very low. However, this does not mean that white fillings are safe. White fillings were originally made with BPA (Bisphenol A). Bisphenol A is a compound that has been associated with plastics and causes behavior problems especially in children. So when choosing a white filling over a silver one, it is important to know if it is BPA free or not. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How can you tell if you have a deep cavity?

    Hello, It is very difficult to tell if a deep cavity is present without some experience and an x-ray (radiograph). However, there are some signs and symptoms that can suggest the possibility of a deep cavity. First of all it is important to rule some things in. Deep cavities usually have some sensitivity or down right painful times. Deep cavities usually also have darkened (black or brown) enamel around the edges of the tooth. If brown or black spots can be seen and it is a cavity, chances are it goes much deeper. Secondly, there are some things that should be ruled out. If there is gum (gingival) recession around the tooth and the only symptom is sensitivity, the cause of the sensitivity could very well be the gum recession and not a deep cavity. If any of these are suspected a visit to a dentist for an exam and x-ray will help out a lot. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do some dentists do unnecessary fillings?

    Hello, Good for you to be so bold to ask a great and important question. Unfortunately, the answer to your question is Yes. Unnecessary fillings happen every day for a number of reasons. Firstly, unnecessary fillings happen due to lack of experience. Dentist are taught about cavities until they are blue in the face in dental school. When they reach the clinic they are taught by a variety of different dentist how to detect them. This is where differing opinions between part time faculty members can really shape a dentists perspective and diagnostic skills. Secondly, dentist often do fillings because if they are unsure about whether there is a cavity they believe that it is better to do the filling then to let a cavity get much worse in the next 6 months and now the patient needs a root canal. Finally, just like any profession there are bad people out there. Unfortunately dentistry is a profession where bad people thrive because patients have little knowledge about their dentistry and it is not something people want to worry about. This is called over-treatment and it is an area that is much larger then most people in the dental industry like to admit or talk about. Either way, the best way someone can protect themselves from unnecessary fillings is to get a second opinion from another dentist (which are usually free). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I get my fillings changed to white?

    Hello, Yes, fillings can be changed from silver to white. This is something that a lot of people contemplate on a daily basis. There are a few different things to consider before replacing silver fillings with white fillings (tooth colored fillings). First of all, silver fillings that have been there for years often tend to stain the tooth around the silver. When this happens and the reason for removing the silver filling is for aesthetics, the part of the tooth around the filling is going to have to be removed for the best results. This layer can stay as there is nothing wrong with it; but, it will leave a silver ring around the new white filling. The second thing to consider is the idea of mercury. Most silver fillings have mercury in them and it is stable inside the filling. The silver filling is removed by a drill and the mercury gets vaporized. At this point it gets in the body by being inhaled as the patient and dentist breath (worse so for the dentist because he/she is breathing it on every patient). Finally, the size of the filling may dictate that replacing the silver filling (especially if the silver ring around the tooth has to be removed as well) may be removed but a white filling may not be able to replace it. In this case more advanced dentistry, such as crowns, would have to replace the silver filling. If none of these points are of concern, then changing silver fillings to white fillings should not be a problem. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How many times can a filling be replaced?

    Hello, It is very forward thinking to wonder how many times a filling can be replaced! The short answer to this is as many times as needed. However, life does not work out the way we want it to in theory. The size and location of the filling is going to dictate a lot when it comes to how many times a filling can be replaced. First of all, a filling is generally only replaced when it is failing. A filling can fail from leaking or another cavity around the filling. If the filling fails because it is leaking this usually means that there is minimal damage to the tooth around the filling and just the filling material needs to be removed. However, if the filling is failing because there is a cavity around the filling, the old filling and the new cavity both need to be removed. This means the size of the filling is going to get bigger. The cavity can only get so big before other treatment modalities (crowns, root canals, etc.) are required. Usually the filling can be replaced a handful of times before this stage manifests. The location and size of the filling can change things a bit. If the filling is in an area of the tooth that is down by the gum line and is moderate in size it is going to be hard to replace if another cavity starts around the filling. This may mean it has to go right to a crown instead of replacing the filling. Do not worry so. Following up at the dentist every 6 months for cleanings and check ups (these are the things the dentist is looking at during the check ups) is the best way to ensure the filling never has to be replaced. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the safest dental filling?

    Hello, The safest dental filling is a very good question to ask. Unfortunately, it is an extremely difficult question to answer. There are many different types of filling materials out there and they all have their pros and cons. However, lets look at the basic silver fillings and the white (tooth colored) fillings. The longest lasting silver filling tends to have mercury in it. This mercury tends to stay stable inside the filling; however, people do not want it in their body at all. White fillings started becoming popular and then it was discovered that they were made with BPA (Bisphenol A). BPA is a compound that was common in plastics and was associated with behavioral defects. Fortunately there are BPA-free white filling materials that can be used. Aside from these two main filling materials, there are some other materials that actually leach out ions like fluoride. These are great for the teeth and protecting them from further cavities; however, this again puts fluoride into the patient's body. A BPA-free white filling (composite) is usually the answer here, but depending on the circumstances it could be a bad choice. It is best to talk this over with the dentist who is going to be placing the fillings before hand. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you put a white filling over a silver filling?

    Hello, Putting a white filling (tooth colored filling) over a silver filling is a good idea; however, in practice it does not work out to well. A silver filling does not get bonded, cemented, or glued to the tooth. It goes in as a powder and hardens into a solid. At this point the silver filling is basically balanced in the tooth. A silver filling requires certain dimensions to remain balanced. In order to put a white filling over the silver filling, the silver filling would have to be shortened to make room for the white filling. This would change the size and shape of the silver filling losing its balance. Once this happens the white filling would then be unsupported and break off. The second part of the failure for a white filling to stay over a silver filling is because a white filling gets bonded to the tooth structure; but it can not be bonded to the silver filling. This would mean that at least one wall of the white filling would not be bonded to the tooth giving it less ability to stay in the tooth. Unfortunately for now there is no good way to put a white filling over a silver filling (plus the silver filling would show through the white filling). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does having a filling replaced hurt?

    Hello, Having a filling replaced usually does not hurt at all. Most of the time people do not even know it has happened after the anesthesia (numbness) wears off. There are some rare times that having a filling replaced can hurt (usually afterwards); but a qualified dentist will go over the possibilities and any complications that may arise in advance. If a previous filling or a cavity under the filling has gotten too close to the nerve of the tooth there can be sensitivity after the anesthesia wears off. The dentist will usually show the person on the x-ray and discuss the likelihood and the course of action from there. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why does my filling hurt when I chew?

    Hello, A tooth can have discomfort after a filling for a few different reasons depending on the size and location of the cavity that was filled, the type of material used for the filling, and the adjustment afterwards. First, the size and location of the cavity is very important when doing fillings. If it is too close the the pulp chamber (center of the tooth, where the nerve is) it can cause sensitivity after the filling is placed; kind of like missing insulation. This usually goes away. Secondly, the type of material used for the filling matters as well because they all have different properties. These properties can lead to symptoms like sensitivity afterwards. For example, tooth color fillings (white fillings) tend to have less insulating properties then the old silver ones. This again leads to sensitivity. Third, if the filling only hurts when chewing on it, there is a good chance that the filling is "...a little high". When someone gets a filling they usually have anesthesia in that area and have a hard time feeling things. At the end of the procedure patient bites down on a paper to determine if the height of the filling accurate. Sometimes the anesthesia (numbness) causes the patient to bite not in their natural bite. If an area of the filling gets missed then it does not get adjusted to the proper height. Once the anesthesia wears off the patient then bites normally again and constantly hits the high spot causing discomfort while chewing. This is usually a simple adjustment with the dentist who did the filling and there is not normally a charge as it is associated with the filling. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • When can I stop worrying about my dry socket?

    Hello, Dry socket usually occurs in the first two days after a tooth is extracted (removed). First it is important to know what dry socket is. Alveolar osteitis (also known as dry socket) is the loss of the blood clot. When a tooth is extracted there is a socket left behind. Like any wound (including the socket) on our body the first thing to happen is the formation of a blood clot. This clot helps healing and helps protect the socket area from bacteria and food debris in the mouth. If the blood clot lost, this protection is lost. The resulting dry socket can be painful. After a couple days tissue has started to heal by now and the socket has closed up some. The risk for dry socket is less but not completely gone. It is also worth mentioning that the later the dry socket comes on, the less severe the symptoms tend to be. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you get tooth decay under a filling?

    Hello, A tooth can get decay under a filling. The filling that was done in the tooth prior to the decay was only done to remove the decay the first time. Decay under a filling is referred to as secondary caries or secondary decay by dentists. In fact, a tooth is more susceptible decay when a filling has been placed because that filling needs to be sealed and remain sealed. Sometimes the filling can separate from the edge of the tooth just a bit which would allow bacteria back into the tooth. To make matters worse, in this case the bacteria cannot be brushed away with a tooth brush because the gap is too small for one tooth brush bristle to get into. The bacteria can travel down this gap and create decay under the filling. As decay starts he gap gets bigger and allows more bacteria, which then causes more decay. The vicious cycle begins! The key to this is having regular check ups and cleanings with a dentist which will detect a filling that is leaking before the decay gets a chance to start growing. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does numbing last after a filling?

    Hello, Before the filling procedures starts the doctor will administer local anesthesia (local to the tooth being filled). The amount of time the anesthesia lasts relates to two different variables. First, there are several different types of anesthesia and they are used for different things. For example, most people refer to local anesthesia as novacaine. Novacaine is still around but does not get used nearly that much. In fact, Lidocaine gets used the majority of the time. Lidocaine usually wears off in about 1-2 hours from the time it was given. However, there are local anesthesia medications that will last up to 8 hours. The second factor to consider is the metabolism of the person receiving the local anesthesia. Sometimes people can metabolize anesthesia very quickly. Lidocaine which usually takes 1-2 hours can be metabolized and gone by someone inside of 20 minutes! So local anesthesia can be very personal as well. Fun fact: Did you ever wonder why it is spelt: cocaine? Yes, cocaine is and is used as a local anesthesia as well! Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How many times can a filling be replaced?

    Hello, How many times can a filling be replaced? The short answer is as many as needed or indefinitely. The issue with this response is that a lot of the time when a filling is replaced the filling gets bigger. Remember there is a reason the filling is being replaced and that reason is usually decay underneath of it. As the filling gets bigger the tooth gets less and less. At some point it is not helpful to do fillings anymore as the tooth has become more filling then tooth. At this point dentist start to consider a crown. A crown will hold everything together. Replacing fillings also has a lot to do with the size and location of the initial filling. If the filling started out as a small cavity and a small filling was done on the biting surface of the tooth, then the second filling can usually be very small as well. However, this is not usually the case. If the filling starts out large and it is located between the teeth down by the gum line then it may not be a simple filling anymore. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How many dental fillings can you get at a time?

    Hello, This is a great question! The answer of course depends on a few variables. First, how aggressive is the dentist doing the fillings. Some dentists do not want to do more then 1 or 2 at a time for various reasons of their own. Secondly, where are the fillings located. If there are 4-5 fillings all located on one side of the lower jaw then all of them can be done in one visit. In fact, it is sometimes recommended to be done in one visit because it saves time, trips to the dentist, and limits the amount of time local anesthesia has to be given (less injections). If the cavities are all over the persons mouth then it might be best for them to be done in multiple visits to avoid local anesthesia (numbing) a persons entire mouth. Finally, outside circumstances may suggest one way or the other. If someone is being deployed overseas then the government is going to want them to have all their fillings done at once. This maybe true if a person is going to study abroad for 6 months or more. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you survive the first week of braces?

    Hello, The best way to survive the first week of braces is to be well prepared and think about things before they happen. Eventually things will settle in and a new normal will get established. The first thing to plan for is the possibility of discomfort. Discomfort can come from a variety of sources when braces are used. The first source is after the wire is put on. This is a tightness that is felt of the teeth and after a day the teeth become sore. This can be handled with an over the counter medicine recommended by your doctor. Another common source of discomfort comes from the brackets that hold the wire. Talking and eating causes the lips to rub against these brackets causing soreness and irritation. As the irritation happens the area may swell a little bit which means it contacts the bracket even more. All this can be remedied by making sure to have some orthodontic wax (sold in pharmacies) on hand at all times. A little wax will smooth out the bracket and allow everything to heal. The second thing to plan for is eating. Remember that eating happens multiple times every day so it can be very frustrating. The best way to plan for meals is to thing about whether the meal will be at home or out. At home there are more resources to clean the braces after a meal (as well as a private bathroom). Secondly, think about what type of meals to eat. Shredded chicken or beef, or spaghetti would not be a good choice as it will wrap all around the wires and brackets. Finally it is good to know if the doctor plans put anything on your teeth to prevent them from coming together completely. This means that there will only be a couple of stops to chew on (making chewy meals difficult). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do loose teeth stay that way?

    Hello, It is beneficial to find out why the tooth is loose and how loose it is; however it is unfortunate but most loose teeth stay that way. Teeth usually get loose because the jaw bone around them has receded or the root itself has resorbed (wore away from the root tip down to the tooth) for one reason or another. If the tooth is loose because the bone around it has receded then it is likely that periodontal disease is the cause and it needs to be controlled before more teeth are lost. Also depending on the type of recession that has occured there are some techniques that might help brace the tooth or help the looseness. If the tooth is loose because of the root resorbing then replacement or bracing of the tooth are generally the only options. The good news about this is that periodontal disease may be absent. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do braces move your jaw back?

    Hello, No Braces do not usually move the jaw at all. Braces are usually used for moving the teeth within the jaw. When we are young and our jaws are still growing, the jaw bones are either encouraged to grow more or restricted from growing more with old head gear (yes this is still used). At the age of 26 the jaw is no longer growing so we can not encourage it or restrict it. In this can orthognathic surgery is used to change the size and shape of the jaw. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if teeth move too fast?

    Hello, This is a great question. Teeth naturally move based on the forces applied to them on a daily bases. These forces include lips, tongue, and any other oral habits (this is a whole other question). As the teeth sense this pressure the body activates cells to resorb (remove some of the bone) on the pressure side and add some new bone the other side. In order to move teeth too fast it would require more pressure. When high pressures are sensed, the body resorbs the bone faster and a larger hole is created. This is not done with the same precision because of the body's need to relieve the pressure. With reduced precision the accuracy of where the teeth move to is lost; which means the teeth are not being moved to where we want them to end up. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Are Emax veneers the best?

    Hello, In order to consider find out what the best veneer for a person is, the properties of the material should be considered. Emax is a porcelain and it has great aesthetics. However, if the person getting the veneers has a habit of grinding their teeth, emax veneers are more likely to chip which means they would have to be replaced. Zirconia is a stronger material and its aesthetics are good too but not as good as emax. As long as the aesthetics match and look good zirconia would be a better choice for someone whose teeth meet edge to edge and they grind their teeth. This would also give them more peace of mind as well. If these conditions do not exist then emax may be the best veneer for you. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is laser periodontal treatment effective?

    Hello, If there is a need for laser periodontal therapy it has been shown in a few small studies to be effective. This of course depends on the type of treatment that is being done with the laser. Lanap is a periodontal protocol that has shown to be antimicrobial. After treatment, significantly less bacteria associated with periodontal disease (periodontitis) are found on the gum tissues (gingiva). It is believed that this allows the tissues to regenerate. In order to know if this therapy is effective for any particular person prior to treatment, a sample of their bacteria would need to be taken. Other wise, starting treatment and seeing the results would be fine. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What can I do about my cracked tooth?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your cracked tooth. What can be done about a cracked tooth depends on how it is cracked and how it is bothering you. For example if it is only bothering you because you know about it then nothing may need to be done, but things can be done to notice it less. If it is a front tooth and it is chipped a little then there is not a lot you can do at home. This would require going to a dentist and having him/her/other aesthetically fix the chip. This could involve a bonding, veneer, or crown. If the crack goes into the center of the tooth (pulp chamber) then it is likely to be bothering you especially when you bite down and release. If this is the case then a root canal would be needed followed by any other treatment needed to fix the crack (crown, filling, core build up, etc). If it is cracked between the roots; unfortunately, most of the time this requires removal (extraction) and replacement of the tooth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • My gums hurt after my root canal?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your gum pain. There are three main reasons why gums (gingiva) would hurt after a root canal. The first reason is very simple. When doing the root canal the doctor probably used a rubber dam which is held on with a metal clamp. Depending on how low the doctor had to put the clamp on the gums could have gotten irritated. The second reason is if there was decay on the tooth close enough to the gums they could get irritated from the removal of the decay. Finally gum tissue can get irritated from the irrigation solution that is used. These are just usual cases. The best solution would be to go back to the doctor that did the root canal for an evaluation. There should be no cost for this as it is associated with the root canal. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How often do I need to get dental crowns replaced?

    Hello, Glad to hear you got the treatment you needed. Dental crowns should be replaced only when they truly need it. Crowns are not like tires on a car. They do not come with an expiration date and a good doctor will try to get a crown to last as long as possible. Sometimes this is 30+ years, sometimes 10 years, and sometimes 2 years. Crowns can fail for a variety of reasons. The worse reason is another cavity. Yes a cavity can develop around the edge of the crown and cause the crown to fail. At this point the crown needs to be removed as well as the decay underneath of it. Crowns can also have porcelain chip off. This depends on where the porcelain chips on the crown. If it is the biting surface of the crown it is possible to smooth it out and leave it. But if it is between the teeth this will leave a gap between the teeth which trap food. Constantly having food in this area will then cause the decay that was mentioned above. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • I recently read an article that said poor dental health could cause respiratory problems. Is it true?

    Hello, Poor dental health can lead to a number of health problems throughout the body. They usually stem from three areas. Firstly, the mouth is filled with so many different bacteria that all of them have not even been identified yet. If there is any bleeding in the mouth, these different types of bacteria can get into the blood stream and then go to other places in the body. Secondly, chronic (long lasting) problems in the mouth usually cause inflammation. When there is a chronic problem in the mouth, this inflammation is there the whole time as well. When the body is fighting off an infection (cavities are infections) the blood vessels get inflamed (swell up) and leak. This gets the immune cells to the area of the infection. If this is going on for a while immune cells will be in the blood stream in the rest of the body. Finally, some people start to have malnutrition due to dental problems. If someone constantly adjusts what they eat because of dental problem or perceived dental problem then their nutritional intake is going to be different. Brushing once a day and using mouthwash might be what is needed to maintain your oral hygiene, but it may not work for someone else. Additionally, there are things that brushing and mouthwash cannot get to. It would be best to see a dentist for an evaluation which will also evaluate your oral health and habits. Hope this helps. The best My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Are whitening toothpastes bad for the teeth?

    Hello, Whitening tooth pastes are like regular tooth pastes with the addition of some kind of peroxide in it. The peroxide is what whitens teeth and the regular tooth paste which has some type of fluoride in it (99% of them do) is what protects your teeth. However neither flouride nor peroxide is used protect the gums. The amount of peroxide in toothpaste has to be low enough to not harm the gums. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is teething delay in children normal?

    Hello, Good for you for being on top of your child's health. The first primary tooth (baby tooth) does not erupt into a child's mouth until 6-10 months. This range is completely normal. If you think about it, 6-10 months is a pretty big range which means that teething is not an exact science. So a child at 8.5 months is not behind at all. He could start teething in a couple weeks and his timing could just be that they are not going to come in until the end of the range. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • My nephew has one tooth erupting and he is just 1 month old. Is it normal?

    Hello, Normally teeth do not start erupting until age 6 to 10 months. However, sometimes children are born with a tooth or the tooth comes out shortly after the child is born. When a child is born with a tooth it is called a natal tooth. When a tooth comes out shortly after the child is born, it is a neonatal tooth. The teeth themselves are not normally a problem and are usually left in as long as possible. However, they can get in the way of nursing and it is best to make sure they do not cut the baby's lip or tongue. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does it take for permanent teeth to come after his primary teeth fall?

    Hello, The first primary teeth to fall out are usually the lower front two (mandibular central incisors, usually at the age of 6-7 years old). This is usually followed by the upper front two (maxillary central incisors). The reason primary teeth fall out is because the permanent tooth usually resorbs (removes) the root of the primary tooth as the permanent one erupts. This happens unless something else causes the primary tooth to come out like trauma. Once the primary tooth has fallen out due to the permanent tooth resorbing the root, it should take a couple of weeks to start seeing the permanent tooth. Remember the primary tooth falls out because there is not enough root to anchor it in; however, the permanent tooth still has to go through the gum tissues to be seen. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is a root canal safe for a 3 year old?

    Hello, Unless your daugther has any issues with medications or anesthesia, it should be safe for her to have a root canal. It may be called a root canal, but it is not exactly the same procedure as a root canal on permanent tooth (adult tooth). Primary teeth (baby teeth) are more susceptible to to the need for a "root canal" because the center of their tooth is a lot bigger then a permanent tooth. That means that a cavity that requires a filling in an adult may require a "root canal" in a child. The other thing to consider is the honesty of the doctor. A 3 year old needing a "root canal" is something that can ruin your day and exhaust you emotionally as it is not exactly fun for adults, let alone a 3 year old. So if the doctor is recommending it, then chances are they really believe it is needed. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a cavity spread to the next tooth?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about the cavity. Yes, it is possible for a cavity to spread to another tooth; however, different types of cavities may be more or less likely. If the cavity is between two teeth, then yes, the cavity normally affects both teeth. If fact, it is possible to be there already without know it. If the cavity is in the center of the tooth, then it is going to take a long time for this cavity to spread to another tooth (if at all). If taken care of early enough, the cavity wont spread into other teeth nor will it spread in the tooth that it is in either. Remember a cavity is an infection caused by bacteria. The bacteria will keep going until the tooth is crumbling. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Are there any home remedies to treat canker sores?

    Hello, The best way to treat canker sores is to keep them clean so they can heal. A canker sore is an ulcer by definition. An ulcer is a hole in the tissue whether it is in the gum tissue or the stomach tissue. The mouth is filled with bacteria which interrupts the healing process. Keeping the canker sore clean will make it heal faster. It will also minimize the discomfort in the mean time. The best way to keep it clean is to use warm salt water rinses. I have found that in a pinch mouthwash will burn but it will feel better afterward. I tend to do this before meals as it will numb out the pain while i eat. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What helps swollen gums from dentures?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your swollen gums. Swollen gums after getting dentures can be caused by a few different reasons; all with different answers. Therefore, it is important to figure out what is causing the swollen gums. The first thing to consider is whether you had any teeth extracted (removed) when you got the dentures. A lot of people get immediate dentures; which are dentures that are made to go in the day the teeth are extracted. If this is the case and also the area of the swollen gums then it is most likely the extraction of the teeth that is causing the swollen gums and not so much the denture. This is very common and the denture does not fit very well until the swelling goes down. Secondly, if teeth were not extracted at the same time the dentures were made it is helpful to realize that having the acrylic flanges (edges) of the denture is not something the gums are used to having near them and causing the swelling. If this is the case, then a simple adjustment of the denture to back the flange away from the gum tissue slightly usually alleviates the area and any sore spots that that may have developed. This can even happen when making a new set of dentures as it is highly likely to have very subtle differences in the way the dentures fit (think of it like a new pair of shoes - they could be the exact same shoes but your feet will still get sore). It would be best to go back to the doctor that made the dentures for an evaluation of what is causing the swelling. This is usually free of charge as it is considered in the treatment for making dentures. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the best material for dental crowns?

    Hello, What a great question to be asking. Unfortunately, the answer is not so simple. The best type of material depends on a few different factors; strength, location, aesthetics, and price (remember the most expensive crown someone will pay for is the one that person does NOT need). Crowns are typically thought of in 3 main categories; metal, porcelain, and zirconia. These three categories do have a good amount of overlap though. Crowns can be made out of full metal. These crowns have shown to be the longest lasting crowns due to the properties of metal match the tooth the best. In fact, it has been noted in the dental industry that the only downside to an all metal crown is its color (this is a huge problem if the metal is gold, it is a front tooth and the person does not want to look like a pirate). For a long time crowns were made out of porcelain laid on top of metal and was considered the gold standard. This was a good balance between the properties of metal and the aesthetics of the porcelain to make it look natural. The biggest issue with these crowns is that they can chip or the porcelain can come off and leave the metal color showing. At this point the crown would have to be replaced. To improve on aesthetics all ceramic (full porcelain) crowns were made especially for front teeth. These typically have the best aesthetics but there is a sacrifice in strength. If these break they typically need to be replaced as well. To improve on strength, zirconia crowns were made. These crowns are a ceramic crown but they have a very high strength. For a long time they were not very aesthetic as they were pure white. However, staining techniques have gotten really good and the aesthetics have improved greatly. So if you have a tooth in the back a zirconia crown is something to consider as it is made of one piece and does not chip (unless you do not mind the look of metal). If it is a short tooth zirconia may not stay in the best though. If it is a front tooth, there is an aesthetic zirconia that looks quite nice but is not as strong as the full strength zirconia. This is a lot of information and there is a lot more that can be said about the question, "which is the best crown". As a matter of fact, depending on the dentist, you will probably get different answers (for different reasons). All-in-all, if you trust any particular dentist to prepare a crown a particular tooth, then it would be best to ask that dentist about these different options and trust his/her opinion on which crown is the best for you. After all, the choice of material is the least thing to worry about. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is anesthesia needed for wisdom tooth removal?

    Hello, Good for you for getting the treatment you need. If you are referring to being put to sleep (known as general anesthesia) the short answer to your question is, No. This of course depends on which wisdom tooth and how it is arranged in the jaw bone. There are low in come clinics that take wisdom teeth out all the time without general anesthesia. However, if the tooth is impacted and facing the wrong way or it is deeply embedded in the jaw bone, general anesthesia and sometimes extraction in an operating room is recommended. It is best to talk this over with the surgeon who is going to extract the wisdom tooth prior to the day of extraction. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is pericoronitis a serious condition?

    Hello, Pericoronitis is an infection associated with a partial erupted tooth. Usually the teeth that are most prone to this are lower wisdom teeth as they rarely erupt fully and straight. Since they are not in fully and straight this changes the shape of the gums. Food particles or plaque gets caught around the tooth and usually does not come out with a tooth brush. This food sits there and causes the infection known as pericoronitis. More often then not, the first symptom is discomfort which is followed by swelling. At this point it is something that should be cleaned out by a professional and if needed an antibiotic. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you know if your wisdom teeth are infected?

    Hello, Wisdom teeth can be infected in a few different ways; each of which has its own ways of detecting. The first way is through a cavity. A cavity is technically an infection and when small can require an x-ray (radiograph) for detection. Sometimes it can get bigger and you can see a hole in the tooth which will tell you there is a cavity. Secondly, a wisdom tooth can get an infection at the tip of its roots. This is an abscess and sometimes symptoms can help but it usually requires an x-ray for complete detection.. Finally, wisdom teeth an get an infection known as pericoronitis. This an infection that is associated with a partially erupted tooth. Just like the other infections it can happen to any tooth; however, wisdom teeth are more common due to the lack of space in the jaw which causes the partial eruption. Since pericoronitis is usually caused by food particles or plaque getting stuck under the gums detection is usually done by symptoms and experience. A x-ray will be negative for the other types of infection. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is a crown necessary after a root canal?

    Hello, While a lot of times crowns and root canals do go hand-in-hand, it is best to think of root canals and crowns separately. For example, what is the reason I need a root canal and what is the reason that I need a crown. On a back tooth, the rule of thumb is that if a tooth is getting a root canal the best way to protect the tooth is by putting a crown on it. The logic here is simple. Back (posterior) teeth are used for chewing. Front (anterior) teeth are used for biting into things. This means that our back teeth get used much more often then our front teeth. The back teeth are also much more broad and flat then front teeth. After a root canal the hole in the center of the tooth gets filling up. It is usually best to hold everything together by putting a crown on top of the tooth. As far as front teeth, the rule of thumb is quite the opposite. Since a front tooth is not used as much and the surface is smaller, it does not need a crown after a root canal. If the tooth is still intact then it might be better to leave it without a crown because the aesthetics will better match the rest of the front teeth. Or it can improve the aesthetics by doing a crown after the root canal if it was badly broken down. So as 2 of the 3 situations described recommend a crown after a root canal it is very common; however, it is not always needed. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do I know if my tooth abscess is spreading?

    Hello, A tooth abscess is an infection which is always changing. The abscess part is the the battle ground between the infection and the immune system fighting it. The abscess will try to keep expanding until it reaches a drainage area. The drainage area can be from the gum around the tooth, from gum up by the end of the root, or into the facial tissues (this causes the face to swell up). To know if it is spreading without seeing any of these signs would require some type of imaging; such as, an x-ray. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it normal for your tooth to hurt after a filling?

    Hello, A tooth may hurt after a filling for a few different reasons. This is only normal for fillings that we would expect it. It is certainly not uncommon as well. Things that would make a tooth hurt after a filling is the size and location of the filling, the type of material used for the filling, and procedure that was used during the filling. The size and location of the cavity matters because if it was close to the center of the tooth (pulp chamber where the nerve is) this could cause sensitivity. This means that in the area of the filling there is not as much insulation around the tooth. If this is the reason it could be just sensitivity and take some time to dissipate or it could mean a root canal is needed. The type of material used is important because some of the materials are associated with more sensitivity after a filling. For example, tooth colored fillings have been shown to have more sensitivity after a filling then the old silver ones (one of the reasons silver fillings are still around). Finally, the procedure used can cause some post-filling sensitivity. If a lot of air was needed to keep the area dry during the procedure, it could have irritated the nerve inside a little. This will usually resolve itself. If it is still painful after 2 weeks, a visit back to the doctor that did the filling is best. This should not have any additional fee as it is associated with the filling. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a tooth infection affect your whole body?

    Hello, While it does not happen all the time; yes, ANY infection can affect your whole body. An infection signals the body's immune system to be active. This means that the body's blood vessels swell up an start leaking to get immune cells in the area of the the infection. The immune cells are now active and travel throughout your body. Chronic (long standing) inflammation starts to affect other organs as well as affect illnesses such as diabetes. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How many hours a day do you wear dentures?

    Hello, There is no real set amount of time to wear dentures for everyone. However, it is recommended that the dentures are taking out for sleeping. If a person gets 8 hours of sleep the dentures will be out for 8 hours and the gum tissues will have 8 hours of time without a denture sitting on them. This is mainly done to prevent a fungal infection which dentures make gum tissues prone to. Usually this 8 hours is enough for most people; however, if problems start to arise this time can be adjusted by taking them out an hour before bed. Now they will get 9 hours. They can also be adjusted the other way as well; especially if a night-out is on the calendar. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does a crown require a root canal?

    Hello, No a crown does not require a root canal. The reasons for needing a crown maybe related but they are separate. If a tooth needs a crown that generally means that it is broken down in such a way that it can not be restored into a tooth without the need for a crown. Now this can be related to a root canal if the tooth is broken down in a way that it can not be restored into a tooth without a crown and the way in which it is broken down involves the center (pulp chamber) of the tooth. This would mean that the tooth has a major flaw and can not be rebuilt without causing damage to the nerve inside the pulp chamber. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do I need to see a dentist for pericoronitis?

    Hello, Percoronitis is an infection that is associated with a partially erupted tooth. Due to the lack of room in the jaw more often then not, this is the 3rd molars (wisdom teeth). It would be in your best interest to see a dentist regarding pericoronitis. Usually this infection is because food particles or a build up of plaque got stuck underneath the gums around the tooth. The dentist will be able to give you anesthesia which will get rid of the discomfort and enable the dentist to clean out the gums around the tooth. The dentist can also prescribe an antibiotic if needed. All of this makes the recovery from pericoronitis much quicker and easier. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a CT scan show a dental abscess where a bitewing X-ray would not?

    Hello, Hope your sinus are doing better! There are a couple of interesting areas about your question that are worth mentioning. First off, no bitewing X-rays do not show the root tips of teeth which is where an abscess is most likely to show up. So it would be very rare to see an abscess on a bitewing X-ray. A peri-apical (peri meaning around, and apical meaning apex or root tip) is the type of x-ray that is generally used to see if there is an abscess. Secondly, if tooth #15 had a previous root canal then it is highly likely to have what we refer to as apical scaring (just like in any other area of the body, when there is a large cut, a scar can form). There was a reason that the root canal was done the first time. That reason could have easily because #15 had an abscess. When there is a an abscess associated with a tooth, a lot of the times the bone around the abscess does not heal all the way. There is nothing wrong here, it can stay like that for the rest of time but it will continue to look like there is an abscess there. As a matter of fact, is a peri-apical x-ray (PA) is taken of tooth #15 it would probably show that there is a dark spot there as if the abscess did not heal all the way. When a CT scan is done it shows areas that are voids and the maxillary sinuses sit very close to #15. Scar tissue is not as dense as jaw bone so the scar will look like an abscess on #15. Finally, there are two things to consider whether there is a re-infection of #15 or if it is just scar tissue. The first is to look at any previous peri-apical x-rays and compare them to a recent one. If the dark area has not changed or gotten bigger it is most likely scar tissue and not an active abscess. The second consideration is where there are symptoms associated with #15. If there are no symptoms associated with #15 then it is most likely scar tissue that was seen in the CT scan. Hope this help. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if you get a cavity with braces?

    Hello, Yes, you can still get a cavity while wearing braces. In fact, because teeth are harder to brush and floss with braces on, cavities are more likely to happen during this time. If you get a cavity while having braces it is going to depend on where the cavity is. If the cavity is between the teeth then the orthodontic wire (wire for the braces) will have to be taken off, then fill the cavity, then the wire for the braces goes back on. If the cavity is on a different surface of the tooth it is possible to fill the cavity without having to remove the orthodontic wire. Hope this helps! My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you get braces if you need fillings?

    Hello, Yes you can get braces if you need fillings; however, the fillings are usually done before the braces are put on. Fillings are a lot easier done without braces and it is usually best to make sure the teeth are in good health before putting braces on. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you put braces on just a few teeth?

    Hello, Generally speaking we want to straighten all the teeth that could benefit from being straighter if we are going through the process of putting braces on. However, if the person only wishes to have their front teeth straightened and the conditions allow for that; Yes only the front teeth will get braces. Conditions have to allow for few reasons. First of all sometimes in order to move the front teeth around, the back teeth need to be moved in order to make space. Secondly, depending on the particular movements of the front teeth, the back teeth might need be used as anchors during the process. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you get a cavity under a crown?

    Hello, Yes, it is still possible to get a cavity after having a crown placed. The most common area to get a cavity after getting a crown is at the interface where the crown meets the tooth. The crown is made of a material (metal, porcelain, zirconia, etc.) which does not get decay. However, the area of the tooth right next to the crown is still susceptible to decay and cavities. This is usually where a cavity starts. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a dental crown be put back on?

    Hello, Depending on the reason why the crown came out; yes, the crown can be put back in. Sometimes a crown will come out because the cement was old and gave way. If this is the case a reputable dentist will inspect for any decay under the crown, take an x-ray, clean the crown, check the fit, and re-cement the crown back in. However, sometimes a crown will come about because a cavity that formed around the edge got big enough that the crown could no longer hold on. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Will dental crowns fall out?

    Hello, Yes dental crowns can fall out. Crowns can fall out for a variety of reasons. If the crown has been in for a while then the usual reason why it comes out is because of the cement failing. This normally means that the crown just needs to be cleaned and re-cemented. The other common reason for a crown falling out after a period of time is a new cavity that has formed which loosens the crown. However, regular check ups and cleanings at a dentist usually limit the possibility of a crown falling out by identifying particular issues before they happen. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is a root canal necessary before a bridge?

    Hello, A root canal is necessary for a variety of reasons. The best way to know if a root canal is needed is by the reasoning behind why the root canal is needed. This just means it is best to separate and understand why the bridge is needed and why the root canal is needed. The bridge is most likely needed because of the missing tooth and probably another reason or two. The question is why is the root canal needed? There could be a cavity in one of the teeth that support the bridge. If the cavity is big enough or too close to the pulp chamber (center of the tooth) then it is important to do the root canal prior to the bridge. Another reason that the tooth would need a root canal is because the tooth has broken down and in order to build it back up a post needs to be put in. In this case a root canal would need to be done. The important thing to keep in mind here is that there reason for why a tooth needs a root canal and understand that reason separate from the need to have a bridge. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I drink through a straw with braces?

    Hello, As long as you are able to close your lips around the braces without any discomfort and have not had an extractions (tooth removal) in conjunction with your braces, you should be fine to drink through a straw. The brackets and wires on the front of someones teeth can cause sores or feel like their lips are being stretched. They make orthodontic wax to put on the braces to prevent this. Also sometimes people need to have teeth removed in order to make room for all the rest of the teeth. The teeth are usually extracted before the braces are put on, but dry socket is always a condition to consider when teeth are removed. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I use mouthwash with Invisalign?

    Hello, If you are referring to using mouthwash while the invisalign aligners are still in, then no. Invisalign only recommends that you drink room temp to cool water with the aligners in. The reason for this is because different chemicals can distort or degrade them. Seeing as they move teeth based on the their shape, distorting of aligners is something we want to avoid. Also different temperatures can distort them as well. Regarding the use of mouthwash while invisalign aligners are not in, yes. In this case, it would be beneficial to use the mouthwash, then rinse with water to get any of the mouthwash that can stain off. At this point the anti-microbial benefit has been long received. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long do stitches stay in after dental bone graft?

    Hello, Although it can vary depending on the person doing the bone graft, type of stitches used, and type of bone graft being done, stitches (sutures) are usually put in for 7-10 days after a bone graft. Remember stitches are used to hold the gum tissues (gingiva) together until the gum tissues heal. Once the gum tissues heal, there is nothing left for the stitches to do. The bone graft will take a few months to heal but the gum tissues have already healed over top of it. Again this could vary depending one what is being done. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does swelling last after dental bone graft?

    Hello, Swelling after a bone graft can vary widely depending on the type of bone graft being done, the person doing the bone graft, and whether or not it is being done at the same time as a tooth extraction. Sometimes there is no swelling at all with a bone graft. This is normally the case when the graft being done is "socket preservation". This is a bone graft done after a tooth extraction. This means placing bone graft material into the socket where the tooth came out and it is done to preserve as much bone around the tooth as possible. If there is any swelling with this type of bone graft it is not from the bone graft; it is from the extraction of the tooth. Sometimes it is not as simple as "socket preserving" bone graft. Sometimes other grafts need to be done where bone graft is added onto the jaw bone for one reason or another. Sometimes the jaw bone is not wide enough and the best way to get the right width is to divide the bone and widen it. This is known as "ridge split". These procedures are more invasive than the simple "socket preservation" and are more likely to have swelling afterward. Regardless, if swelling does occur the peak onset is 4 days. That is to say the swelling will start and continue until 4 days and then start going away. Most of the time it is gone long before this though. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does an overbite need to be corrected?

    Hello, No an overbite does not need to be corrected all the time. Overbite refers to how much the front teeth overlap each other vertically (from top to bottom). Overjet refers to how much front teeth overlap each other in a horizontal direction (from front to back). Most people say over bite, but they are referring to their overjet. Regardless of what it is called the most common reason for correcting overbite or overjet is aesthetics. Most patients are motivated to correct overbite or overjet because they want their teeth and smile to look better. This is not the only reason, but it is the most common. Other reasons would involve damage. Some people have so much overlap (overbite) that their front teeth are contacting their gums and causing damage when they chew. If you are still considering braces or invisalign; good for you. Correcting an overbite or overjet will make a smile look great (careful you might start seeing other things you do not like) and it will help out dentally as well. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does it take to fix an overbite?

    Hello, The amount of time it takes to fix an overbite depends on a few factors; the persons age, whether it is overbite or overjet, and how severe the overbite or overjet is. First of all, when we are younger our jaw bones are much more accommodating to tooth movement. Our teeth move easier which means the process is quicker. As we get older it will take longer to move teeth. However, as we get older we do not need to worry about our bones changing as much and moving our teeth. Secondly, overbite is the amount of overlap of the from teeth vertically (from top to bottom). For example, a person whose top front teeth cover all of their lower front teeth has more overbite then a person whose upper front teeth cover only half of their lower front teeth. Overjet refers to the amount of overlap in a horizontal direction (front to back). For example, if someone's front upper teeth are way out in front of their lower front teeth, they have a lot of overjet. This makes a difference because the correction of overbite and overjet is very different and someone with only a slight overbite can be corrected in a matter of months. Finally the severity of overbite or overjet can change things a lot. Overbite is usually limited. Once the teeth overlap so much that they are contacted the gum tissues this is generally as severe as it gets. Even in this case correcting just the overbite should not take that long and once half of it has been corrected a significant improvement has been made. A severe amount of overjet can require the extraction (removal) of teeth, jaw surgery, and then braces which can take up to 2.5 years. So a slight amount of overbite correction in someone in their early 20s would take a short amount of time. This is contrast to someone with a lot of overjet correction in someone in their mid teens or over 35 would take a lot more time. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Which is better floss or floss picks?

    Hello, Good for you for being concerned with flossing. While there are pros and cons to floss vs. floss picks; if, it makes the difference between flossing and not flossing, which one you prefer would be better. The pros to flossing the regular way is that you have more material to work with. This means that you are not taking bacteria from between two teeth and spreading it around between all your teeth. This may not make that much of a difference in most people, but in that one rare person it would make a big difference. The second pro to using regular floss is that it is much cleaner on the environment (if that is something you are concerned with). For each person that uses a plastic floss pick once a day for a week, that is 7 pieces of plastic in the garbage a week (364 a year) for two minutes worth of work. These are natural cons for the floss picks. The pros for floss picks are that they are; easier to use on the go, they do not require as much dexterity (in the beginning), and some might find them quicker. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can they put you to sleep for dental implants?

    Hello, This is a very good question. The simple answer is that you can be put to sleep for just about any dental procedure. This does not mean that it is a good idea or that you can find someone to put you to sleep for any dental procedure. There are a few factors to take into account while considering to be put to sleep for a dental procedure. First thing is a persons anxiety. How anxious is the patient and can it be alleviated another way. Conscious sedation has become popular as an alternative to being put to sleep. The Second thing to consider is how invasive is the dental procedure. Extracting (removing) wisdom teeth is an evasive procedure and most people like to have that done with no recollection of it at all. When an implant is put in there is a very low expectation of pain during or after the procedure. Most people are very surprised by this. However, when an implant is coupled with the extraction of a tooth (to save time) this is an area where the procedure can be invasive and have some discomfort afterward. If this is the case, it would be best to talk to the doctor doing the procedure about the options available. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you take care of your mouth after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, There are 3 things to consider when considering the best way to take care of your mouth after a tooth extraction (removal). The first thing is cleanliness. The cleaner your mouth is the better and faster it will heal. This means using warm salt water rinses at the appropriate times as well as keeping the extraction area free of food particles after a meal. The second thing to consider is to be on the preventative for dry socket (alveolar osteitis). After a tooth is extracted, the socket that the tooth sat in forms a blood clot. The lost of this blood clot is a dry socket which can be painful. Because of this it is best not do do any rinsing, spitting, drinking through a straw, or dragging on a cigarette for the first 24-48 hours after tooth extraction. Finally, the 3rd thing to consider is something that most people tend to forget: exercise. This means that you should use your jaw to chew and eat as you normally would. Do not over work your jaw but it is also important not to abandon it either. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How can I make my teeth move faster with braces?

    Hello, Congratulations on getting straighter teeth. However, there is not a lot that can be done to straighten teeth faster. Unfortunately, studies have shown that in order to speed up the movement of teeth, heavier forces need to be applied and when these heavier forces are applied, the jaw bone does not react in a favorable way. It makes the movement of the teeth less predictable and less retentive when it comes time to wear a retainer. When people get a new wire put on their teeth can feel sore and are often told to take ibuprofen (motrin, advil, etc.) for the soreness. While this works for the soreness it is only recommended for a few days because ibuprofen slows down the tooth movement. So if you can handle the soreness when a new wire is put on you can prevent the slowing down but not taking ibuprofen. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can wisdom teeth cause your gums to swell?

    Hello, Yes, wisdom teeth can cause your gums to become inflamed and swell. This happens often, but it is a usually an issue caused by the impacted nature of the wisdom teeth in the gum tissue. The impacted gum tissue allows food particles to get stuck there which will caused gums to be inflamed and a lot of discomfort. The good news is removal of the wisdom tooth will usually correct the situation. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a tooth infection cause facial swelling?

    Hello, Tooth infections do often cause facial swelling. The reason for this is because the bacteria from a tooth cause the immune system to react. This is a battle between that usually occurs at the root tip of the tooth. Part of the immune response to the infection (bacteria) is a process called edema. This means that the blood vessels that lead to the area swell up and leak fluid into the area. The process allows immune cells to get to the area. However, it means that a lot of fluid builds up in the area causing the facial swelling (since the roots of teeth are located in the face). At this point an antibiotic is normally needed to fight the infection. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long do you have to wear braces after your teeth are straight?

    Hello, What a good question to be asking. When you get braces, your teeth become straight but that does not mean they will stay that way. It is helpful to first take a look at why teeth get crooked in the first place. Teeth balance the forces of lips and tongue. So once your teeth are straight, they will still have forces pushing them in different directions every day. This usually means that retention (wearing a retainer) is for life. The retainer would only have to be worn part of the time (at night mostly) to help keep the teeth in position from the forces they endure each day but the retainer will usually be needed for as long as you want your teeth to be straight. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • At what age do adults need to consider dentures?

    Hello, Good for you for being proactive! However, age is not something that should play a big role in the consideration for dentures. For example, I have seen patients in their 90s that have all their teeth. I have also seen patients as young as 22 and 23 that were considering dentures. As long as the majority of teeth are healthy, then there is no need to consider dentures. The consideration of dentures is better suited when there are several teeth missing which affects effect chewing, or periodontal disease (gum recession) or badly decayed teeth require the removal (extraction) of several teeth. At this point there are other options to consider as well; such as implants or bridges. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can braces make teeth become loose?

    Hello, Good for you for interest in straightening your teeth. It helps in so many ways! Regarding your question about braces making your teeth loose; Yes, they make your teeth loose. This is how moving and shifting teeth around work. First the teeth have to become loose so they can be moved. However, are you are asking about whether your teeth will become loose after your braces? There is the possibility (although rare) that a root on one of your teeth resorbs (wear away from the tip of the root down) while the braces are moving your teeth. If this continues, it is possible to have nice straight teeth; but the tooth with the resorbed root will feel loose. The result is normally just the feeling of a loose tooth. Interestingly enough, this does not usually happen with invisalign. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What do I do if my retainer doesn't fit anymore?

    Hello, If your retainer does not fit anymore, it is helpful to figure out why. If it does not fit because it has not been worn in some time, then it means that your teeth have shifted. If it has been consistently worn, then there may be something wrong with the retainer. Regardless of the reason, it would be best to go back to the person who make the retainer for you in the first place as that doctor can properly evaluate whether your teeth have shifted and if there are any destructive interferences (teeth are hitting each other improperly). If this is not an option, you can usually go to a dentist for a free consultation and discuss the different types of retainers that can be made for you. Hope this helps My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it ok to not wear a retainer for 2 days?

    Hello, Ideally it is best to wear your retainer each night or as the doctor who made it advised. However, there are plenty of times where people go away for the weekend and forget to bring their retainer. The first thing to do is to try your retainer back in. Usually there is not too much movement of teeth in 2 days. If the retainer goes in fully, then there is no worry. The retainer may fit a little tight at first but this usually goes away over time. If the retainer does not go in, then it would be best to see the doctor who made the retainer for you. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a root canal being done change your face shape?

    Hello, Good for you to be concerned with aesthetics. No, a root canal will not change your face shape. It is helpful to know what is happening during a root canal to be confident that it will not change someone's face shape. A root canal is usually needed for one of a few different reasons (decay into the nerve, bacteria into the nerve, unable to restore the tooth without being to close to the nerve). Regardless of why the root canal is being done, the treatment is usually the same. The center of the tooth (the canal) is cleaned out (removal of decay, bacteria, nerve and blood vessels). The canal is then reshaped and then filled. The action of the root canal does not change the way the outside of the tooth looks, let alone someone's face shape. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does a typical crown last?

    Hello, The goal of the any good dentist is to get the crown to last as long as possible. I have seen some crowns that have been in place for over 30 years and they are still working great. However, crowns can fail for a variety of reasons (breaking, more decay, or just not aesthetic anymore). Insurance companies will usually pay their portion to replace a crown every 5 or 10 years. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can facial massages help ease tooth pain?

    Hello, What a delightfully interesting question. It is a normal characteristic of people to rub something that is causing them pain. For example, when someone bumps their arm they tend to rub it with the other hand for a couple of minutes. The reason for called the pressure-gate theory; which is a fantasy name for a theory that says that when it comes to pressure and pain signals, pressure will get through to the brain before pain does. If we apply the pressure-gate theory to the facial massage question the answer is yes, facial massages will help ease tooth pain. As a matter of fact the first thing someone does when they have tooth pain is to put their hand over the tooth that is bothering them and subconsciously start rubbing it. This means that the pain signal going to the brain will get interrupted in favor of the pressure signal, easing the pain. It is important to know that the pressure-gate theory does not eliminate the pain because it does not get rid of the source of the pain. It only eases the brains interpretation of pain. It is recommended that a facial massage only be done to relieve pain while getting the cause of the pain treated. Hope this helps My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD Deluxe Dental Group www.warrensbestdentist.com READ MORE

  • Is it normal for wisdom teeth to come in at 17?

    Hello, Yes, this is normal for your son's wisdom teeth to come in around the age 17 as this is about the time they are expected to try to come in. This is also why we try to have them removed at this time. They are easiest to remove at this point as they are less impacted and their roots are just starting to develop. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if food gets in your wisdom tooth hole?

    Hello, If food gets into the hole from where your wisdom tooth was it is not usually a big deal. It is best to squirt some water back there to try and flush it out. Do not pick at it as this could cause dry socket. The food will usually come out rather easily. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do wisdom teeth get cavities easily?

    Hello, It is not easier for a wisdom tooth to get cavities. The reason it seems like wisdom teeth get cavities is because of their location. Wisdom teeth are in the back of your mouth which means they are harder to clean. They are the area that gets the least tooth brush time and they are difficult to floss. It is also important to note that they are even difficult for the dentist/hygienist to clean as well. Now add the fact that they are most likely on an unusual angle which traps food between your teeth allowing cavities to develop. This means usually means that the wisdom tooth will get a cavity as well as the tooth in front of the wisdom tooth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What are the disadvantages of braces?

    Hello, Braces are a time-honored tradition but they do come with a few disadvantages. First They are always on your teeth and only a dentist is supposed to take them off. This is a disadvantage in a few different ways. The brackets and wires will catch all the food that is ate. This means that special trips to the bathroom to clean the braces after each meal are required (shredded meats are a lot of fun). It is also more likely that food will get missed and will eventually cause a cavity. Flossing is much more difficult. Usually a floss threader is needed to get the floss around the wire to get between the teeth. Since the wires are not easily taken off by the patient if one of the wires pops loose, it usually starts poking the cheek which requires a visit to back to the dentist. Secondly, the brackets that are put onto the teeth are usually metal and bulky. Lips and cheeks get very irritated from this and eventually some orthodontic wax (can be bought at any pharmacy) is needed. Lastly, one of the thing most unknown disadvantages is called, "root resorption". This means that the root of any one of the teeth (usually front teeth) being moved can start disappearing from the root tip down to the tooth itself. This is a phenomenon that is not understood completely but it tends to happen more with braces then clear tray aligners. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long after a filling can I eat?

    Hello, You should be able to eat as soon as the anesthesia (numbness) wears off. A filling should be completed by the time you leave the dental office; however, you will most likely still be numb; you can eat then, it will just be difficult due to possible drooling and even worse biting your lip or cheek. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if a broken tooth goes untreated?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your broken tooth. There are a few things that will probably happen over time, depending on the nature of break. One, the tooth may get a cavity or infection. If it is a small break this is unlikely to happen; at least not for a little while. However, if it is a large break it can happen rather soon. When a tooth breaks it usually loses its enamel covering. The layers under the enamel are porous and allow bacteria to get inside a lot easier. This could mean that instead of fixing your tooth with a simple filling, it requires a root canal and crown, or even the loss of the tooth and an implant (the treatment gets more involved and much more expensive). Second, the tooth opposing the broken one will start to enter the space of the broken one. This will not be a problem and go unnoticed until you try to restore the broken one. At this point you would have to have work on both the opposing tooth and the broken tooth to make everything fit. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does a periodontal treatment take?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your periodontitis. How long treatment takes usually depends on what kind of treatment you are having done. The first step with treating periodontitis (periodontal disease) is having scaling and root planning done. This means usually has to be done in two visits (one side of the mouth one day and the other side of the mouth another day). Local anesthesia is given during this procedure. Each appoint lasts about an hour. A follow up visit is usually recommended for a few weeks from then another cleaning a few months after the scaling and root planning. This is all part of the process to arrest (stop) the periodontitis. If it has been determined that some type of surgical procedure is needed, the appointment generally lasts about an hour for each area that is needed. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How to treat a mouth burn in a child?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your son's mouth burn. Fortunately, most burns in the mouth do not need treatment as they are small local areas and they heal on their own. Even though the mouth is full of bacteria, the burn is on the inside which means it is protected and has the same environment for the most part. The best thing to help the burn heal is try to keep the area clean. Now, this of course depends on how old your son is. If he is young, he may not have learned the ability to swish and spit yet. He may also the taste of warm salt water as this is one of the best ways to keep it clean. Regardless, slight burns heal on their own and only become a problem if they drag on without any change for the better after two weeks. Hope this helps. My best to you and your son! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is Invisalign more permanent than braces?

    Hello, Good for you for wanting straighter teeth. Invisalign is usually less permanent then braces, but it is helpful to compare the two. Braces requires brackets (the metal squares) that get bonded to the teeth (in the front most of the time). After this a wire gets put into these brackets and tied down. This wire is supposed to only be taken in and out at the dental office and change of the wire means pulling on the teeth more. Invisalign requires clear aligners (trays) that get put onto the teeth. Invisalign does recommend that the aligners be worn 22 hours a day, but the aligners are able to come in and out by the patient. These means you can take them out to eat. Invisalign most of the time requires attachments put onto the front of the teeth. These attachments (bonding bumps) are much smaller then the brackets required in braces and also match the color of the tooth. These attachments are bonded to your teeth much like the brackets so they do not come off except when the dentist takes them off. Because of the small size of the attachments and ability to take out the clear aligners, invisalign is less permanent and less invasive then braces. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if a dry socket is left untreated?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your dry socket. Are you sure it is dry socket and not something else like an infection? Dry socket occurs after the extraction of a tooth. When the tooth is removed the socket that the tooth sits in fills with blood and forms a clot. This clot is unstable and gets disrupted by things like drinking through a straw, dragging on a cigarette, and spiting. Once that blood clot comes out an empty socket is left behind which can be very painful. When dry socket occurs the only treatment that doctors can give is palliative treatment (treatment for the symptoms). The doctor can pack the socket with dry socket paste which gets rid of the pain but is awful in taste. So if you are not having pain or other symptoms that bother you and it really is dry socket then leaving it untreated is fine. It heals on its own. If it is an infection then leaving it can be bad, and you should have a professional look at it. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I sleep on my side after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your need for an extraction. As long as the symptoms do not keep you awake; yes, you can sleep on your side after a tooth extraction. There are some things you want to consider first. Make sure the anesthesia has worn off before you go to sleep. You do not want to wake up in pain because the anesthesia wore off while you were sleeping. Secondly, make sure you do not have any bleeding. When you leave the office you will be biting on gauze to help for a clot. If you fall asleep and you have bleeding you may wake up with blood in your mouth or coughing. Finally, if you sleep on the side only you may feel some throbbing, which means you will have to switch sides. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do they fix a cavity?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your cavity. Cavities come in all different shapes, sizes, and locations. Provided this is a cavity that absolutely needs a filling (it is not too small where it can be reversed, and it is not to big where bigger treatment is needed) most dentists will start by giving local anesthesia (getting the patient "numb"). The cavity is a tiny hole, at the end of which there is bacteria and a pocket of decay. Once the anesthesia takes effect the dentist will drill where the cavity starts and follow it where the decay and bacteria go. At this point he/she will remove the decay and bacteria and make sure there is nothing but good, clean, hard tooth structure there. Finally the dentist will put in the filling (most likely tooth color that matches the tooth). After the filling is in the dentist will make sure it is smooth, polish it, and make sure all your teeth come together nicely. The treatment options are limited though. First off, the filling does not have to be done. The dentist is only making a recommendation that you should have it done. If it is small and the tooth structure is still there, then theoretically it can be reversed by keeping it clean (brushing and flossing) and incorporating fluoride. There are options as far as filling materials; tooth colored vs silver (yes some dentists still do silver). Unfortunately, other then this, the only other options are more invasive procedures such as crowns or veneers. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you stop a cavity from getting worse?

    Hello, Are you sure what you have is a cavity or could it be some staining? This is a hard judgment for dental students to make as they are learning to diagnose cavities. If it is a cavity, it is a bacteria infection. The only way to stop it is to remove the bacteria or get them to stop. This is normally what a dentist does while he/she is removing a cavity as you cannot stop the bacteria without cleaning out the tooth. In a pinch I would say fluoride rinses and step up the brushing and flossing game, but this is not a permanent solution. I would also say to get a free consultation or second opinion as these are normally free where I practice. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do I stop getting canker sores?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about all your canker sores. I too get a lot of canker sores. Unfortunately, science has not figured out what causes canker sores yet. Since it is not known what causes them, it is difficult to treat them. However, the current believe is that there is some kind of trauma. This not only means be careful when you eat but also what you eat. Look into the foods you eat and look for acidic foods, then try to eliminate them from your diet. Acidic foods are hard on your mouth and can be causing trauma to your gum tissues. Canker sores can also come out in times of stress as well. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long do dental crowns last?

    Hello, Good for you for getting the treatment you need. The goal of any good dentist is to get a crown to last as long as possible. They usually brag about how they have had a crown last 30 years. This is certainly the exception but it is not unobtainable. Insurance companies will usually pay to replace a crown every 5-10 years depending on the plan and company. Crowns can fail in a couple different ways. First, depending what the crown is made out of, the porcelain can chip off. While this is not an immediate problem it can cause a gap between your teeth which traps food. While this is annoying it also usually causes a cavity below the crown. Secondly, crowns fail because of a cavity. Crowns cover the tooth and the crown itself does not decay; however, there is always an edge where the crown meets the tooth, and this is where a cavity can form. If either of these happen, you usually need to replace the crown. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it necessary to have wisdom teeth removed?

    Hello, Great question! I deal with this question all the time. Just because they are not causing pain does not mean they are not causing a problem. Wisdom teeth can be impacted (even when they are fully erupted, most of the time they still have a slight impaction on the gums or tooth in front of it). There are pros and cons to having your wisdom teeth removed. The cons of having wisdom teeth extracted are that general anesthesia (being put to sleep) may be required and having soreness and limited opening for a while after the extractions. The pros to having wisdom teeth extracted are numerous; the biggest one is that you do not have to worry about them for the rest of your life. Like it was stated earlier, most of the time wisdom teeth are impacted. This means they create cavities between the teeth. Often times when this happens the tooth in front of the wisdom tooth needs to be extracted as well. Secondly, the impaction on the gums means that food can get inside your gums and wont come out with a toothbrush or floss. This is a very painful condition called pericoronitis, and the dentist has to clean out that area. Third, wisdom teeth are in the back and very difficult for people to keep clean. Since they are not getting cleaned as much, they tend to get cavities sooner which means you will have to either get a filling on them (harder when they are in the back) or have it extracted later in life. Age 28 is usually around the latest that oral surgeons want to extract wisdom teeth because of the flexibility of the jaw bone. Obviously they will remove a wisdom tooth after age 28 but only if they have to and it is usually a more difficult recovery. So if you are 27 and you live to the age of 97, that is 70 more years of possible problems! Hope this helps My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does swelling last after dental implants?

    Hello, Glad to hear you are getting the restoration you need. There are two main ways to place a dental implant: the first involves taking the tooth out and putting the implant in on the same day. The second way is to take the tooth out and put the implant in a minimum of 3 months later. Swelling and discomfort associated with getting dental implants usually is because the first method is done to save time (tooth extraction and dental implant in the same day). Any swelling or discomfort you have is due to the extraction of the tooth. Swelling is not usually associated with a dental implant. You may have some very minor gum swelling after having the dental implant placed but nothing big enough for you to notice to easily. If using the second method to place the dental implant (remove the tooth and place the implant a few months later), people are generally surprised at how easy the dental implant procedure goes. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How painful is a dental implant?

    Hello, It is good that you have interest in your health care. However, dental implants are not usually painful. Discomfort and swelling that maybe associated with getting dental implants is usually because the dental implant was put in the same day as the tooth was extracted. It is the extraction that may have discomfort or swelling, not the dental implant. In a way, this is good news; if you have had an extraction and that does not bother you, then you know the addition of a dental implant will not bother you. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How can I make my dental implant heal faster?

    Hello, Glad to hear you are getting the treatment you need. There is a variety of things that are happening when a dental implant is "healing." First, the gums have to heal and this usually happens in a few weeks. Secondly, The jaw bone needs to heal up around the dental implant. The implant is made out of a titanium alloy so that way it is as kind to the human body as possible. The bone cells in the the jaw integrate with the surface of the implant in order to hold it in place. This is a very slow process that takes at least 3 months. Then, about when a bone is broken. A cast is placed on for several weeks to stabilize the bone while it heals. After the cast comes off, the bone is still healing, but now it is stable on its own. Dental implants do not get a splint to stabilize them and they experience immediate force as soon as they get made into teeth (remember there is a lot of force on your teeth and you use them every time you eat). In fact, only about 60% of the implants surface gets integrated ("healed") into the jaw bone. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I exercise after dental implant surgery?

    Hello, Good for you for being so health conscious. Yes, you can exercise after having an implant placed (with certain precautions of course). If you are having general anesthesia (being put the sleep) for one reason or another, you may feel tired during the rest of the day. If you are having the extraction at the same time you might want to forego the exercise for a day or two to make sure you don't have any throbbing or bleeding. It is best to talk to the doctor about the exercise as only they know exactly what is being done for your implant. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Will a dry socket heal itself?

    Hello, I hope you do not have dry socket. Yes, dry socket will heal itself if everything else is normal. Dry socket (alveolar osteitis) happens after a tooth is extracted. Once the tooth is removed, the socket the tooth was sitting in fills with blood and forms a clot (just like any other wound). This clot is what protects the jaw bone while the healing process begins. If that clot comes out for one reason or another (drinking through a straw, dragging on a cigarette, spitting), the jaw bone is exposed and has nothing protecting it during the healing process. This will usually get covered up in about 3 weeks and the symptoms of dry socket usually will go away in about 2 weeks (provided there is not else happening like uncontrolled diabetes which delays healing). The symptoms of dry socket can vary a lot. It can be painful at times and the only thing that can be done is put a dressing in the socket which will help the pain but tastes very gross. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What are the first signs of dry socket?

    Hello, Dry socket (alveolar Osteitis) can have a variety of symptoms. Some people may get it and never know they have it, especially if it comes on late. The most common initial symptoms associated with dry socket are swelling of the area, redness with patches of white around the area, and discomfort. However, these can also be symptoms of the extraction of the tooth, which is why it is good to have a doctor look at it (if you have had a tooth extracted by a doctor, the follow-up visit should not comes with an extra bill). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you remove hard plaque from your teeth?

    Hello, Plaque that is hardened to your teeth can not be removed with a toothbrush or flossing. It needs to be scraped off or at the dental office they use a machine that vibrates very fast (35,000 to 60,000 times per second). This is what is usually happening when you hear that scraping noise. I don't think there is any home use type of stuff on the market, plus you can cause damages to your gums and teeth. Hardened plaque an also look just like the tooth so some can be missed. One of the most common areas to get this build-up is on the inside of your lower front teeth, which is almost impossible to see on yourself. You might want to go to a dentist for a free consult or a free second opinion (most reputable places do these for free). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can ultrasonic cleaning damage teeth?

    Hello, Yes and no. The short-sided answer to an ultrasonic cleaning causing damage to your teeth is yes. However, the practical answer is no. It takes a lot of work and almost an intent to damage the enamel on teeth with an ultrasonic cleaner. The plaque and calculus (hardened plaque) will be come off long before healthy enamel gets damaged. However, it is much more easily to damage gums with an ultrasonic cleaner. This normally only occurs during a deep cleaning when the gums are inflamed. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can scaling damage your teeth?

    Hello, This is a great question to ask. Although it is possible for scaling to damage teeth during a scaling it is highly unlikely. Scaling is done to remove hardened plaque (calculus) and diseased tooth structure from the teeth. While doing this it is possible that a tiny chip of the enamel or root structure can come off especially if it was compromised to begin with. However, if it is not compromised beforehand, then in order to cause damage during a scaling, you almost have to be trying to damage the teeth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How are teeth extracted?

    Hello, This is an interesting question for you to ask; good for you! Of course, this all depends on which tooth is being extracted, why it is being extracted and how old the person is. However, the general idea is to get the area numb with local anesthesia (this happens even if they put you to sleep for the procedure). Then you separate the gum from the tooth (yes they are attached a little bit). Then you have to expand the socket that the tooth sits in. This is done with a variety of instruments and wiggling of the tooth. Most of the time people think the doctor is struggling getting the tooth out; he/she, is just wiggling the tooth to expand the socket so the tooth can slip out. Sometimes teeth with more than one root is cut so that way each piece only has one root to allow it to slide out easier. Hope this helps. Good luck with your extraction. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the best painkiller for a tooth extraction?

    Hello, The best painkiller for a tooth extraction is highly dependent on the person having the extraction. Remember different people have different perception of pain (aka high or low pain tolerance). Some people also have medication restrictions; for example ibuprofen irritates their stomach, or interferes with another medication they are taking. Keeping this is mind the doctor will usually advise some over-the-counter drug like ibuprofen (advil and motrin are the same thing) to be taken regularly for few days. The biggest part about pain management is staying ahead of the pain, not waiting until you feel pain and then try to knock it down. If this regimen does not work for you the doctor may prescribe tylenol #3, vicodin, or percocet (usually in this order) to reduce the pain down to a level manageable with ibuprofen. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What age should a child start having dental cleanings?

    Hello, It is good to see you are thinking about your daughter's dental health care. For most people, it is an after thought. Usually, you want to do the first dental visit around the age of 1. By this time the child will have most of their primary (baby teeth) in. This is good because the child starts to get to know the dentist at a young age and gets to have positive visits when not to invasive procedures need to be performed. Do not worry that your daughter is 4 years old. You are not behind yet, but you do want to start considering getting her to have her first visit soon. Hope this helps. My best to you and your daughter! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why does a tooth need a root canal?

    Hello, Good for you for wanting to understand why a procedure is needed! There are indeed a few reasons why a tooth needs a root canal. First, let's start with the one that may not be so obvious, but makes sense when thought about. A tooth that has chronic (long lasting) severe pain. The nerve that sends pain signal back to the brain is located on the inside of the tooth and is protected by the tooth. If there is something that has compromised this protection the nerve inside the tooth is exposed. Most commonly, this is usually a cavity that has gotten to that nerve. At this point, the tooth usually needs a root canal for two reasons; 1) the nerve is damaged and needs to be removed (root canal), 2) putting a filling in that tooth will cause the the nerve more damage which means a root canal. Secondly, sometimes a tooth can require a root canal in order to make it a functional tooth. This means that if your tooth has been worn down from grinding, fillings coming out, or the tooth breaking there is not enough tooth left to build up. In this case, in order to build up the tooth a post is put into the tooth to hold the build up in. In order to put a post in the middle of the tooth (where the nerve is) the nerve needs to be removed, which means a root canal needs to be performed. This is referred to as a root canal for restorative purposes. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How can I strengthen my enamel?

    Hello, Great question and good for you for being on top of dental health! Enamel can only be strengthened by having stronger components in its make up. By stronger enamel it is really meant that it resists cavities and erosion. In order to resist cavities, we have to know what causes them. A cavity in the enamel of a tooth is caused by acid (enamel erodes). Teeth come into contact with acid from acidic foods/drinks, bacteria, acid reflux (stomach acid). Bacteria play a role because they take the sugars that we eat and produce lactic acid. This acid then produces a cavity. Enamel is made up of the minerals calcium and phosphate. During the times of acid production, the calcium and phosphate minerals leak out of your teeth. When the the acid goes away, they go back in. I know it has gotten some negative attention lately, but replacing calcium with fluoride makes the enamel much more resistant to the acid. Fluoride forms a much stronger bond. So, adding fluoride into your enamel is what makes it stronger. One of the simple ways to add fluoride into the enamel is by using a fluoride mouth rinse sold in most supermarkets. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long should a filling hurt?

    Hello, A filling should not hurt at all; but, that depends on what is meant by hurting. It also depends on the size and shape of the filling. A filling that is down right pain full should be examined by a doctor cause even for doctors it is hard to pin down what is going on. This should not cost anything extra as well. If the tooth is sensitive after the filling, it should be known that sensitivity is a common side effect of a filling, especially a tooth colored filling. The sensitivity usually comes and goes but it can last up to 6 weeks, with most fading around 2 weeks. The size and shape of the filling matters as well. A filling that is large or has a part that gets close to the center of the tooth is more likely to be sensitive or irritate the nerve inside the tooth. Believe it or not, the amount of pain felt on the tooth is a good indicator to simple sensitivity issue or something bigger. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a tooth that had a root canal get infected?

    Hello, Yes, a tooth that has had a root canal can get infected. A root canal removes all the stuff on the inside of the tooth (blood vessels, nerve, and bacteria). During this procedure, an antiseptic is used to kill off any bacteria or organic matter. At the end of the procedure a filling material is put into each one of the canals to seal it off. After the root canal is done, it is common to put in what is called a "core build up." This is to seal off the top part of the tooth. After this, a tooth can get infected in two main ways: 1) one of these seals fails and bacteria gets inside the tooth. Eventually, the immune system will recognize this infection and start fighting (losing the battle). This will usually cause an abscess, pain or both. 2) a bacterial cell inside one of the canals can become active. Usually, bacterial cells are killed; however, getting all of them is next to impossible (even Listerine can only kill 99.9%). These cells form spores and lay dormant for decades. Sometimes they can re-activate. The other way a root canal tooth can get re-infected is by a cavity. You can still get a cavity in a tooth that has a root canal. This will only get noticed by going to regular appointments for check-ups. This is because after the root canal, there is no nerve left in the tooth so you should not feel pain from a cavity. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do dentures cause dry sockets?

    Hello, Dry socket occurs after removal (extraction) of a tooth. After extracting a tooth, the socket that it sits in fills with blood and forms a clot. The loss of this clot leaves the socket exposed which can be painful. This is known as dry socket. So, unless you had a denture (or an immediate denture) and then had a tooth extracted, the denture can not cause dry socket. If you did have a tooth extracted and a denture put in right after, it is highly unlikely that the denture would cause the socket to lose its clot. This may occur if you put denture adhesive on the denture and then take it out pulling out the clot. After about 2 weeks, the tooth socket is mostly closed dry socket does not generally occur. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What can you eat when you have toothache?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your toothache. What you can eat when you have a toothache really depends on when the tooth bothers you. If it bothers you only when you chew on it, then eating chewy foods or hard foods are going to cause more pain. It would be better to stick to soft foods and if need be avoid eating on that tooth. If it bothers you all the the time then it may not matter what you eat as it does not usually bother you more to chew on it. You may be able to eat on it or have to avoid it depending on how painful it is. You can get a free consultation at a dentist to find out what, if anything is wrong with the tooth. At that point, you would have a better understanding of what would ease your pain and the right things to eat. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long after a tooth extraction can I eat on that side?

    Hello, You should be able to eat on that side later that day. You will leave the office biting on gauze for a half hour to develop a strong clot. This clot is there to protect the area while the healing process takes over. You do not want to eat anything that will disrupt the clot. You will be able to eat on that side; however, you want to avoid hot foods as that can cause more bleeding; hard foods will cause irritation and possible clot disruption, and spicy foods can irritate it and cause a burning feeling. As you can see it is more important about what you eat instead of when you eat. It is also important to do what you can to prevent losing that blood clot. This usually entails not drinking from a straw, spitting, or dragging on a cigarette. All these things cause changes of pressure in your mouth which can cause you to lose the blood clot. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do they break your jaw for surgery?

    Hello, Good for you for choosing to have your jaw corrected (orthognathic surgery)! This is not an easy surgery to recover from, but the results are usually great. There are a few different types of orthognathic surgery, but most of the time a drill is used to cut your jaw rather than try to break it in the way that is needed. No one is going to wack your jaw while you are asleep if that is what you are wondering. For the upper jaw it is simply just cut with a drill. For the lower jaw, it is cut with a drill and then split. These are the ways that the jaw is broken in the two make types of orthognathic surgery. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long should a crown hurt?

    Hello, Glad to hear you are getting the treatment you need. Aside from a few complications to having a crown procedure, the crown itself should not hurt at all. Remember there is a reason you are getting a crown and that is usually that there is a missing part of your tooth. This missing part can be from a cavity or from a fracture of your tooth. If it is from a cavity the question then becomes where is the cavity and how big is it. If it is big or close to the pulp chamber (center of the tooth) then you may have sensitivity after getting the crown. This sensitivity is because while removing the cavity the blood vessels in the tooth got inflamed. This may or may not go away. If it is because your tooth has fractured then this is unlikely to happen. If a crown continues to hurt after it is in place, then it is important to see the doctor that did the crown to properly assess why there is pain there. Sometimes it could be as simple as making an adjustment to the crown (you should not incur any additional cost for this either). Think about it, what would be a reason for putting a crown on the tooth if it is going to be painful. The point of doing the crown is to continue to make tooth usable and it would not be usable if it hurts to use. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you get dentures to stay in place?

    Hello, Sorry to hear that you are having a hard time getting your dentures to stay in place. Dentures can be a bit tricky and they do not always work out nicely for everyone. First off it is important to distinguish between a partial denture (one that clips onto the remaining teeth) or complete denture (there are no more teeth in that jaw and it rests on your gums/jaw. Complete dentures are more difficult to stay in place because they do not have any teeth to prevent certain movements; such as sliding and rotating. Second thing to consider is if it is the upper or lower denture that is having a problem. A complete upper denture stays in place by its extension onto the gums between your lip and jaw bone. If this part of the denture is too long or too short it will cause the denture to move. The upper denture also forms a seal on the palate which helps keep the denture in place. If this seal is broken the denture will tend to fall down. A lower denture does not have this ability as your tongue is the the way so lower dentures tend to move around a lot. Finally, it very important to know how much of your jaw bone has been lost. Yes when a tooth is lost the body does not need to support a tooth in that area so the jaw bone resorbs (shrinks) over time. This means there is less for the denture to grab onto. If you put all of these together in one jaw, it will be very difficult for a denture to stay in place. Now that we know what would cause a denture to move around, we can do some things to help. First, you can try using a denture adhesive; such as, fixodent or polygrip. A lot of people get a lot of help from this. Sometimes people can get a reline procedure which re-contours the inside of the denture. Aside from this you can get a free consultation with a dentist to evaluate your current denture and what can be done to make it stay in place better (sometimes this could mean implants). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I brush with toothpaste after a crown was placed?

    Hello, Yes, you can brush your dental crown with toothpaste after it has been placed. More than likely the outside of your dental crown is going to be made up of some kind of porcelain or zirconia, unless you are having a full metal crown being made. It is been widely studied that a porcelain crown is about times more abrasive than a metal crown. This is one of the concerns when placing a crown on someone who has a grinding (bruxing) habit. The toothpaste does have abrasives in it, but they are no where near as abrasive as the crown is. In fact, I have a patient who has two crowns (one in the upper teeth and one in the lower teeth) opposing each other. He has been chewing on them for 30 years before he wore through the porcelain. Chewing happens much more frequently than brushing, requires much more force, and has more abrasive materials than the toothpaste and it still took 30 years. Hope this helps and hope your crown lasts a long time. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Are dental implants a long-term solution?

    Hello, Yes, dental implants are a good long-term solution. It may vary from person to person a little bit, but dental implants are considered to be the longest lasting replacement to natural teeth right now. Dental implants have a success rate in the high 90s if placed by a specialist. You do still have to worry about periodontal disease (periodontitis or receding gums), but since implants are made up of titanium (sometimes a titanium alloy) and porcelain, you do not have to worry about getting cavities in a dental implant. This means that if you are prone to cavities, it may be a good solution for you. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Should I still have pain 3 days after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about the pain you are having. It is not usual, but it is also not uncommon to have pain 3 days after a tooth extraction. Do you have any swelling? The peak onset for swelling after an extraction is 4 days. Usually when people have swelling after an extraction the pain is because the swelling is stretching everything out. That pain will fade as the swelling fades. The second common reason for pain 3 days after an extraction is dry socket. After you have a tooth extracted, the socket that the tooth sits in fills with blood and forms a clot. The loss of this clot is known as dry socket. It is a very painful condition that can last up to 2 weeks. The best thing for you to do is get evaluated by the doctor who extracted your tooth (which should be no additional cost as it is covered under the extraction). If you do not feel comfortable you can get a second opinion which are most often free. Hope this helps and your pain subsides. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does the numbness last after tooth extraction?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about the loss of your teeth. During the extraction of your 3 three the doctor will give you some local anesthesia which is what causes the numbness. The amount of time the numbness lasts depends on what local anesthesia the doctor decides to give to you, when it is administered, and your individual metabolism. There are several different local anesthesia and they all tend to vary in the amount of time they last. Also, some of them come with epinephrine in them which will make it last a little longer. Keeping this in mind one of the more common local anesthesia is lidocaine with epinephrine. This one usually lasts for about 1.5 to 2 hours from the last time the doctor gives it.If the doctor has to stop and give more half way through the extractions than that will add on to the 1.5 to 2 hours. However, this is for the average person. Some people will have a metabolism that speeds this up. I have seen some people metabolize and lose the effect of this local anesthesia in as little as 20 minutes! For this person it is a good news bad news situation. This would mean the patient would need more local anesthesia every 20 minutes (3 times if the procedure is an hour), but it also means that person will not be numb as long after the procedure. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why are root canals so painful?

    Hello, Sorry to hear you need a root canal but I am glad you are getting the treatment you need. If you ask enough people you will start to notice that half of them tell you that root canals are very painful and the other half of the people will tell you that they had no pain at all during their root canal and their dentist is the best. The reason for the difference is because not all teeth need root canals for the same reason. Some teeth need root canals because the nerve inside of the tooth has started to die and become necrotic for one reason or another (trauma from a few years ago, cavity that got to the nerve, etc.). People with teeth in this type of situation is usually will have sensitivity or pain (but sometimes no pain if it was over the course of a couple years). If this person goes in for a root canal the nerve, which is what sends the pain signal to the brain, is already dead. This means that when the doctor goes inside the tooth they are cleaning out the nerve that is no longer sending pain signals to the brain. The doctor is literally cleaning it up and filling up the canal. These people will tell you that they never had any pain with their root canal. If we contrast this situation with a tooth that needs a root canal because a cavity is too close to the nerve that we cannot fix it without bothering the nerve, but too far away from the nerve to cause any problems with the nerve. This means that the dentist doing the root canal is going to enter the center of the tooth and take out a nerve that is alive and still has the ability to send pain signals back to the brain. People that have gone through this situation will usually tell you root canals hurt. Finally, you can also add in the idea of perception. If people believe that the root canal will hurt (from their friends telling them it will) will be on the look out for pain and perceive it more painful. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does an extracted tooth bleed?

    Hello, After a tooth is extracted, the doctor will usually have the person bite on a piece of gauze for about 30 minutes to make sure there is no more bleeding. Usually at this point there is no bleeding at all. However, the socket from where the tooth was is in a fragile state and certain things can cause it to start bleeding again. Eating or drinking hot foods will give it a tendency to make it bleed more. Disrupting the blood clot in the socket can make it bleed again or it could leave you with dry socket. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How painful is having a tooth removed?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your loss of a tooth. You will be given local anesthetic (numbing agent) so you should not feel any pain while you are having your tooth removed (extracted). You will however, feel pressure as the doctor is wiggling your tooth around. The pressure sensation will always be there. Afterward, you will be sore any may have some swelling in that area. Your doctor will give you something for the soreness and tell you to stay on top of it. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is Invisalign worth the money?

    Hello, Invisalign can be costly, even to dentist it is costly. However, it does have a lot of pros to Invisalign. First off, you can take the aligners out of the whenever you eat. This means that you have less things on your teeth to catch food and hold it between your teeth. It also means that you clean your teeth between meals which keeps the food out of your teeth and have lesser chance of getting cavities by the time you are done. Secondly, they are generally really quick. People get treatment times of 6 months or less sometimes. This is 6 months of having aligners on your teeth that people only notice if they are looking for them. Additionally, you are supposed to wear the aligners for 22 hours a day which means you tend to snack less due to not wanting to have to take your aligners out all the time. This could be a pro for some people. Finally, with traditional braces, the risk for root resorption (where the root of your tooth wears away from under the gum without you knowing it) is a lot higher than with Invisalign. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Which dental crown material is best?

    Hello, This is a very good question for you to ask. Dental crowns are usually made out of metal, porcelain, metal and porcelain, or zirconia. These crowns all have different properties and have been developed to improve upon the previous crown choices. Starting with an all metal crown, most studies have been shown that all metal crowns last the longest and that only major con is that they are metal color and not tooth color. They do not wear the opposing tooth as much as porcelain or zirconia would. Next, there was the idea of adding porcelain onto the metal so you get the properties of metal and the aesthetics of the crown matching the color of the teeth all around it. The combination of this is great and this type of crown has been the number one go to crown choice for a very long time. However, it does have some draw backs because the the porcelain is prone to chip and fracture off of the metal leaving gaps between teeth and unsightly metal parts. Moving on, it was thought that if we could just make it out of all porcelain we would not have to worry about the crowns chipping. All porcelain crowns have a variety of types just in this one category and depending on which tooth needs a crown, the doctor may select one over another. This is the category that emax crowns fit into. They tend to have great aesthetics but the strength is lower. Finally, we have zirconia which has excellent strength and really good aesthetics. Zirconia was difficult for a while because it tends to be opaque white which can look just as fake as a metal crown. Thanks to recent staining techniques it is now a great looking crown with great properties. As you can see, the best crown material may vary depending on what you value more. If you value the longest lasting crown and it is a tooth in the back, you may want to consider an all metal crown. If you want something strong and aesthetic, you may want to consider a zirconia crown. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does it take to get dentures after teeth are pulled?

    Hello, After extracting (removing) teeth, the jaw bone and gum tissues change shape and size because they are no longer supporting a tooth. This process takes several weeks to finish and because of it there are two different approaches to plan for a denture after an extraction. The first approach is straight forward. Extract the teeth that are being replaced and wait a few weeks for the shape change in the gums to happen. Then you start the denture making process. This way is usually better if only the back teeth are being replaced as the person has to walk around without teeth for several weeks. The second approach is to start making the denture before the teeth are extracted and have it ready for the day they are extracted. This is called an immediate denture as you are putting the denture in immediately after the teeth are extracted. This is usually preferred when front teeth are being removed so that way the person is not walking around for several weeks without front teeth. The cons to having an immediate denture is that it does not usually fit when in the beginning because of swelling from the extractions (even more so with more teeth being extracted) as well as having to make another dentures a few months down the road because the shape change of the gums and jaw bone causes the denture not to fit anymore. Aside from this, it will take several weeks just to make a denture between try-ins and shipping back and forth to the lab. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • At what age do gums start to recede?

    Hello, Although they usually show an age pattern, because of the different reasons for gum recession, gums can start to recede at any age. Gums can recede on some teeth because of an improper bite. This just means that your teeth are not aligned one hundred percent and some teeth are taking more force than the rest of them. This can happen at any age (commonly during early 20s and later in life) as teeth constantly shift throughout life. Interestingly, when the gums recede due to this, the cure is to align or adjust the teeth to reduce the force. Secondly, gums can recede from toothbrush abrasion. This means that the person tends to be heavy handed with their tooth brush and wears away their soft tissues and can happen at any age. Finally, the main reason we worry about gum recession is because of gum disease, periodontitis (periodontal disease). This is a process started with bacteria and ending with inflammation in the gum tissues and recession. This process can happen anytime, but it is most commonly seen in people's 30s and 40s. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a receding gum line be reversed?

    Hello, Unfortunately, receding gums cannot be reversed in a natural sense. Gums can recede for a couple of different reasons (periodontal disease, toothbrush abrasion, etc.), but there is a lot more going on than the gums just working their way down the tooth surface. As this happens, the jaw bone below the gums are receding as well and the root surface of the tooth is becoming exposed. This is a biological process that can only be stopped and prevented in the future but not reversed. However, this does not mean gum tissues are stuck like that. Gum grafts have been widely successful to improve aesthetics. Gum grafts will adhere to existing gums and cover the tooth which will also protect from sensitivity. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What should I do after dental implant surgery?

    Hello, Glad to hear you are getting the treatment you need. Dental implant surgery can be done in a variety of ways depending on what is needed. If it is something as simple as just the implant needs to be put in, then it is a very simple and quick procedure where you will not even know it happened, and for the most part resume your life normally after the procedure. Sometimes a sinus lift, bone graft, or tooth extraction needs to be done at the same time. If this is the case your doctor will give you specific instructions (depending on which one of these procedures is also being performed) to prevent any complications. Usually, it will be diet restrictions like nothing too hot or spicy as hot foods will promote bleeding and spicy foods will irritate the area. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is ultrasonic scaling painful?

    Hello, Glad to hear you are taking care of your oral hygiene. An ordinary routine dental cleaning with an ultrasonic scaler is not usually painful at all. You can have an area or two that may be a little sensitive, but it should not be painful. However, if you are having a "deep cleaning" (what we call "scaling") and we suspect it can be painful anesthesia will be given in those areas. This is usually because the gums are swollen and sensitive. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do oral cysts go away?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your oral cyst. Unfortunately, they do not go away on their own. They need to be removed by an oral surgeon. Oral cysts are formed like cysts of any part of your body. They come from embryonic cells (cells that get left behind when you are a developing embryo). Because these cells are from when you are developing they tend to divide and grow nicely. This complicates things a little because it means the cyst can reoccur after removal. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if tooth decay is left untreated?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your tooth decay. It is not a good idea to leave tooth decay untreated because if there is one thing we know about tooth decay; it will keep growing. Eventually, the decay will get large enough that it will get close to the nerve (pulp chamber) inside the tooth which will cause sensitivity in that tooth. If it continues to be untreated the tooth will need a root canal because of the bacteria causing inflammation inside the tooth and irritating the nerve. If the decay gets large enough, it could mean that there is not enough tooth left to be saved and will need to be removed (extracted). Also, remember that if the decay is between two teeth (as a good amount of cavities are from inadequate flossing), then this process can be happening to two teeth instead of just one. Usually, simple fillings can prevent this process. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can dentures fall out?

    Hello, Congratulations on the grandkids. Rarely do dentures fall out of someone's mouth, but upper dentures can fall down. At this point the person would notice that they fell down and would close their mouth so they don't fall out. This is something that may or may not go unnoticed by your grandkids. Fortunately there is something you can do about it. This is why denture adhesives like polygrip and fixadent are available. If you still have trouble with your dentures after this you can talk to a doctor about having implants placed that will hold the denture in its place. These consultations with the doctor are usually free. So there are some options for you. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if a cavity is too deep?

    Hello, Cavities tend to get bigger as the bacteria gets further and further into the tooth. Unfortunately, when they get to close to the center of the tooth (the pulp chamber where the nerve is) a root canal needs to be done because there is no way to get the bacteria and decay out of the tooth with out causing inflammation of the blood vessels and irritation of the nerve inside the tooth. This is usually what is going on already by the time you feel pain or sensitivity in your tooth. It is also to keep in mind that location plays a role in the cavity as well. If the cavity is in the biting surface of the tooth (occlusal), then it can get pretty big before it causes a problem. If the cavity is down on the gum line and between the roots it can cause a problem before it gets too deep. It could even mean the need to remove the tooth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can an oral surgeon help with TMJ?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your clicking and tension. Yes, an oral surgeon can help you with your TMJ problems (known as TMD). Since you already have symptoms, an oral surgeon can help identify what is causing those symptoms: arthritic changes in your joint, dysfunction of the joint itself, your structure of the joint. The oral surgeon can also help by discussing treatment options and the likelihood of each one helping with your symptoms. Remember, not all oral surgeons treat TMD, so it is a good idea to ask before going in. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is Sensodyne Pronamel good for sensitive teeth?

    Hello, Yes, Sensodyne Pronamel is good for sensitive teeth. A lot of people with sensitive teeth have benefited from Sensodyne toothpaste, but not just Sensodyne toothpaste. Most toothpastes have some type of fluoride in them (most commonly stannous fluoride or sodium fluoride). Sensodyne advertises that stannous fluoride goes deeper into the enamel to help protect against cavities and seal off the tooth. Sensodyne also has potassium nitrate in their toothpaste. Potassium nitrate is a "desensitizing agent." It has a soothing effect on the nerve inside the tooth. That being said, people with sensitive teeth generally find that one sensitive toothpaste will work better than the rest for them. My wife personally prefers Colgate sensitive toot paste over Sensodyne for her sensitive teeth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can brushing help painful gums?

    Hello, Hope your gums feel better soon. The answer to your question is not so straight forward. However, it could have a simple answer. Brushing can only help your gums if lack of brushing is what is causing your painful and irritated gums. Are your gums painful all over your mouth or just in one area? If they are spread throughout your mouth, then it could be a lack of brushing causing your painful gums or it could be an illness that your body has (not so common). How often do you brush your teeth now? If you brush a couple times a day, then it is less likely that your brushing your teeth is going to help your painful gums. If you have missed a few brushing sessions then it is possible to have plaque build up and inflammation in your gums and this can make them irritated and painful. First thing you can do is make sure you brush twice a day and floss once per day, then see if you notice a difference after a few days. It will take longer than this to heal, but you will have a good idea in a few days. If not, then you you should see a doctor to rule out any potential illness. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you stop enamel erosion?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your enamel erosion. The best way to stop erosion of your enamel is to eliminate the source of erosion. Erosion is usually caused by an acidic environment over time. The tricky part to this is to identify what is causing the acidic environment. This can come from foods (tomato based products, etc) and drinks. Sodas have been long known to "erode your teeth" and they do it in two ways. First, sodas are packed with sugar which helps the bacteria in your mouth products lactic acid. Secondly, sodas are often acidic in themselves. So, you have an acidic drink that helps produce more acid. This can really affect your teeth over time. Another food that people do not realize affects your teeth is sports drinks. Some studies have shown that drinking sports drinks can lower the pH level in your mouth down to 2 (which is the same acidic level of your stomach). Finally, your bacteria play a significant role in producing acid in your mouth you want to make sure you are on top of brushing and flossing to keep these bacteria at a minimum. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the best toothpaste to restore enamel?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your need to restore enamel. If you look at the ingredients of tooth pastes you will probably get confused. However, you do not need to look very far to see what you need to know. Most toothpastes contain a fluoride (there are a few different types of fluoride with subtle differences). You will also notice that they generally state the same percent fluoride. This is because it is the maximum they can put in by law. If needed, a dentist can prescribe a high dose fluoride tooth paste that has 5 times the amount of over-the-counter toothpaste. The fluoride in toothpaste is only helpful if your enamel is intact. Your enamel has a crystal lattice form that is packed with minerals. The idea to restore your enamel means to refill the form with minerals and fluoride. Once the form is gone, you cannot restore enamel. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can front teeth get dental crowns?

    Hello, Yes, front teeth can and do get crowns all the time. The reason why it is not done as much as back teeth because we use our back teeth much more as they are the teeth designed for chewing. Our front teeth are designed for biting into things like sandwiches and apples. After we bite into the food, we chew it with our back teeth. Also, we have the ability to use a fork and knife unlike most in the animal kingdom so there are meals we have that we do not bite into anything. As all this is true, there are reasons why we put crowns on front teeth and not all of them are functional reasons. Almost all traumatic accidents to the teeth involve the front teeth. Teeth that are significantly broken usually get restored with crowns (think about hockey players). Sometimes people do not like the color, shape, or gaps between their front teeth, so they elect to change them by putting crowns on their front teeth. It is a good way to get a great smile rather quickly. Sometimes crowns on front teeth are a better idea than veneers due to the ability of a veneer to fall off under the patients bite. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD Deluxe Dental Group www.warrensbestdentist.com READ MORE

  • Can dentures have their color customized?

    Hello, It is always nice when people have a strong interest in the way their dental care looks. Yes, denture teeth come in different colors and even if the most white teeth are not white enough for you, you can usually get something made with ridiculously white teeth. I think you are referring to the teeth on the dentures being really white. If not, the acrylic the denture is made out of usually has different pigments in it to make it more or less pink to match the type of gums a person has. You can make this white as well. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Are you put to sleep for dental implant surgery?

    Hello, Usually, you are only put to sleep (given general anesthesia) if there is a reason to put you to sleep for most dental procedures. Having an implant put in is usually not a reason by itself to put someone to sleep. The reason for this is because with local anesthesia, there is usually no pain or discomfort. Most of the time the patient is completely unaware of what is happening during the procedure. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you relax your jaw with TMJ?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your TMJ problems (known as temporomandibular disorders, or TMD). The best thing to do is to find out what is causing your TMD. Are you in pain? Does your law lock up? Or do you feel the muscles around your jaw are spasming? This is important because if your jaw tends to lock up on you, it is not normally because of the muscles or because it needs to be relaxed. It is usually because the parts of your TMJ get rearranged in a manner that does not allow your jaw to open or close. It is not until these parts get put back in their correct order that your jaw will then open or close. However, In order to relax your jaw, you have to relax the muscles that you chew with. There are a few of them, so you would have to find out which muscle is having a spasm and try to massage it to relax it. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is a small hole in a tooth a cavity?

    Hello, Glad to see you are concerned about your dental care. By definition a hole is a cavity. However, that does not necessarily mean that it is what we refer to as "a cavity" in dentistry. If the hole you notice has been there as long as you can remember, it may just be a unique formation of the tooth that is perfectly intact tooth structure. That being said, if it is new it could either be a broken part of the tooth or an actual cavity. Small cavities are actually hard to define for even trained professionals and occasionally there is some disagreement. If you are unsure, why don't you get a free consultation from a dentist or a couple of dentists? Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Are all holes in teeth cavities?

    Hello, Not all holes in teeth are cavities. Some holes are supposed to be there, some are cavities (most common), and some are fractured teeth. It is important to know how long the hole has been there. Is it something that you just noticed or has it been there as long as you can remember? If you just noticed, what changed to cause you to notice it? Did you eat something that when into a hole and stained it? What area of the tooth is it on? The biting surface of the tooth generally has pits in it naturally. Those are very tiny holes that a toothbrush bristle cannot get into to clean. So, if you ate something like chocolate, those pits will have a dark color to them making it look more like a small hole. That being said, there are plenty of times where a hole is a cavity. Bacteria get into the enamel through a microscopic hole and they cause a hole underneath the enamel. Then one day, the enamel on top will break away cause it has nothing supporting it and you will see a hole. It is sometimes hard for professionals to decided if it is a cavity or not. You can get a couple free consultations and then make a decision. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you get a filling without an injection?

    Hello, It depends on the size and location of the filling as well as the type of person you are, but yes it is possible to do a filling without an injection. Sometimes fillings are only in the enamel so you don't expose the layer underneath and therefore there will be no discomfort. In these times, we usually recommend to go without the injection unless the person is very fearful of dental pain. These people would rather the injection knowing that there is little chance they would feel the dental pain even without it. Other people fear the injection much more than any perceived dental pain. These people are not as common as the previous type, but some will have you do crowns without any injections. It is important to note that these people don't usually even flinch while the work is being done. Finally, the size of the filling is important to know. If it is a small filling then the total amount of time to clean out the cavity could be as little as 30 seconds. At this point you present to the person that it is the possibility of sensitivity for 30 seconds or an injection and the numbness for an hour and a half afterward. Some will chose the injection and some will chose the possible sensitivity for 30 seconds. You can always get a free second opinion and ask the doctor before you go in to have the filling done. Heck the second opinion could reveal that you may be able to wait on having the filling done. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do small cavities need to be filled?

    Hello, This is actually a great question to ask and good for you for asking it. The answer is it really depends on a number of factors such as the size, location, which tooth it is on, how long has it been there, how good of oral hygiene the person has at home, how prone to cavities the person is, if the person is likely to come back for their next check up, etc. All these play a role in whether a small cavity needs to be filled. If it is between the teeth and smaller than the size of the instruments we use to take it out, the person has good oral hygiene (they take care of their teeth), and they come at least twice a year for cleanings, then perhaps we can wait to remove the cavity. However, if the person doesn't brush their teeth, and hasn't seen a dentist in 10 years then it is probably best to take care of it now while it is small and try to prevent a root canal and a crown for the person. If it is between the teeth and it is still in the enamel and you go back to the dentist in 6 months, they can take a look at it for you and see if it has changed. Sometimes they don't change for the rest of your life. Most places give out free second opinions so it might be worth a visit. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do dentists treat cavities between teeth?

    Hello, This is a great question! I did not even think of this question until I got into dental school. There are a variety of ways to treat cavities between teeth and it depends on the tooth being treated. However, the most common way in this day and age to treat a cavity between two back teeth is to start from the biting surface of the tooth infected with the cavity right on the edge of the tooth and go down the outer most side of it. A similar approach for front teeth is to go right on the end of the tooth from behind the tooth. This makes the aesthetics better as well. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can dentists fill cavities between teeth?

    Hello, Yes, dentist fill cavities between teeth. This is a large part of the cavities that we fill. These are cavities that we usually associated with inadequately flossing. It is done by strategically picking the location to start and going down the side of the tooth until we get to the cavity. Then they remove the cavity, any decay that might be there from the bacteria and then fill it. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do dentists fix cavities on front teeth?

    Hello, There are a variety of things dentist do to fix cavities on a front tooth depending on where the cavity is located on the front tooth. This is because aesthetics are very important here. If the cavity is between the teeth, but on the very edge of one we will go on the inside and go to the very edge of the tooth where the cavity is and come forward as we work. We will go slow and remove one layer at a time to make sure we get any decay left by bacteria, but also leave as much of the front of the tooth intact as possible. Once the cavity is cleaned out, we will then place a clear strip (we call it a matrix) between your teeth to prevent anything getting on the tooth next to the one with the cavity. Then we will put the filling in that best matches the color of your natural tooth and smooth it out. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it ok to brush your teeth with hot water?

    Hello, You do not hear about many people brushing their teeth with hot water, but as long as you are not burning your gums and lips with scalding hot water, it should be fine. Warm water should not be a problem. Hot water would just irritate your gums and lips and possibly your teeth if they sensitive or have a small cavity starting. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do I get rid of dry mouth at night?

    Hello, This is a very good question but not one easy to remedy. First, you want to discover what is causing your dry mouth at night. Dry mouth is most often caused by a medication a person is taking. There are hundreds of medications that cause dry mouth. However, dry mouth will also occur from breathing through your mouth while you sleep. This can happen from a couple of reasons as well. If your nose gets stuffy while you sleep during cold season, it is a natural unconscious reaction to slightly open your mouth and start breathing that way. This will make you wake up with dry mouth. First, it is important to identify why you are getting the dry mouth at night, then you can take steps to fix it. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you stop a hole in your tooth from hurting?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your tooth hurting. However, the only good way to get the hole in your tooth to stop hurting for longer then just a day is to get the hole filled. Now this could mean a few different things such as; fillings, root canal, crown, etc (depending on the size and location of the hole in your tooth). They do make over-the-counter topical pain relief agents that you can put on your tooth. Another thing people do is put a small piece of cotton in the hole to block food and liquids getting into the hold to cause more sensitivity. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does coffee cause enamel erosion?

    Hello, No, coffee does not usually cause enamel erosion. Coffee will stain many peoples teeth making them look dark between the teeth (this is the area that people have a hard time reaching while brushing and flossing). This staining will come off by a good cleaning at a dentist and will slowly build up again over time. Erosion is caused by foods and beverages that are acidic or foods and beverages that cause an acidic environment in your mouth. For example, tomatoes, wine, and citrus fruits are acidic, while soda is known to be bad not only for its acid level, but also because of the sugar content. Sugar contains glucose which feeds the bacteria in your mouth, and some of those bacteria product lactic acid while they grow which then erodes your enamel. Coffee itself does not do either one of these (until you put sugar in the coffee). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can Invisalign aligners be worn while drinking tea?

    Hello, Congratulations on the straighter teeth! No, Invisalign does not recommend that you eat or drink anything but room temperature to cool water with their aligners in. Remember the shape of the aligners are what causes your teeth to move in the manner we want them to move in. If they get distorted from a hot beverage, that aligner loses its ability to move your teeth in a predictable way. Also, remember that the aligners can pick up staining from the tea as well. Hope this helps you. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why does my tooth hurt when I put pressure on it?

    Hello, Discomfort when pressure is applied to a tooth could me a few things depending on the type of discomfort, the type of pressure, and how long it has been going on for. Does the pressure cause a sharp or dull pain? Is it pain or just feel like someone is pushing your tooth around? Is it all the time or just at certain times that you feel this? If it is at certain times during the day, you could have a subconscious clenching or grinding habit. This means that your tooth is sore from the periods of clenching or grinding. If it is more of a sharp pain sensation, it could mean that there is an infection around the bottom of the roots. As professionals, we need to use what the patient describes to us, our own testing, and X-rays to determine what the cause of your discomfort is. Perhaps you can get a free consultation with someone near you for a good evaluation. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What causes mouth dryness?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your dry mouth. There are a number of things that can cause dry mouth and sometimes hard to pin down. Medications and mouth breathing are the two most common. There are hundreds of medications that can cause dry mouth. If this is the case, you would speak with the doctor that prescribes the medication causing the dry mouth and he/she would evaluated whether they can change the dose or switch to a different medication. Just because a medication causes dry mouth in one person does not meant it will cause dry mouth in another person. Even over the counter medications can cause dry mouth. Are there any medications that you take before going to bed at night? Any allergy or sinus medications? These medications are used to dry out your sinuses so you can breathe at night. Breathing through your mouth is another common cause for dry mouth. While we sleep at night, our noses can get stuffy and the brain will open our mouth slightly so we can breathe without us waking up. This will dry out your mouth after a few minutes, and when you wake up, your mouth will be very dry. It helps to discuss with a professional your routine because dry mouth can be usually tracked down to something we do not even realize. For example, you say you wake up with dry mouth, how is the dry mouth throughout the day? Does it go away shortly after you wake up? We know it is occurring at night, but is there something that you do during the day to keep it going? Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why does my son keep getting cavities?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your son's cavities. As a parent, it can be very frustrating trying to figure this type of stuff out. Putting things in perspective can surely help us understand better and put things in perspective. It takes 3 things to for cavities: a host (in this case, your son's teeth), bacteria, and a food source for those bacteria. Without all three, you will generally will not get cavities. Obviously, your son has teeth; otherwise you would not be upset about the cavities. We know that from the time we are born we begin to get bacteria on our skin which helps protect us. What most people do not realize is that our teeth do not start erupting until later. As these teeth erupt, a variety of different types of bacteria start to grow on our teeth. This is a direct physical transfer from parents/care givers to the children (touching our own teeth and then theirs or visa versa or simple kisses). Some of the bacteria are particularly good at causing cavities. Finally, the bacteria need a food source and like most of it uses glucose (simple sugars) to grow and as it goes, it produces lactic acid. It is the lactic acid that causes the cavities. Now that we know all the things needed for a cavity we know that brushing and flossing will only disturb the process for a short time. However, we can try to disturb the process in other ways. Perhaps we can manipulate the diet to prevent cavities. Using less sugary food and drinks (less fruits with citric acid) could be more beneficial than brushing twice a day. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • When can I eat solid food after oral surgery?

    Hello, Glad to hear you are getting the treatment you need! Usually you can eat solid foods pretty soon after the oral surgery. For example, I had all of my wisdom teeth removed when I was 21; my first meal was a short stack of pancakes. I was not able to eat them how I normally ate pancakes and had to eat much smaller amounts and much slower, but I did not eat anything but solid foods after I had my wisdom teeth out. However, if you are having oral surgery that requires your jaw to be wired shut, you will not be able to eat solids until the wires come off. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How can I deep clean my gums at home?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your need for a deep cleaning. I am usually a big DIY (do it yourself) type of person. However, even if it was a good idea to do a deep cleaning at home by yourself, I do not even think it is possible. This is coming from someone who has spent too much time wondering if he could do a regular cleaning on himself. I do not think it is possible for the follow factors: all the different angles needed to get around all the different teeth in your mouth, get under the gums while looking into a mirror (sometimes two mirrors for certain areas like the inside of your lower front teeth) and ability to see what your are doing. Let alone factors like it takes professionals who do deep cleaning years of practice to understand what they are doing, what they are looking at, and how to best handle things that come up. All that being said, you can focus this energy on something else. Most places will give a free consult and free second opinion. Why don't you go to 3 different places and see if they all agree that you even need a deep cleaning? It would not be good to mess yourself up by trying something that you did not need in the first place. You may just be surprised what a different professional has to say. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What to eat after a deep teeth cleaning?

    Hello, A deep cleaning (scaling and root planing) is different for everyone and everyone experiences them differently. Some people need a deep cleaning all over their mouth while others only require it in certain areas. Keeping that in mind, I don't think that many people have had noticeable discomfort after a deep cleaning. As far as food is concerned, you only want to avoid things that will cause discomfort to you. So, foods that hot and foods that are spicy as this will irritate your gums and possibly cause them to bleed. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I drink coffee after a teeth cleaning?

    Hello, If you are getting a regular dental cleaning, yes, you can drink coffee afterwards. The biggest worry about drinking coffee after a cleaning is coffee's ability to stain your teeth. This staining affects different people in different ways and is a lot less powerful when you add milk to your coffee. If you are having a deep cleaning, then you might have some soreness afterward, which could be aggravated by hot coffee. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do gums heal back after deep cleaning?

    Hello, Yes, your gums will heal after getting a deep cleaning. A deep cleaning (what we call scaling and root planing) is usually done because the gums are inflamed and puffy. The purpose of the deep cleaning is to get the inflammation out of the gum tissues and have the gums heal. The deep cleaning does not injure the gums, but removes plaque, bacteria, and tartar (calculus) build-up, causing the gums to be inflamed. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What to eat after getting a root canal?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your need for a root canal. Your experience after the root canal is going to depend on what condition the tooth is in and which tooth it is. If the nerve inside the tooth has already started to become necrotic (die off from inflammation), then you are less likely to have discomfort after the fact. These people tend to have the root canal and never look back. They do not usually have a problem with eating after the root canal. However, if your nerve inside the tooth is alive and healthy then you may experience discomfort after your root canal and you will limit the amount you eat naturally. The location of the tooth is important to what foods you eat because if it is a front tooth you can avoid using it by cutting your food up with a fork and knife. If it is a back tooth, we used those teeth to chew with so avoiding it is more difficult. That being said, you can chew on the other side for the time being until any discomfort is gone. You may want to avoid foods that are very chewy or hard. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long should you wait to drink water after getting a tooth pulled?

    Hello, If you are having a tooth pulled you should wait about 30 minutes before drinking water. You can drink water before this if you need to, but you are going to be biting on gauze which would make drinking water difficult. You are also going to have anesthesia in your mouth so you may spill the water while trying to drink it. In this case, you might want to wait until the anesthesia wears off so everything feels normal. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Should you wear a night guard every night?

    Hello, This is a really good question! The answer really depends on why you are wearing the night guard. This may seem a little weird since the night guard is designed to protect your teeth from a grinding or clenching habit; however, it is important to distinguish if this is a chronic (long acting) habit or if it is more episodic habit (only occurs during times of stress in your life). If you are the type of person that has teeth that are all worn down to the same level or you have jaw pain when you wake up in the morning, it is possible that this is a chronic issue for you and you should consider wearing it every night. If you are the type of person that only has symptoms of grinding occasionally and your teeth are not worn too much you may be able to get away with wearing it only during the times that bother you. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What pain meds can I take for braces pain?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your pain and headaches. Your orthodontist should have went over this with you before you left the office and you should be able to give the office a call to find out what they specifically want you to do. However, it is normal to have some discomfort when you get a new wire on your braces and as long as you do not have any health concerns with taking medications you should be able to take ibuprofen for the pain. The pain should be subsiding as it should only last 2-3 days. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you swallow your dentures in your sleep?

    Hello, I take it this is the first time you got dentures? It is highly unlikely that you will swallow your dentures in your sleep unless you have a single tooth denture that is small. However, it is more a worry that you choke on your dentures then swallow them (even this is pretty hard to do). You should not sleep with your dentures in for a couple of other reasons as well. First, you put yourself at risk for a yeast infection in your mouth. Leaving your dentures in over night does not give your gums a chance to breath. By this, I mean you kill a bunch of the bacteria in your mouth that prevents the fungus from growing (the fungus takes over in the exact shape of your denture). Secondly, if you do not take them out over night then you have no time to clean them like they need. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do you brush your teeth before a dental cleaning?

    Hello, Glad to hear that you are concerned with keeping your teeth clean! People tend to be go either way with this one. Some people like their dentist to think that they take care of their teeth so they do not want go without brushing their teeth (even if it is the first time they have brushed their teeth in a while). Some people even come in and brush their teeth in the bathroom before their dentist visit. Others do not even think about it, and show up as they normally are (nothing wrong that, everyone knows what they are dealing with). If you brush your teeth regularly, then there is not much more you are going to do by brushing right before the dentist except for get any breakfast or lunch that you might have stuck in your teeth out. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What to avoid after a teeth cleaning?

    Hello, Glad to hear that you are taking care of your oral hygiene! I take it you are referring to foods/drinks to avoid after a dental cleaning? If this is the case, then it might be a minor detail, but you would want to avoid foods that stain your teeth (coffee, wine, pasta). Like I said, this is not as big of a deal as you would think though. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long should a dental cleaning take for a child?

    Hello, A cleaning for a 6-year-old child can be variable. I usually book an hour appointment. The exam and cleaning generally do not take that long, but it depends on the child's behavior and acceptance of the dentist working in his or her personal space. Some children have no problem with this (especially if the parent that takes him/her is very relax and accepting of the dentist - which can be very hard to do). X-rays can be very difficult and time consuming for the child as well since the ones that go in their mouths can be uncomfortable and require ability to bite correctly while everyone else leaves the room. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How often should I get my braces checked?

    Hello, Glad to hear you are straightening your teeth. You are going to love it. Usually, the orthodontist who put your braces on should tell you how often to come back. That being said, it could vary depending on how much they need to move your teeth and possibly other things (extractions or jaw surgery). When it comes down to only the braces part you usually get your braces checked every 4-6 weeks. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it okay to swallow blood after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your tooth extraction. Yes, it is okay if you swallowed a little blood after the extraction (provided it is your own blood). This does happen to a number of people during extractions depending on where the tooth is and how much they feel the need to swallow. Everything you swallow goes to your digestive system and the blood will be broken down there. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do I keep my teeth clean with braces?

    Hello, Congratulations on getting straight teeth! Keeping your teeth clean with braces on them is a difficult task for anyone. There are some things you can use that will make things easier. For example, some places give out special toothbrushes that have a V cut in the bristles to help get the bristles around the brackets and wires. Floss threaders are thin plastic pieces that you can tie floss to so you can get it over the wires. The other thing to keep in mind is that preventing cavities while having braces means to keep on top of keeping your teeth clean. First, make sure to at least rinse after each mean. This will minimize the amount of food that gets trapped against your teeth from the wires and brackets. If you can brush after each meal that would be even better. Secondly, do not get discouraged with flossing. It takes a bit of practice and some time to get it down while having braces on. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Are dental implants long-lasting?

    Hello, Glad to hear you are considering restoring the missing areas of teeth! The goal of dental implants is to be as long lasting as possible. In fact, they now have become our longest lasting way to replace missing teeth. Dental implants have a 10 year survival rate in the 98th percentile. However, this does not mean they will last a long time. Sometimes implants fail and have to be redone or have something else done. Dental implants are still prone to gum disease just like your regular teeth are. This will lead to implant failure much like it can lead to loss of a tooth. In contrast to regular teeth, however, dental implants are made out of titanium and porcelain, so they do not decay and get cavities like a normal tooth would. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why choose Invisalign?

    Hello, That is a very good question to ask. Invisalign is expensive and it is only getting more costly. Good for you to seek out the advantages. There are a couple of different clear aligners systems that work the same way (Invisalign is by far the biggest). There are several advantages to having your teeth straightened by clear aligners. First and most notable is that they are clear and more aesthetic. While sometimes there are attachments (bumps) that need to be put on your front teeth to help the process, these are usually the same color as your tooth and they much more aesthetic (if noticeable at all) then the brackets and wires that get put on for braces. Secondly, clear aligners have to be taken out for meals, so you have full ability to brush and floss whenever you want. Braces makes it hard to clean your teeth and get all the areas of your mouth so you can wind up with a couple cavities. Third, because of clear aligners are removable, you can take them out if you have speaking engagements and put them back in afterward. Additionally, since you can not eat with clear aligners in, they also tend to force you to cut back on your snaking throughout the day. Finally, there is a phenomenon called root resorption (the root of the tooth gets smaller and smaller making your tooth looser) that can happen during traditional braces. For an unknown reason, this does not seem to happen with clear aligners. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do I keep my teeth clean after a teeth cleaning?

    Hello, Happy to hear that you taking care of your oral hygiene. The best way to keep your teeth clean after a dental cleaning is to make sure you keep on top of brushing and flossing. After you clean your teeth, the leftover bacteria in your mouth start to replicate and by evening time they start making a plaque on your teeth. The next thing to do is brush and floss them again. You can also start using a mouthwash that will help keep your gums health as well. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What causes gum inflammation?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your inflamed gums. Inflamed gums can be caused by a variety of things. Gums are most commonly inflamed by plaque or calculus (hardened plaque) around or below the gum line. Gum tissue recognizes this as a foreign invader and the immune system kicks in causing your gums to get inflamed. This is good news as once this plaque or calculus is removed the gums usually heal on their own and the inflammation goes away. Crooked teeth can also cause gums to be inflamed. This is because the crooked teeth do not allow for good cleaning around the teeth (at home or by the dentist) and the plaque or calculus never gets removed. This normally requires your teeth to be out of alignment by a good amount though. Finally, a hormone imbalance in your body (caused illness or medications) can cause your gums to be inflamed. Steps to take to remove the inflammation are to make sure you are keeping your mouth clean by brushing and flossing, then going to a dentist to get rid of any plaque or calculus. After all this is exhausted and you still have inflammation, then it is possible that there is a hormone imbalance. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the best way to remove my wisdom teeth?

    Hello, Glad to hear you are getting the care you need. However, there are a number of variables to this question. Hopefully I can provide some insight. Wisdom teeth tend to be impacted but some are impacted worse than others. Some people do not have all 4 wisdom teeth (sometimes one or all of them can be missing). Then you have the option of being awake or put to sleep (general anesthesia) during the procedure. If you have all 4 wisdom teeth and they are impacted and you want to get them taken out at the same time to have it over and done with, then you should really consider being put to sleep for the procedure. You will wake up and through the next few days have some soreness, but it is over. If you are going to do 2 at a time, then you may not want to be put to sleep as it is less invasive and you don't have to do it twice. If it is only the top 2, then they tend to be easier and you might not need to be put to sleep at all. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I drink water after putting in Invisalign?

    Hello, Unfortunately, Invisalign recommends that you only drink room temperature to slightly cool water with your aligners in. Remember, the aligners are what is moving your teeth so the biggest concern is distorting the aligners. If this happens, your teeth will not move in the way that you want them to. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you floss a crowned tooth?

    Hello, Glad to hear you are concerned with flossing. Yes, you can floss a tooth with a crown on it. If it is a temporary crown then you want to make sure you put the floss between your teeth, floss, and then when you are done pull the floss through; do not pull it back up as this may dislodge the temporary crown. If it is a permanent crown you should not have this problem at all. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you floss between a bridge?

    Hello, Good for your for wanting to floss with a bridge. Having a bridge does change the way you have to floss a little. You cannot floss between the teeth on a bridge as they are connected on the sides. You can, however, floss underneath the bridge and they make specific floss threaders for this. It is a little plastic piece with an eye loop. You tie the floss to the eye loop and now the floss will slide under the bridge. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How can I make flossing easier?

    Hello, Good for you for being concerned with flossing. There are various products on the market that aim to make flossing easier (unfortunately most of these products are made out of plastic). However, if you want to make to make flossing the traditional way easier I wrap the floss around my two index fingers. I can then use my thumbs and middle fingers to direct it to where it it needs to go on top or bottom. It takes a bit of practice but you get used to it. Remember, after you put the floss in between your teeth, you want to slide it along each tooth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does having braces strengthen your teeth?

    Hello, Yes, braces is one of the options you have to straighten your teeth. Due to the side effects of braces (sharpness of the braces, cleaning difficulties, etc.), there would have to be a good reason to put braces on someones teeth if you were not going to straighten them. That being said, depending on how your teeth need to move to be aligned, you have other options like Invisalign. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What can I eat after bleaching my teeth?

    Hello, Congratulations on your teeth whitening. After bleaching your teeth, you want to say away from foods and drinks that cause the staining in the first place. Stuff like pasta sauce and wine are important to avoid; however, the big one that gets people is coffee and tea. It does help to know what affects you, though. Coffee and tea affect are a big cause for staining for some people, but others do not have a problem with it. The best coarse of action is to avoid the ones that stain your teeth worse. This is mainly for the first 48 hours; however, it stands to reason that the longer you can avoid food and drinks that stain your teeth, the longer the results of the whitening will last. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Should I worry about lines on my teeth?

    Hello, Are these lines something that you noticed in a certain light, and do they run top to bottom? If so, it sounds like they could be what we refer to craze lines. If they are craze lines, there is nothing to worry about. They are micro fractures in the enamel of the teeth and they are very common. Most of the time, people have them, they don't know because you can not see them. They start to become visible when the light hits them the right way, or if they pick up some staining. If they do pick up staining, you can do some teeth whitening to lighten them up again. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the safest form of teeth whitening?

    Hello, Whitening has a variety of complications that may occur, but probably will not in any given person. Sensitivity and chemical burns on the lips and gums are of the biggest concern. Over the years the sensitivity has decreased a tremendous amount. However, some form of peroxide is usually used in most teeth whitening and in higher concentrations it can cause a burn on your lip or gums. If this does happen, it is usually not a big deal as it just heals. The main focus of teeth whitening is about contact time of the peroxide and the concentration of the peroxide. The longer the contact time the better the results; however, the more likeliness of sensitivity. Because of this there are different ways to whiten. In office dental whitening has the highest concentration of peroxide but it is usually kept to 60 minutes or less for one session. The second type of whitening is to have a dentist make whitening trays for you and you put them in at night for 15 minutes for multiple days in a row. This usually gives the best whitening results because it is done for up to 12 days in a row. The final whitening would be over the counter (example: crest white strips). Because this is not monitored by a professional, it has the lowest concentration of peroxide and therefore has the lowest results. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do I keep my teeth white after whitening?

    Hello, The best way to keep the results of your whitening longer is to avoid foods and drinks that cause staining as well as brush and floss after meals that include foods that stain. It is best to know what affects you the most, but usual foods are pasta sauce, wine, and the big ones like coffee and tea. Usually at this point, most people lose some of their desire to keep the results as long as possible. However, adding milk to tea or coffee significantly reduces the staining properties. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can drinking milk strengthen teeth?

    Hello, Drinking milk adds calcium into your blood stream after it gets absorbed from your gut. It helps to think of your bones as if it was a large storage place for calcium as well as phosphate. As the amount of calcium in your blood goes up, your body stores more calcium in your bones. Calcium is a mineral and it does help strength bones. Teeth are very similar to bones in this regard. The important different is your teeth are not protected inside your body. They are in your mouth which is filled with bacteria and subject to acidic foods and drinks. This is where fluoride comes in. Fluoride is more resistant to the bacteria and acids making teeth even stronger than with calcium. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why do I have grey lines on my teeth?

    Hello, It sounds like you are referring to what dentists call craze lines. Do these lines run from your gums to the edge of the tooth? Did they just appear one day? If so, it certainly sounds like craze lines. These are micro fractures in the enamel that are very common. They are so small that most people do not know they are there until they pick up a little bit of staining. This makes them visible in the right line. That being said, a little bit of whitening usually takes care of the staining if your cleaning does not. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the best color for veneers?

    Hello, Congratulations on deciding to get veneers. First off, it is important to know that you are getting some type of porcelain veneers as these are the ones that will resist staining the best. When picking out a color, you have to look at the size of your smile (how many teeth show), which teeth you are putting veneers on (top, bottom, and how far back you will go). If you do not do all the teeth in your smile line, when someone makes you laugh you may see a difference which will make the teeth with veneers look fake. So, you have a choice: 1) get veneers on all the teeth in your smile line or 2) match the shade of the teeth in your smile line that you are not getting veneers on. Also, do not forget about your lower teeth. When people do the upper teeth and forget about the lower ones, you may be able to see a difference. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it ok to get a crown without a root canal?

    Hello, Yes, it is okay to get a crown without a root canal. Crowns and root canals are two separate treatments and have separate diagnosis for them. The reason you usually hear of them together is because it is usually on back teeth. When back teeth need root canals they usually need crowns as well. However, just because a tooth needs a crown does not mean it needs a root canal. Crowns can be location dependent. You can have a cavity or tooth fracture on a certain area of the tooth where the best way to fix it is a crown. When a root canal is needed it is usually because the cavity or fracture has gotten big enough to involve the nerve of the tooth. It is similar to the saying all thumbs are fingers, not all fingers are thumbs. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is using mouthwash everyday bad for you?

    Hello, Most mouthwashes are made for daily use. In fact, the companies making them would love for everyone to use them every day. That being said, you want to look at the ingredients. Alcohol-based mouthwashes may not be necessary. As dentists, we say that 1 of the 3 risk factors for oral cancer is alcohol. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it normal for other teeth to hurt after an extraction?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your extraction. While it is not common, it is very possible for the next to the extraction to have discomfort. While extracting a tooth the jaw bone is being pushed around a lot. This puts pressure on the teeth near it. This usually happens more in the back teeth then the front as well. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long will a new crown be sensitive?

    Hello, Teeth can be sensitive after getting a crown; however, most are not after getting a crown. There are a few things to consider. Did the tooth that is getting a crown have a root canal on it? If this is the case, you should have no sensitivity in the tooth itself, but possibility of very slight sensitivity in the gums. Has the tooth been bothering you recently? If this is the case, you may have sensitivity after the crown is prepared. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is brushing your teeth 3 times a day bad?

    Hello, No, brushing your teeth 3 times a days is not bad, providing you are doing it correctly. There are plenty of people who do not like the feeling of having food on their teeth, so they brush after every meal (a professor of mine in dental school used to brush 5 times a day). Brushing your teeth with a soft toothbrush and a light touch will help to reduce any abrasion or recession you can cause by brushing. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long after my extraction stitches are removed can I drink or eat?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your extraction. Usually, stitches placed after an extraction get removed about 1 week after the extraction. If your doctor gives you anesthesia to remove the stitches, then you might want to wait until that wears off so you don't bite your lip or cheek. Other than that, it is perfectly fine to eat after removal of the stitches. In fact, that is why your doctor is removing your stitches because they are no longer needed as your gum tissues are healed on their own. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What are the ways to close the gap between two frontal teeth?

    Hello, Closing the gap between your front teeth can be done best with braces or Invisalign. Is this the only gap you have between your teeth? You can usually get a free consult with a local doctor who can advise you the best/quickest way to fix your gap. One of the concerns about fixing a gap between the two front teeth is that little muscular attachment that connects your gums to you lips. Proper evaluation of the muscle can help determine how easy it will close that gap or if the gap will stay closed after the teeth are moved. Yes, this muscle can pull your teeth about again. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What could be the cause of my throbbing tooth pain?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your tooth pain. Does your tooth hurt when you are not chewing on it? If it does, the usual suspect for throbbing pain is something that is causing inflammation inside the tooth. This could be a cavity or cracked tooth. If it is a whole area and not just one tooth it could be from a grinding or clenching habit that you are unaware of. If it only hurts while you are chewing on it then it could be an infection around the roots of the tooth that gets compressed or a tooth with a micro crack in it that moves every time you bite down. As you can see, there is a variety of things that can cause your pain; you may want to see a doctor for a free consult to get it evaluated. Hope this helps and you feel better soon. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How effective are sensitivity toothpastes in treating the problem?

    Hello, Sensitive tooth pastes do not usually make a difference for the average person. However, sensitive toothpastes do work for some people that suffer from sensitivity while brushing their teeth. Figuring this out is a bit of a process though. Sometimes one sensitive toothpaste will work for one person with sensitive teeth, but it will not work so great for another person. That person might get much better relief from a different sensitive toothpaste. My wife for example: she used to use Sensodyne, but has found much better relief with Colgate's sensitive toothpaste. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is bad breath during cold and cough normal?

    Hello, Yes, bad breath can certainly be caused by having a cold and cough. There are several factors that play a role here. First you are taking antibiotics. Antibiotics change the type of that are thriving in your body. This antibiotic and wipe out a particular bacteria and let another one flourish which causes bad breath. Secondly, having a cold usually messes with the balance of bacteria in your body. Some one has prescribed you antibiotics so they either figure that your cold is from a bacterial sources (not the common virus), or the virus is causing a change in your bacteria which is causing a secondary infection by bacteria. Either way there is a change in the balance. Next, we have a cough which is your body trying to propel something out of your lungs which means going through your mouth. Finally, with all this going on nutrition and hydration tends to be lagging. Lack of proper nutrition and especially dehydration can cause bad breath. Hope this helps and hope you feel much better soon. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if TMJ is left untreated?

    Hello, It depends on what you are referring to as TMJ. I believe you are referring to TMD (temporomandibular disorders). But like the name says, there are multiple forms of TMD and most of which do not require any treatment. If you are talking about a click every now and then, then the current belief is that you can go on clicking for the rest of your life without a problem. This can come from a grinding or clenching habit that you may be unaware of. Massaging the area will give temporary relief if it bothers you. However, if you have a TMD that causes your mouth to stay open after you want to close it or stay closed after you want to open it (we refer to these as locking symptoms), then you should see a doctor to see what you can do about this issue. This is not as common clicking. You may want to check with a doctor who can take an X-ray and evaluate the situation, that way you have peace of mind as well. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is getting a dental bridge painful?

    Hello, No getting a bridge is usually not that painful. You will have local anesthesia at the very minimum. Once the local anesthesia takes effect you should not feel anything except perhaps boredom while the dentist does the work. There are possibilities of discomfort afterward that your doctor will go through with you before hand. Such possibilities depend on if there is a cavity in one of the teeth supporting the bridge and how deep the cavity is. Another one would be the angle of the teeth supporting the bridge. You should raise this question to the doctor before your bridge is started; it will help you both better understand the situation. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What can't you eat with a dental bridge?

    Hello, This usually depends on how long the bridge is and where it is in your mouth, but for the most part after the final bridge is in and everything is adjusted for your particular chewing habits, you should be able to eat all the stuff you were eating before (provided you weren't chewing on rocks!). If your doctor is going to give you a temporary bridge, then you should might want to be careful with sticky foods and hard foods. Sticky foods like candies and bread can pull a temporary bridge off and hard foods can cause a temporary bridge to break. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is a deep gum cleaning really necessary?

    Hello, I wish there was a good answer to your question. The professional in me knows that there are reasons for a deep cleaning. These reasons include increased gum pockets, bleeding in these gum pockets, and hardened plaque (also known as tartar or calculus) below your gum line. All of these indicate periodontal disease which will make your gums recede and eventually your teeth feel loose (this down the road, but the deep cleaning is what prevents this). If there is hardened plaque under your gums the only way to get it out is to go under there and removed (hence deep cleaning). Unfortunately, this can not be done with a tooth brush. These are all reasons why a deep cleaning may be necessary. However, the human in me knows that there are places and doctors that do not get enough money from the insurance company on a regular cleaning so they "recommend a deep cleaning." Unfortunately this happens all too much. If you are skeptical and want to avoid this, then I would suggest getting a second opinion. Most places should offer a free second opinion. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How can I fix receding gums naturally?

    Hello, Fixing receding gums naturally is a difficult task. Fixing receding gums by having gum grafts is very difficult. Unless you are going to have a gum graft you can not really replace the gums that have receded. You can, however, stop receding gums and probably do it naturally as well. First thing to do is to make sure that you are brushing and flossing properly. This means using a soft tooth brush and brushing lightly (you can actually cause gums to recede by brushing too hard). Secondly, a mouth rinse would help to kill bacteria that cause receding gums. If you do not want to use a store bought mouth rinse you can make your own natural one which consists mostly of a saline rinse (warm salt water). If the bacteria that cause receding gums can not grow, they cannot cause your gums to recede. Lastly, you should go to a dentist for regular check-ups just to monitor your progress, and if you get a cleaning, insist the doctor does your cleaning with natural materials. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does an overbite get worse with age?

    Hello, Teeth do tend to shift throughout our lifetime. Overbite and overjet are two things that are common and generally considered a good thing in a moderate amount. Overbite refers to how much your top teeth cover your lower teeth (do your top teeth go all the way down and touch your lower gums when you bite down). Overjet refers to how far your top teeth stick out in front of your lower teeth. Generally speaking, overjet changes throughout our life as our teeth like to shift forward, but overbite does not change much as this would mean there was something wrong with the height of your teeth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does dental cleaning damage enamel?

    Hello, A regular dental cleaning does not usually damage enamel. There would normally have to be something wrong with the enamel (possibly deminerialized or have a cavity underlying the enamel) for your enamel to get damaged during a routine cleaning. A deep cleaning involves going below the gum lines and cleaning where the enamel means the rest of the tooth (referred to as the cementum-enamel juction), which is an area where it is weak. Sometimes this juction even has a gap; so theoretically, a small amount of enamel can break off during a deep cleaning. This is very unlikely and usually causes no harm. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a tooth crack under a crown?

    Hello, It is unlikely that a tooth will crack under a crown; however, it can crack in the root or between the roots with a crown. This is actually something that can be difficult and frustrating to diagnose. Sometimes an X-ray can pick it up but sometimes it can not. Usually if this happens you will see the effects of the cracked root (deep pocket or infection around part of the root surface). However, if you have had root canal on that tooth it is also possible that the root canal is re-infected and it just needs to be re-treated. Hope this helps. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you fix chipped teeth?

    Hello, Yes, chips can be fixed in a few different ways depending on the severity and which teeth they are. You can put a bonding material on it (the stuff that is used for tooth colored fillings). You can put a veneer on it, or you can put a crown on it. There are a few factors that make people chose one over the other, but yes, it can be fixed. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does having scratch marks weaken teeth?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about these scratch marks. Are you referring to scratch marks created by trauma to the teeth? Or is it possible they are what we call craze lines (micro scratches that can be seen in the just the right light)? It the scratch came from something then it is possible to weaken the teeth depending on the severity of the scratch. If you are referring to what we call craze lines, then no they do not weaken teeth as they are very superficial. Hope this helps. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can naturally yellow teeth be whitened?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your naturally yellow teeth. Everyone tends to have a certain tint to their teeth. Most people have a yellow tint (which varies from person to person in severity) and some have a grey tint to them. In fact, yellow teeth tend to whiten a lot easier than grey tint as long as it is on the outside of the tooth. Hope this helps. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do veneers stain with coffee?

    Hello, This depends on the type of veneer. Most veneers are made out of some type of porcelain (yes, there are multiple kinds). However, some veneers are made out of a composite resin (bonding material). Veneers that are made out of porcelain do not tend to stain very easily. However, veneers made out of composite resin will stain and change color over time. Hope this helps. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does it take for hydrogen peroxide to whiten teeth?

    Hello, This all depends on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide. Low level hydrogen peroxide needs to be on the teeth longer than a higher concentration of hydrogen peroxide. However, higher concentration of hydrogen peroxide is very dangerous as it will burn your lips and gums. It is best that you visit a dentist to discuss whitening. Most of them will at least give you a free consult. Then you can learn about hydrogen peroxide and make your own decisions. Hope this helps. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How quickly does plaque grow?

    Hello, Some bacteria have the ability to replicate every 20 minutes (see how many you would get after 24 hours). So, if you brush your teeth one night there is a layer called the salivary pellicle that forms on your teeth almost instantly. After this adheres, the biofilm that we call plaque starts forming and the bacteria started growing and replicating. If you sleep for 8 hours and you started with 1 bacteria and it replicated every 20 minutes you would have 16,777,216 bacteria (and that is if you only left one behind when you brushed your teeth). So, plaque starts forming and builds up after a few hours. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the best teeth whitening treatment at the dentist?

    Hello, Asking a question like this to 10 dentists will probably get you 12 opinions. That being said I can give you my two opinions. Are you insistent on getting your teeth whitened at the dentist? There are multiple ways to whiten your teeth; over-the-counter, in the dental office, and at home given to you by a dentist. If you are the type of person that wants one shot deal and do it the dental office then there are a few different products and this largely depends on what the different sales reps tell the dentist is the best (I know, sad). I use opalescence boost with my patients that want to do in-office whitening. That is because I believe that this one gives the best results. However, if you want the best results overall, at home whitening (whitening trays made by a dentist) gives the best results. Research has shown that contact time is the most important factor in whitening teeth. At home whitening usually has 15 minute contact time, but you do it everyday for 12 days. This is in contrast to at the dentist for two 20 minute sessions. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is lemon water bad for your teeth?

    Hello, I hate to be the bearer of bad news, however, lemon water is bad for your teeth. Lemon water contains citrus acid, which demineralizes your enamel. This really becomes bad for your teeth when you stretch it out versus drinking it right away. It is also bad for your teeth to make it a habit, for example, daily. Hope this helps. Sorry for the bad news. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How many teeth can be extracted at the same time?

    Hello, As many as you can/want. It depends on the situation. If there is a pressing issue or someone is going to have after being put to sleep then you generally take out as many as possible. If you have the time and the ability to adjust to it, you can take out fewer so the patient has an adjustment period. If you want a denture made for immediately after your teeth are taken out, then it is custom to do all the back and let them heal; then do the front ones. Even in dental school students are taking out 8-10 at a time. Hope this helps! My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What makes you loopy after wisdom teeth removal?

    Hello, Usually, it is the residual anesthesia that makes you feel loopy after having your wisdom teeth extracted. Were you put to sleep when you had these extracted? The anesthesia's effect on your body goes on after your teeth are extracted. If not, it could very likely be any pain medication (narcotics) you might be taking. People have noted these types of feelings with Percocet and lesser with Vicodin. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What does it mean if your tooth hurts when you touch it?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your discomfort. It could mean a few things if it hurts when you touch your tooth. The simplest is maybe you bit down on a fork and aggravated your tooth. Moving up the serious scale is that you might have some recession and that is a sensitive part of your tooth, or you might have cavity. Getting more serious, you may have an infection at the end of your roots or a crack in your tooth. If you visit a doctor they will be able to get you a better diagnosis. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can dental nerve damage heal?

    Hello, Nerve damage can be finicky, are you sure you have it? Nerves in general have the ability to regenerate and heal; however, the healing process can be painful and it may not heal properly. I would make sure that this is really your issue though, that way something does not go undetected. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is considered oral surgery?

    Hello, Yes, most people consider wisdom tooth extraction oral surgery. A lot of times, your wisdom teeth have to be cut into sections to remove them without damaging anything else. When they do this sometimes they cut your gums and then put stitches back in when they are done. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Will my teeth fall out from receding gums?

    Hello, Yes and no. Teeth can and do fall out from periodontal disease which does have receding gums associated with it. However, teeth do not usually fall out from receding gums caused by a tooth brush. It is important to know why your gums are receding though. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a tooth with a root canal hurt years later?

    Hello, Yes, a tooth with a root canal can hurt years later. As a matter of fact, the amount of years relates to the success of the root canal. Two things are likely to have happened: re-infection (yes bacteria can get in there again and re-infect the tooth) or the tooth itself cracked. It is important to distinguish when it hurts. Hope this helps. Best luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does it take to straighten teeth with braces?

    Hello, Unfortunately, the time it takes to straighten teeth with braces depends on a lot of factors. The most important ones are how out of alignment your teeth currently are and how many of them you want straightened. A lot of people only want their front teeth straighten; which if you are able to do that, then the amount of time will be much shorter. Also, have you considered Invisalign? A lot of Invisalign cases are done in 6 months or less. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do braces damage teeth?

    Hello, No, braces do not usually damage teeth. They may cause some changes of the enamel color around the brackets, but they do not usually cause damage. Braces can, however, in rare cases cause resorption (shortening) of the roots of your teeth. This is something you do not normally see in Invisalign. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a 7 year old get braces?

    Hello, Yes, it is most likely too early for braces. Unless there is a need to fix a development problem with your son's upper or lower jaw braces do not normally start until age 12 when most of the baby teeth are gone. A 7-year-old child only has a few adult teeth and their baby teeth are supposed to have gaps between them. Most adult teeth are bigger than the baby teeth they are replacing so there has to be more space for them to come in. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do you have pain after a root canal?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your need for a root canal; however, it is good you are getting it fixed. People have different experiences with root canals. Some people will tell you it did not hurt at all (these people usually have dealt with the tooth pain long enough for the nerve inside to die). Some people say they have soreness (this is because the nerve is still somewhat healthy when it gets taken out during the root canal). It really depends on the health of the the nerve inside the tooth. However, you should only have some soreness, but that is about it. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long will my jaw hurt after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, Sorry about your losing of your tooth. Discomfort after an extraction depends on which tooth it is, how may roots it has, how old you are, and the length as well as shape of those roots. Back teeth have more roots on them which anchors them in better then front teeth. Longer roots also anchor teeth in better as well. Younger people have a much easier time after extractions because their bones are more flexible and allow the tooth to come out with more ease. After your extraction you will have some soreness of the area but nothing more than that. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do crowns hurt afterwards?

    Hello, No, a crown on a tooth should not hurt. However, there are some things that might cause some discomfort afterwards. If the tooth has not had a root canal that means the nerve inside is still relatively healthy. The blood vessels inside the center of the tooth can get swell up (just like any other part of your body if you bang it) just from having the process of the crown done. Secondly, if your bite is a little off after the crown is made that can cause that tooth to take a little more force while chewing which would cause discomfort. This can be alleviated by a simple adjustment. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you stop root canal pain?

    Hello, This all depends on where you are in the root canal process. Is this before the root canal procedure was started, in between when it was started and when it was finished, or after the root canal was completed? If it was before it was started, the best thing you can do is get the root canal process started because after the first step your pain should go away. If it is in between when it was started and when it was finished, then you should contact the doctor that started it as there are some things he/she can do to clean it out. If it is soon after the root canal is finished, you should definitely see a doctor as you should not have pain when a root canal is finished. There could be something else wrong with your tooth. If it is long after the root canal was done, then you might have a re-infection of the tooth and need a re-treatment of the root canal. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long should a filling be sensitive to cold?

    Hello, A filling can be sensitive to cold up to 8 weeks. This is usually extreme and does not last near that length of time, but according to the research it is very possible. This also varies depending on the size and the location of the filling as well as how close the filling was to the inside of the tooth. If it continues to linger on, you should let your doctor know. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why my tooth hurts when I drink something cold?

    Hello, There are a few different reasons why a tooth can be sensitive after drinking something cold. First, you could have a cavity in that tooth that you haven't noticed. When you have a cavity you loose part of the outer part of the tooth which means there is a part of the insulation which is missing. When cold water his this area you will feel like your tooth should have a coat on (this could be a small cavity or something much larger). A second reason for a sensitive tooth is a small amount of gum recession or exposure of the root of the tooth in an area. This again means you're missing part of the insulation of the tooth allowing the temperature change affect the inside of the tooth. A third reason could be if you had recent dental work done. If you have had a recent filling, lingering sensitivity could be from the filling material not giving as much insulation as you had before. If this is the case most times it subsides. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do metal braces work faster?

    Hello, Metal braces are the gold standard of orthodontics. They have been around for a long time. One of the things we learned about moving teeth is it is the amount of force on the teeth that is the most important factor and it is not a heavy force, but a light force we are looking for. When more force is added the teeth do not move as smooth as we want them too which makes the accuracy worse. So, as long as you achieve the optimal force for the most parts metal braces work just as long as anything else. One other thing to consider is moving back teeth. If you are only interested in your front teeth looking nice and your back teeth are fine, then moving just your front teeth will take less time and be less costly as well. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does a mucocele have to be removed?

    Hello, No, a mucocele does not need to be removed if it is not causing any problems at all. They can fluctuate in size and color; however, most of them just remain the way they are. It can be removed if it is unsightly or bothering you in some way, but most of the time they are benign. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long do immediate dentures last?

    Hello, Immediate dentures last indefinitely; however, the goal is around 6 months. There are a few things everyone considering immediate dentures should know. First, they are more then likely not going to fit when placed immediately. The reason for this is because after extractions there tends to be some swelling which wont let the dentures stay in. This swelling normally subsides after a few days. Secondly, they will have an estimated fit. When an immediate denture is made, the lab has to estimate where your jaw bone and gum tissues are going to be after the extractions. This is usually done pretty well; however, once the teeth are out, the jaw bone starts shrinking and the gums recede. This leaves the denture with a loose feel. After a couple months, you may have the denture relined to get rid of the loose fit; however you will develop the looseness again. This is when a more definitive denture is made because it is believed that the receding has minimized. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What causes an oral cyst?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your oral cyst. Did the doctor tell you it was a cyst? Oral cysts are pretty interesting because they are caused by your body. They are very old embryonic cells (cells from when you were a developing embryo) that have been dormant for decades, but begin to grow. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do I get rid of a bump in my mouth?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about the bump in your mouth. Getting rid of it depends on knowing what it is and where it is in your mouth. It could be something that is completely benign and does not need to be removed (unless you want it gone) or something that is more serious and needs a diagnosis before it can be removed. The best thing would be to get it looked at by a profession and then discuss how it can be removed if it needs to be removed. Hope this helps! My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the home remedy for cavity pain?

    Hello, Unfortunately, there is no good home remedy for cavity pain. Are you sure it is a cavity that is causing it? That being said, there is topical anesthetics like anbesol that will take the pain away for about 20 minutes. Other than that, ibuprofen is your best choice. Ibuprofen knocks down inflammation which relieves pressure on the nerve inside the tooth. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do they damage your jaw to remove wisdom teeth?

    Hello, That depends on your definition of damage. Usually on the lower ones, they have to cut the gums open and take the tooth out in sections to get the right angle. Sometimes they have to remove a little bit of bone around the tooth because it is covering the tooth a little. The upper wisdom teeth are usually much easier to handle without this stuff though. There is rarely accidental damage. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What are the disadvantages of veneers?

    Hello, There are different kinds of veneers out there and they each have their pros and cons. I am going to take it that you are referring to the popular porcelain veneers though. The disadvantages to porcelain veneers is that they are costly and that they will come off much more than a crown would. Yes, the crown does involve a little more tooth structure; however, they do not come off as easily as veneers (when they do come off they both tend to give you that look of missing a front tooth). Another thing to consider when thinking about getting veneers is that not everyone should get them over a crown. Someone that has a grinding/clenching habit while they are sleeping or while awake should consider something more sturdy like a crown (which is usually similar in price). Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is removing wisdom teeth major surgery?

    Hello, No, removing wisdom teeth is not major surgery. Some involve more than others depending on the way the teeth are facing and the root length and structure, but it is not what I would define as major surgery. It is not life-threatening and not something that will put out for more than an hour or an hour and a half. The recovery time is usually a day or two to be functional again. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do crowns on front teeth look natural?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about the need for a crown. However, they can look very natural. Actually, most dentists really strive to make them look so close that you can't tell. Not all crowns are created equal though. There are several different types of crowns and each one has different aesthetic properties. If you ask a handful of dentists which one is the best, you will get a handful of answers. It is probably best to go with the one that the dentist doing it is most comfortable with. Most of them will look perfect though. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the strongest crown for teeth?

    Hello, Dental materials are always changing and this is an area of focus right now. Strength is an interesting concept. The strongest 1 piece crown right now is the full strength zirconia crown. In my opinion, the only thing that compares to this would be a full metal crown, but then it will never match your teeth. Is strength the only thing you want to consider? If it is in the front, then would you be interested in aesthetics as well? Anyway, the majority of the ones I do are full-strength zirconia crowns. Hope this helps! My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do crowns ruin your teeth?

    Hello, What do you mean by ruin your teeth? A nicely done and well taken care of crown should last decades. Teeth are curvy and in order to place a crown on a tooth the dentist does need to re-contour your tooth so the crown can slide on. They also need to do this because if you put something over your tooth it would be too high and you would constantly be biting on it. So the outer layer of tooth gets re-contoured and replaced with the crown material. You can think of it like getting a hair cut to make your hat fit. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you clean under a dental bridge?

    Hello, Cleaning under a bridge is usually done with floss threaders. They are little flexible plastic pieces that you can tie the floss to and slide under the bridge. Your dentist should give you a few. However, bridges made today are usually made with nice contact between the bridge and your gums so not much can get under the bridge. Maybe you want to see a dentist to evaluate the bridge. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does an implant last?

    Hello, This is actually a very good question to ask. Unfortunately, the answer is not so simple or straightforward. The idea is to get the implant to last forever (or as long as we possibly can). There are factors that come into play with the longevity of an implant though. Obvious factors that lower the longevity are periodontal disease, smoking, and lack of cleaning. Non- obvious factors the lower the longevity are: the tooth the implant is replacing, the size and shape of the bone, the size and shape of the implant, the angle the implant is placed on, the person placing the implant, the amount of contact on the tooth part of the implant, and the person restoring the implant. A lot of these factors are why you see different prices for implants. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is a dental bridge permanent?

    Hello, Yes, the bridge is permanent in the sense that you or the dentist can not take it out so easily (usually needs to be cut out). It is also permanent in the sense that with proper care it should last for decades. The cement might give way after about 10-15 years, but a dentist should be able to cement it back in for you for even longer. However, in dental school they try to teach you not to say permanent because nothing we do in dentistry lasts longer than what god gave you, or what you were born with. This is actually a good thing though, if it were, we would recommend that everyone get bridges then. You can still get cavities around the edges of the bridge, so it still requires care. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you floss with braces?

    Hello, You can use a floss threader to go under the wire. A floss threader is a flexible plastic piece that you can tie floss to. It will guide the floss over the wire and then you can place the floss between your teeth like you normally would. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Does losing teeth change your jaw shape?

    Hello, Yes, losing your teeth changes your jaw shape. Just like a person who works out and has big muscles, when they stop working out, those muscles get smaller. Your jaw bone has the size and shape it does because it is there to support your teeth. If you take a tooth out, your body no longer has to support that tooth so it does not waste energy on those cells. That part of your jaw will get smaller. This happens regardless of age. It is the amount of time that the tooth has been missing. That being said, it does not happen right away. If it is only one tooth, you will likely not notice that much of a difference. If it is a lot of teeth, picture a person that has dentures when then they take them out. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Are Emax Veneers Porcelain?

    Hello, Yes, Emax is a type of pressed porcelain. Usually, they make crowns out of Emax. Emax has good aesthetics, but are a little lower in strength. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Which is better Emax or zirconia?

    Hello, Emax and Zirconia have different properties, which means they will have pros and cons. The first thing to consider is what type of restoration is being done (crown, veneer, implant crown, etc.). The second thing to consider is which tooth being restored (front or back). The third thing to consider the adjacent teeth. Emax generally has slightly better aesthetics; however, it is much weaker than zirconia. If it is a back tooth then the choice is clearly zirconia as it can be stained to look quite nice and you get the superior strength. If it is a front tooth, then you have a couple choices. Zirconia has an aesthetic version now which is not as strong, but looks even nicer. You can use Emax, but you run the risk of it breaking. Looking at the teeth next to the one being worked on will help as that is the aesthetics you have to match. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you sleep with partial dentures in your mouth?

    Hello, The answer to your question is, yes; however, just because you can do something physically does not mean you should do it. You may wake up coughing if it gets dislodged, but worse yet is when people start doing this they wind up with a fungal infection in their mouth. Leaving the partial sitting on your gums overnight winds up killing off bacteria, which then leads to growth of the organism candida albicans, which is a fungus. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does a root canal take?

    Hello, The time it takes to do a root canal varies with each tooth and the situation that caused the tooth to need the root canal. It also varies depending on who is doing the root canal (a specialist or a general dentist). Generally speaking, root canals are scheduled for one hour. Sometimes you need to come back for a second visit 2 weeks later, which will take between 30 to 60 minutes to complete depending on the presence of an infection. Hope this helps My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you chew gum with a dental bridge?

    Hello, Yes, you can chew gum with a dental bridge. The question is whether you should or not. One thing to consider is where the bridge is. If the bridge is on your front teeth, you do not normally chew with these teeth unless there is something wrong with your back teeth. That means you wont really be chewing with the bridge. If it is on your back teeth, the bridge should be designed to chew with so you should not have any issues with it. The most common problem would be if the cement gives way the bridge can come out. This should not be the case, but it is a possibility. Think of chewing gum as chewing any food without the nutrition. If it comes off from chewing gum, it will eventually come off from chewing food. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it ok to sleep with your dentures in?

    Hello, It is not a good idea to sleep with dentures in your mouth. While it is unlikely that you will choke on them, they can move around and cause you some discomfort while you sleep. You could also spit them out while you sleep as well. Perhaps the biggest reason you should not sleep with dentures in is that they cause a change in the bacteria in your mouth and you will likely wind up with a yeast infection in the exact shape of your denture. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can your body reject a tooth implant?

    Hello, Some people use that phrase when they talk about an implant failing because it is easier to understand. If you think about it, your body has all different types of cells, but it knows those cells. When you put an implant in your body (any type of implant: dental, hip, rod, etc.), it is a foreign object to your body. The goal is to get your body's immune system to not react to it. Over decades, we have discovered that titanium is great at going unnoticed by the body, so most implants are made out of titanium. That being said, dental implants can still fail because someone's immune system is trying to attach "the foreign body." While that situation is very rare, it is more likely that the implant fails for another reason. Most often, periodontal disease (most people don't understand) which can be made worse by other factors like diabetes or smoking. It is here the implant fails to lock in with your jaw bone and becomes loose and can fail. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do dentures change your face shape?

    Hello, Yes, dentures CAN change your face shape. However, when making dentures, the goal is not to let this happen. Your lips are supported by your upper teeth (notice that your lower lip rests on the edges of your top teeth). If you take your teeth out, your lips will sink into your face. When dentures are made, care is taken to make sure the teeth are placed in the same position where the persons natural teeth were (this becomes challenging when the teeth are already missing). The second factor is your teeth give your face its height. Shorter teeth will make your face look shorter and your chin more prominent. Longer teeth will make your face look longer and your chin less prominent but also like you have something in your mouth all the time. So, the correct height of the teeth is also that can effect the way you face looks. All this is taken into account when making dentures so that way the person can look as natural as possible. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do fixed retainers stop teeth from moving?

    Hello, Fix retainers stop your teeth from moving as long as they are in place just like removable retainers. The main difference is that you know when your removable retainers are not in place. Fixed retainers can come off of a tooth ever so slightly without you knowing about it. This will allow that tooth to move. I personally have had this happen to me. If you are going to get fixed retainers then it is advisable to make sure you see your dentist every 6 months to make sure that they are still attached properly. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can I drink coffee with Invisalign?

    Hello, No, it is not advisable to drink coffee with Invisalign aligners in. Invisalign recommends the only thing you drink with your aligners in is cool (room temperature) water. Keep in mind these are plastic aligners and they work by pushing teeth in the direction we want them to go. Hot or cold drinks can distort the aligner which will either push the tooth in a direction we don't want it to go, or not move the tooth at all (this is most likely). You can however take the aligners out, then drink the coffee. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What to expect when getting teeth removed?

    Hello, Sorry about your tooth, but glad to hear you are getting healthier. The removal of a tooth will require local anesthesia. This will ensure that you do not feel any sharpness and only pressure. Afterward, the removal of the tooth they will give you instructions on how to care for that area in the next few days. You will have some soreness in that area and possibly some stitches. They will also give you some medication for the soreness. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do I know if my tooth extraction is infected?

    Hello, The best way to know is to go to a doctor to have him/her exam you. Without doing that, you would have to look for signs of infection like swelling, pus, pain, distorted tissues, etc. However, some of these signs may not indicate infection. They could indicate dry socket, or normal healing. How long after the extraction has it been? When did the symptoms start occurring? These are all things that need to be known for infection. Hope this helps. My best to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does the blood clot stay after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, A blood clot will stay in the socket after an extracted tooth until it is replaced by something else or it becomes dislodged. It gets replaced by bone cells and gum cells. It can get dislodged by something that causes pressure changes in your mouth after the extraction; such as, dragging on a cigarette, drinking through a straw, or spitting. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is having a dry socket dangerous?

    Hello, Having dry socket is certainly not the end of the world. Sometimes it is pretty much unavoidable. Dry socket is simply losing the blood clot that forms right after having a tooth removed. This leaves your jaw exposed and unprotected while it heals. Most cases take up to 2 weeks to heal but it will heal eventually. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How can I make my tooth extraction heal faster?

    Hello, Unfortunately healing after a tooth extraction is a pretty specific biological task (only your body can do it). That being said you can certainly do things to help your body heal the quickest. After the first 24 hours you can rinse with warm salt water which will help keep the area clean and allow you to heal the fastest you can heal. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How does a salt water rinse help gums?

    Hello, Salt water rinse is a saline solution. Your mouth is filling with all types of bacteria and using a salt water rinse kills bacteria. While you are killing all different types of bacteria with the salt water rinse, you are also killing the ones that cause gum disease which keeps your gums healthy. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How does smoking affect oral surgery?

    Hello, Hope the oral surgery helps you out well. Smoking slows the body's ability to heal. If you are having teeth extracted at the same time, smoking afterwards puts you at risk of having dry socket. Dragging on a cigarette causes a pressure change in your mouth which could dislodge the blood clot after an extraction. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if I smoke after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, Smoking after a tooth extraction puts you at risk for dry socket. After you have a tooth extracted, you have an empty socket that fills up with blood forming a clot. When drag on a cigarette, drink threw a straw, or spit it causes a change in pressure in your mouth that can dislodge that clot. Once is is out, you lose protection during the healing process which is dry socket which can be a very painful condition. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it safe to gargle with salt water every day?

    Hello, Do you feel a need to gargle with salt water every day? If you do perhaps you have something going on that needs to be looked at by a professional. Anyway, as long as the concentration is correct and you have no other illnesses you should be fine. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the best way to clean dentures?

    Hello, Soak them over night in a denture cleaner that you can pick up at any pharmacy. You can lightly brush them with a tooth brush to get food particles off afterward. You do not want to use tooth paste because it has abrasives in it and you will scratch the denture. After soaking it, make you rinse it before it back in. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How does a child get a tooth extraction under anesthesia?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about that stubborn tooth. The anesthesia choices for children are similar to the same ones for adults. The child's behavior is usually what dictates the anesthesia choice. If the child is fearful and you do not want to give him a bad experience at the dentist then there are surgery centers where they will give your child general anesthesia (put him/her to sleep) while they take the tooth out so he/her does not remember anything. If he is not bothered by the dentist they can give him local anesthesia and the laughing gas. If it is simple to take out the tooth they may just give him local anesthesia. This is something that you should discuss with the doctor before the appointment so you are aware and can prepare for anything. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long do you have bad breath after gum disease?

    Hello, Hope your breath gets better quick. Gum disease is not usually a problem you can solve in one visit. First, it is best if you can identify that gum disease is what is causing your bad breath. Then gum disease requires treatment and follow up up treatment to stop the disease. Usually you see a dentist every 3 months afterward (sometimes local antibiotics are given to change the type of bacteria around your teeth). If you get a change in the type of bacteria then you should have a change in your breath. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • When can I use mouthwash after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, I usually advise my patients to stay away from mouth wash for 2 days. I usually do not have them rinse at all for atleast the first 24 hours. This is because you want to protect the blood clot that forms after having a tooth extraction. The blood clot is not very stable for the first 24 hours and if you lose it, you wind up with dry socket. Generally you don't want to spit anything out of your mouth or use a straw or smoke because the pressure can dislodge the blood clot. After this period, you will can start rinsing but it is more advisable to use warm salt water. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a filling be done on a wisdom tooth?

    Hello, Yes, a filling can be done on a wisdom tooth; in fact, there are a lot of people out there that have fillings on their wisdom teeth. There are even people that have crowns and bridges on their wisdom teeth. Most of the time people do not have the advantage of having a straight functional wisdom tooth. However, there are people that have wisdom teeth that come in straight and are functional. In these cases, it may not be the best to take out a wisdom tooth just because it has a small filling in it. Another reason for doing a filling on a wisdom tooth is if its roots are close to a nerve that we want to avoid. Hope this helps Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if wisdom teeth decay?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your wisdom tooth. The options for wisdom teeth that have decay in them are pretty much the same as the options for any other tooth with decay (extraction, filling, crown). It is our opinion on which one of these options is best and that opinion is based on the circumstances. If you have a nice straight wisdom tooth not causing any problems, or a wisdom tooth that has its roots near a nerve that we want to avoid; then we might consider doing a simple filling (possibly a crown if decay is large enough, I have even seen some with bridges on it). If your wisdom tooth is not straight and you don't use it to chew then we may think it is better to extract the decayed wisdom tooth so you don't have to deal with it in the future. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you clean wisdom teeth holes?

    Hello, Glad to hear you are in the healing process. The best way to keep wisdom tooth extraction sites (holes) clean is to use a warm salt water rinse after each meal. Some doctors that extract wisdom tooth give out little syringes that are basically like a water gun to keep the food debris out. That being said, you do not want to rinse so much that you remove the clot or you could wide up with a condition called dry socket. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is heat good for wisdom teeth pain?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your wisdom tooth pain. Generally, heat does not alleviate pain from wisdom teeth. It normally makes pain worse. That being said, if you have tried it and it helps, then it will help you. Pain is usually caused by inflammation and swelling. At this point, you would want to see a doctor to correctly identify where the pain is coming from and appropriately treat it. The doctor can also tell you appropriate medication to take (example: ibuprofen, Vicodin, antibiotic, etc.) as well. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can brushing your teeth help a toothache?

    Hello, As a general rule of thumb, brushing your teeth does not help a toothache to go away. However, it does help if your pain is caused by something lodged between your gums and your tooth or if you have something irritating your tooth that you can remove. Also, you may get the effect of the ingredients in the tooth paste to provide temporary relief. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long do you have to rest after wisdom teeth removal?

    Hello, Rest time after wisdom teeth is highly variable. However, you already know that you are having 2 done instead of 4, so you will have some abilities that others do not. It also depends if they are the upper teeth, lower teeth, or a combination of both? Recovery time and discomfort for upper wisdom teeth is normally less. Usually, if you have all 4 removed and have no complications it will take about 2-3 days. If you only have 2 taken out without complications, it should not be this long. It is also important to know that if they are impacted they will take more to extract them and the recovery time may be longer. Finally, it is important to take care of them properly afterward and follow your doctors instructions to prevent post-extraction complications which would extend the recovery like dry socket. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the best thing to eat after getting wisdom teeth out?

    Hello, The best thing to eat after having your wisdom teeth out would be what the doctor taking them out suggests. You generally want to avoid hot foods, spicy foods, and foods that make your mouth difficult to clean after eating. My personal experience when I got my wisdom teeth out (all 4 at once) I had a short stack of pancakes. This came about because the last thing the doctor talked about before they put me to sleep was having a short stack and I told them they were talking about something I wont be able to eat for a while. The last thing I remember before going to sleep was the doctor say, "Oh, you can have a short stack when you get up." That was all I needed to know! Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Should I get Invisalign at age 30?

    Hello, The real question is do you need or want Invisalign? If the answer is yes, then why not? I treat people with Invisalign older than 30 all the time. In fact, this was kind of the foundation for Invisalign. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you flush out a dry socket?

    Hello, Sorry to hear that you have dry socket (I hope you informed the doctor that extracted your teeth). You can not flush out dry socket. Your bone heals after an extraction from the sides of the socket. The first step is to form a blood clot in the socket to protect the socket from bacteria in your mouth and food. It also helps during the healing process. Dry socket is when you lose that clot. This means that your socket is now exposed to everything mentioned above. The best way to manage dry socket is by keeping it clean: warm salt water rinses. If it is painful you can see the doctor that extracted your tooth and ask him/her to put in dry socket paste (this usually alleviates the pain, but it does taste pretty bad). Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can you have a dry socket without pain?

    Hello, I am glad to hear you are not having pain. To answer your question, yes, it is rare. But you can have dry socket without having pain. Dry socket comes in lots of different forms usually with pain, but sometimes without. If you do warm salt water rinses throughout the day, it will help the dry socket heal faster. You might also want to let the doctor who extracted your tooth know. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can wisdom tooth pain go away on its own?

    Hello, It is good to hear that your pain is subsiding! Yes, wisdom tooth pain does tend to come and go during times. It would be helpful if you can verify if that is where the source of your discomfort was coming from (people who grind or clench tend to have discomfort in the area of their wisdom teeth as well). If it is your wisdom teeth, you should consider getting them removed as the pain tends to come back until it stays for a while. Also, it is easier to extract wisdom teeth at a younger age (usually 28 or less) because our bone are softer (the same reason older people tend to break a hip). You are only 26, so your recovery time would be much better then if you were older (just some food for thought - pun intended). Hope you feel better. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if you never get your wisdom teeth pulled out?

    Hello, If you do not get your wisdom teeth out there are a couple of outcomes that are possible. One of those outcomes can be absolutely nothing. As long as your wisdom teeth are not problematic in the rest of your life, then nothing will happen. However, if you do not get them taken out and they do cause a problem (a cavity or gum issue), then you may have to have them out later in life, which is usually harder to remove and the recovery may be a little more difficult. This is the downside of waiting till later in life to have a problematic wisdom tooth take out. Hope this helps you. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why is my tooth still sensitive after getting dentures?

    Hello, Sorry about your discomfort. Teeth can be sensitive after getting dentures for a variety of reasons (denture clasp rubbing on the tooth in a sensitive area, clasp too tight, bite changes). How does your tooth feel when you take your denture out of your mouth? The best thing to do is see a dentist to determine the cause of the sensitivity. Most dentists understand that when they make a denture, the patient is going to need adjustments or have concerns (especially if it is the the person's first denture). Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long do dental implants last?

    Hello, Dental implants can vary in the amount of time they last. Some of the variables include; how the implant is placed, who places the implant (specialists have a longer survival rate of implants than general dentists), how soon the tooth starts functioning after the implant is placed. Which implant is placed, which size implant is placed, how many teeth the implant is replacing. While there are a lot of factors that go into the longevity of an implant, you should realized that while they usually fail for periodontal (gum) disease, an implant will not decay and get a cavity. The goal of any good dentist is always to get the implant to last for the rest of your life. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it normal for a crown to be sensitive?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your tooth sensitivity. It is not normal for your tooth to be sensitive after a crown is placed; however, it is not an uncommon reaction either. An important distinction here is, do you have a temporary crown on, or is this after the permanent one was put on? If it was after the permanent one was put on, but did not have sensitivity when the temporary one was put on on, you might require a bite adjustment. If it was when the temporary one was put on it could be a bite adjustment or sensitivity in the tooth after being worked on. Inflammation can happen inside the tooth from being worked on. This can cause sensitivity. It is best to make sure that you do not need a simple bite adjustment and then go from there. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why are some teeth more prone to cavities?

    Hello, This is a good question to be asking. Different teeth are prone to cavities because of the nature of what we eat and how we eat it. Remember cavities are caused by bacteria and those bacteria need sugars to grow and ferment lactic acid which breaks down your enamel. Now when we eat foods with sugar or most foods in general we chew them with our back teeth. Our front teeth are not for chewing, they are for biting into things. We do not need to do this as much as other animals because we have the ability to cut up our food and we do not bite into things as much. Regardless, we take one bite into a sandwich and then we chew for a minute with our back teeth. The back teeth grind up all the sugar (glucose) and mash it into each other. Now as far as some back teeth over others, there is a hierarchy of back teeth based on tooth size, location, and the way our jaws come together. We also have to remember that we need to floss to prevent cavities in the sides of our teeth, and it is a lot harder to floss back teeth. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Why do I get cavities even though I brush and floss?

    Hello, This is a very good question for you to be asking. It takes 3 things for cavities to develop. 1) a tooth, 2) bacteria, and 3) food for the bacteria to grow (glucose aka sugar). This makes it seem simple, but it does get complex quickly. Everyone's bacteria make up is different. Some people get a lot more of the bacteria that cause cavities; while others get bacteria that actually help to prevent cavities (yes they do exist!). Most people look at their brushing and flossing habits and wonder why it isn't working. Well, we also have to look at what we are feeding the bacteria and when we are feeding them. Bacteria basically eat glucose (the simplest sugar) and ferment lactic acid. Lactic acid is what forms the cavity in your enamel and let the bacteria in. The best way to treat this is to work with a dentist and arm yourself with knowledge in preventative dentistry. Hope this helps! Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it normal to have bad breath after a tooth extraction?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your extraction issue. It is not uncommon to have bad breath after an extraction, but there could also be an infection. It could also be a symptom of dry socket. You should call the doctor that extracted your tooth to talk to him/her and possibly go in to have them evaluate it. Hope it gets better for you soon! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can turmeric relieve a toothache?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your toothache. Turmeric does have natural anti-inflammatory properties. A lot of toothaches are caused by inflammation so it generally will take the edge off, but only has a temporary relief to get you to a doctor to see what the cause of the inflammation is. Hope you feel better soon! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can oral cysts go away on their own?

    Hello hope you are well, The first thing to do is make sure that they are cysts and not from something else. Cysts come from cells from when we were embryos and because of this they unfortunately do not go away on their own. You usually do not get several of them at once either. This is something you would want a professional to exam. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a crown that is too high cause pain?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your pain. Yes, a crown is made to a very specific height due to specific dimension involved. A crown that is too high will mean that every time you bite down, the tooth with the high crown will take most of the force. While it is an annoyance, this is not something to let go because it could cause the need for a root canal or an extraction (due to breaking). If it is the fact that the crown is high and that is what is causing the pain, then a simple adjustment usually fixes the problem. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Should old amalgam fillings be replaced?

    Hello, If amalgam fillings are defective, they should be replaced. If they are not defective, then replacing them is more of an aesthetic or mercury concern. If it is a mercury concern then it should be noted that once placed the mercury is usually confined to the amalgam, and it gets released into the air (where you can breath it in) when the dentist drills out the old amalgam. Also, it is important to know that if replacing them with a tooth colored filling, these fillings usually contain BPA. If it is an aesthetic concern then that is is simple, they do not look as good as the tooth colored fillings. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is a white filling better than silver?

    Hello, This is an age old question that comes up a lot and many people have many different answers and opinions to this question. There are many things to consider when answering which filling material is better. Most of the research has shown that silver fillings last longer on average (only by a couple of years, 15 vs 17). The preparation that goes into a silver filling usually involves taking out more tooth structure, then you would for a tooth colored filling (silver fillings will usually last longer in bigger fillings because the tooth structure is already missing). Another thing to consider is where the filling is located. If it is on the back of your last tooth on the top of your mouth, the esthetics of having a silver filling is not nearly as bad as having it on the front of your front tooth. Another variable that is important to some is the type of material that it is makes up the filling. It has been long established that silver fillings contain mercury. For the most part this mercury is stable inside the filling (it is worse for the dentist who is taking out a silver filling because that person is vaporizing the mercury and breathing it in everyday). This may seem bad but then we have to remember tooth colored filling material usually contains BPA (the long term effects of this are still unknown). Most people still prefer the white color filling because of its esthetics and the fact that less of your tooth has to be removed. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long do white fillings last?

    Hello, The longevity of tooth colored fillings varies depending on a few factors (how big the filling is, how many walls of the tooth the filling covers, the specific tooth that the filling is going in, and then there are people specific variables). That being said, tooth colored fillings usually have an average of 15 years. Insurance companies will usually pay to redo a filling every 2 years. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How often are Invisalign aligners replaced?

    Hello, Invisalign just stated recommending that aligners can be replaced every week; however, they still advise that some situations they should still replace them every 2 weeks. Hope this helps. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How do you know if your filling is infected?

    Hello, The best way to know if you have a re-infection of a tooth with a filling is a visual and X-ray exam. Since you have a toothache the first thing to do is to make sure you know what tooth it is coming from, then determine what is causing this toothache, then how to best alleviate the toothache. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What is the cause of my bad breath?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your breath. Bad breath can be caused by a variety of factors; however, it is most often the combination of bacteria in your mouth. Several hundred different types of bacteria live in your mouth and you could have had something cause a change in the ratios that the live in. It would be best to see a doctor to identify any changes that could have occurred to make this happen to you. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is listerine good for swollen gums?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your swollen gums. Listerine is a good antiseptic rinse which will help your gums when used properly. The best advice I could give you is to find out why your gums are swollen, take care of that issue, and then, if you can use, Listerine to maintain healthy gums if you need/want. Best of luck! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is it too late to straighten my teeth?

    Hello, Congrats on deciding to straighten your teeth. No, 30 years old is not too late to straighten any ones teeth. This is a very common age group for people to desire straight teeth and a very common age group for Invisalign. I myself had braces put on when I was in my early 30s and I am a dentist! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Should I get my teeth cleaned before whitening?

    Hello, Congrats on deciding to get whiter teeth. Yes, you should get your teeth cleaned before you have a whitening procedure. Teeth often pick up stains that we do not know about, and putting whitening gel on these stains would be useless for you. It will give you better results to remove any stains first and then whitening your teeth. Best of luck! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a dentist remove coffee stains?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your coffee stains concerns. Yes, most coffee stains can be removed at the dentist's office. That being said, it is important to distinguish if it is a coffee stain that you see or not. This would be a good question at prior to your next dental cleaning. There are a number of stains that a dentist cannot remove. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What happens if you never get your wisdom teeth pulled out?

    Hello, The consequences of not having your wisdom teeth removed remain the same for everyone; however, the risk of the consequences is what changes. The consequences include future cavities in your wisdom teeth, future cavities in your teeth in front of your wisdom teeth, gum recession and bone loss around your wisdom teeth and the teeth in front of your wisdom teeth, as well as a condition known as pericoronitis. If your wisdom teeth erupt into your mouth they can be at various angles and various heights. It is the angles and heights that change the risk of the issues mentioned above. Keep in mind that the risk can also be elevated by your ability to keep that area of your mouth clean (as well as your dentist). Finally, it is best to consider your age. Bones get more brittle as we get older (hence why hips break more often in older people). This makes removing teeth more difficult, which will make the recovery more difficult. 28 years old is a general age that is where it starts getting more difficult to take out wisdom teeth. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can a dental cleaning whiten teeth?

    Hello, hope you are well! A dental cleaning can whiten teeth in certain circumstances. In certain areas of your teeth stains collect, then they can be removed at the dental office giving a whiter appearance. However, if you do not have these stains, a cleaning will not change the whiteness of your teeth. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Are there any painful side effects after a teeth cleaning?

    Hello, Good to see you're getting a cleaning. The most common side effect (even though it does not happen to many people) is sensitivity after a cleaning. This may happen if it has been a long time since your last cleaning. Plaque gets hardened onto teeth without people knowing it. This can act as an insulation barrier and also irritate the gum tissues. Removal of it allows you to feel things normally (your teeth are not wearing sweaters to insulate the cold anymore). Maintaining the cleaning will allow this sensitivity to go away and the gums to heal. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How to lessen a child's fear of the dentist?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your child's fear of the dentist. The best way to approach a situation like this is to think about the experience your child has at the dentist from their point of view. Most children do not like something new so they view it as an annoyance at first. Then the child has several people sticking their fingers in his/her mouth (aka personal space). Another experience to consider is what your behavior is like. When children are in a strange environment they tend to refer to their parents for clues. If the parents are tense then they will be tense. Finally, look at the overall experience. If the child has to have a tooth removed on the first visit it is going to be very difficult to get that child to like going to the dentist; however, if they have many pleasant experiences then the child associates the dentist with a positive outcome. Hope this helps and good luck. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Do I need a root canal?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your tooth pain. It is possible you would need a root canal, but it depends on the type and source of the pain. This means that you would need to see someone for diagnostics. Best of luck to you! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Can very stained teeth be whitened?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your stained teeth. First thing to know is if the stains are surface stains or if they are intrinsic (or within the tooth). Surface stains can be removed (you would be surprised how much this can help in some cases). Then you can whiten your teeth. If the stain is intrinsic to the tooth then you there are different options depending on what the staining is. A lot of the results will at least lighten your teeth. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does dental bonding last on front teeth?

    Hello, Bonding have a range of time that they last. There are a variety of factors that play a role in the amount of time a bonding on your front tooth will last. Some of these factors include; teeth lining up edge to edge, how often you bite into things with your front teeth (apples, sandwiches) or tear things open with your teeth. All these things will greatly reduce the amount of time a bonding will last on a front tooth. The goal is to get a bonding to last for many years but due to a combination of factors that is not always the case. Best of luck to you, William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does bonding a tooth take?

    Hello, A single tooth bonding generally takes between 30 to 60 minutes depending on where it is in your mouth and how big it is. Hope everything goes well! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How can I fix receding gums naturally?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your receding gums. Natural remedies for receding gums would include making sure that your teeth are clean (this may mean starting with a dental cleaning, especially in the lower front). Brushing, flossing, mouth wash, soft tooth brush all help; however, the best treatment would be one that is catered to the underlying cause of the receding gums (this would require a diagnosis). Also, it is important to note that receding gums can only be stopped in its tracks. It cannot be reversed without gingival grafts. Hope this helps! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • When did Invisalign dentistry become popular?

    Hello, I believe Invisalign has been around since the late 90s. They started as a company that only worked with orthodontist (dentists that specialize in moving teeth). Like most companies these days they want to keep expanding until they can take over (like google or amazon). They then moved into working with general dentists provided they take an Invisalign certification course. This gained them a lot of popularity. I believe that more recently they started a program (that does not have all the bells and whistles) that works with general dentists that have not taken the certification course. This means that their name can now be used in every dental office. Hope this helps! William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Should I remove a gum cyst?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your gum cyst. First, it would be best to make sure that it is a cyst. Then it would be best to find out the location and local anatomy near the cyst. This way, you will know if it is affecting other structures like your teeth or jaw bone. Best of luck to you. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • What are the treatment options for a cracked tooth?

    Hello Sorry to hear about your son's tooth; unfortunately sometimes they crack without notice. It depends on how and where the tooth is cracked. Also, since your son is 12 it is most likely a permanent (adult) tooth although it could be a primary (baby) tooth. If it is a small crack, it might be able to put some bonding or a filling on it. If it is bigger it might need a crown, or if it is cracked in a bad location, it might be the end of that tooth. Good luck! READ MORE

  • What are the long-term affects of teeth grinding?

    Hello, I take it you have been told that your grind your teeth? Long term affects are that you wear down the enamel on the biting surface of your teeth and they become sensitive on you. Unfortunately at this point you would be doing damage control instead of preventative. Another rare but possible affect is that one or more of your teeth become loose in their socket. Hope this helps! READ MORE

  • How long is a root canal procedure?

    Hello, Root canals can be different lengths of time depending on which tooth it is, the reason you need the root canal, and whether you are seeing a specialist or not. That being said, most root canals are around an hour. Sometimes you have to go back for a second visit which is around 30 minutes. Good Luck! READ MORE

  • How long does a root canal take?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your root canal. Root canals can vary in length depending on whether you see a specialist or general dentist, and what tooth it is, and what was the condition that dictated a root canal needs to be done. That being said, most root canals take about an hour; and some require you to go back for another 30 minute visit. Good Luck! READ MORE

  • What is the best painkiller for nerve pain?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your tooth pain. Advil is the brand name for ibuprofen. As long as you do not have any allergies or interactions with advil it should be fine to take in the right dose. Feel better! READ MORE

  • Can a root canal damage nearby teeth?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your tooth. As my dad always said, "Anything is possible." However, barring any mishaps, it is unlikely that you will have damage to nearby teeth. Root canals are usually performed inside the tooth. William Scott READ MORE

  • Which straightens your teeth better?

    Hello, Congrats on deciding to have straighter teeth. Both invisalign and traditional braces have pros and cons to them, but in the end they will both do a pretty good job of straightening your teeth. The first thing you should answer to yourself is whether you are concerned with only your front teeth and whether you want your back teeth straightened or not. Also you should talk to whoever is providing the services, they may have preference based on the location of your teeth currently. If your preference does not match up with their preference then try a different dentist. Best of luck to you William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How long does a mouth ulcer take to heal?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your mouth ulcers. Are you sure they are ulcers? Something like a canker sore? An ulcer is an area where you are missing skin; in the mouth you are missing gum tissue. It does take some time for this gum tissue to grow back in from the edges of the ulcer. However, you should figure out the source of the ulcers to make sure it is benign. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How can I treat mouth ulcers?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your mouth ulcers. The first thing to do is make sure that any ulcer you have in your mouth is benign. If they are simple canker sores then and it has discomfort, then I like to try to keep it clean. This will help it heal faster. You can do this by using warm salt water rinses (there are ratios online) periodically throughout the day. Alternatively, you can use mouthwash, but this will sting while you do it, followed by some relief after your expectorate. Remember, the first thing to do is identify why you are getting ulcers. Best of luck to you. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • Is a dental cyst dangerous?

    Hello, Dental cysts come in a variety of types.They can be benign, but they can grow and cause issues with other things like teeth, gums, etc., because of their size. The first step is to make sure it is a cyst and benign, though. Good luck. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How effective is dental anesthesia for nervous patients?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your situation. Anesthesia comes in different forms (local anesthesia and general anesthesia). General anesthesia has different levels to it (sedation and conscious sedation). There is also nitrous oxide (which is for anxiety). Nitrous oxide can lower your anxiety but occasionally someone with anxiety can get anxious about the relaxing feeling. If this is what you are referring to as anesthesia, it depends on your level of anxiety. Perhaps you would prefer sedation or conscious sedation. This is something you can work out with your dentist. If not, you can try another dentist. Best of luck. William F. Scott IV, DMD READ MORE

  • How can I help my cracked tooth?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your tooth. If you are not having discomfort, then I would say enjoy the rest of your vacation and see a dentist when you get home. If you are having discomfort, that is a tougher question. Avoid using that side if you can, use pain medication appropriately, and you can try over the counter topical anesthetics. Of course this all varies depending on where you are vacationing. William Scott READ MORE

  • How long does it take to get your dentures replaced?

    While quality will not be the same, there are places that will do it in a day. Otherwise about 4-6 weeks with sending them back and forth to the lab. READ MORE

  • How do you fix spacing between teeth?

    Hello, Yes, spacing can be annoying! Depending on the amount and location of the spacing it can be fixed with an invisalign-like product, veneers, crowns, or a simple bonding. Your best bet is to get a couple dentists to evaluate you and give you opinions as each one of these options have pros and cons. READ MORE

  • Can wisdom tooth pain spread to other areas?

    Hello, Sorry about your discomfort. Unfortunately pain can radiate around your mouth. The nerves that go to your teeth converge before they get interpreted by your brain. It would be wise to get your wisdom teeth evaluated! Hope you feel better soon READ MORE

  • Is a spin brush better or a manual toothbrush?

    Hello, Most studies show that most powered tooth brushes are not more effective then a manual tooth brush. That being said, the only one that was more effective is one that rotates/oscillates. I believe the spin brush fits this description. However, the difference in effectiveness was also shown to be insignificant. Good luck with your tooth brush shopping! READ MORE

  • I have mouth sores after dental implant surgery?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your discomfort. Mouth sores can be caused by a variety of things. You should make an appointment to be evaluated by the dentist who put the implants in. READ MORE

  • What procedures require an oral surgery follow up?

    Different doctors will have different types of follow up appointments. The smaller more personal oral surgeons will have keep a closer watch on your procedure vs. the bigger chain oral surgeons. You will have less follow up appointments with the latter. Usually you go back 3-4 months later, but it depends on the type of implant procedure. READ MORE

  • Can flossing whiten your teeth?

    Flossing will generally clean between your teeth. It will only whiten your teeth if you have staining or debris between your teeth (which some people do get!). READ MORE

  • How can I quickly close the gaps in my teeth?

    It depends on a number of conditions of your mouth; but gaps can be close by invisalign and invisalign-like aligners in as little a couple of months. READ MORE

  • What does throbbing tooth pain mean?

    Unfortunately throbbing tooth pain can mean a variety of things. It could be irritated from trauma, the opposing tooth hitting it the wrong way, cavity reaching the nerve of the tooth, fractured filling, exposed root surface, etc. READ MORE

  • Can I still use mouthwash with a temporary crown?

    Your temporary crown can be held in with a variety of cements. However, you should be able to use mouthwash without any recourse. The goal is to avoid the crown coming out (your dentist would have to put it back in). You want to be careful when you floss as well. READ MORE

  • Can sinus infections cause tooth pain?

    Yes, sinus problems can cause pain in your upper teeth. The roots of your upper teeth are separated from some of your sinuses by only a thin membrane. READ MORE

  • Can I sleep in my dentures?

    Hello hope you are doing well, It is generally not advisable to sleep with your dentures in. You want to give your gum tissues some time to relax without your dentures in. Keeping them in all night allows bacterial and fungal growth on your gum tissues. The best way to clean them would be to soak them in one of the various cleaning solutions on the market. READ MORE

  • Why are my teeth decaying so fast?

    Hello, First you want to verify that those teeth actually have decay and that your other teeth do not have decay. Then you should consider a cavity assessment. You have teeth; therefore you have something to decay. You could have more virulent bacteria (more cavity causing bacteria). Then consider your oral hygiene habits and whether there is any more you can do (brush once more a day, floss, fluoride mouthwash). Finally consider your diet (sugary foods and drinks, acidic foods and drinks - gatorade and the like wind up having a pH similar to your stomach acid). It is also important to consider when you consume these products; after your brush your teeth, right before bed. How long do they sit on your teeth. READ MORE

  • How can I make my wisdom teeth heal faster?

    Unfortunately, there are no good ways to speed up the body's healing. The doctor should have given your some instructions on how to care for your extraction sites. Following those instructions should allow you to have the quickest healing time without complications. Also if you are diabetic make sure it is under control. Diabetics have slowed healing time. READ MORE

  • How can I recover after surgery to remove my wisdom teeth?

    Hello, The doctor should give you instructions on how to care for the extraction sites after your have your wisdom teeth removed. Comfort during healing also depends on which wisdom teeth your are having removed and why you are having them removed. Upper wisdom teeth have less trauma with removal so the healing process is easier. Impacted teeth need to be sectioned into pieces to remove them so there could be complications. READ MORE

  • Is it unusual for a crown to fall out?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your crown. It is not common for a crown to fall out; however, it is not unusual either. It is important to think about how long the crown has been in for. Some things that cause crowns to come out are poor retention, cement has been in there for a number of years, bite being off slightly (for a variety of reasons), or simply a bad batch of cement (remember cement is a product that dentist buy from manufacturers). READ MORE

  • Why does my daughter need a root canal?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your daugther's teeth. Yes, root canals are sometimes needed in a 14 year old. Most good dentist want to avoid it and don't like having to inform parents that this is the case. In any situation like this I always recommend getting a free second opinion. READ MORE

  • Why do my gums feel inflamed after a root canal?

    Hello, Sorry to hear about your discomfort. This is something you should go back to see your dentist (or another dentist about). Your gums feeling sore could be from something simple like the rubber dam they use to isolate your tooth, or a small micro fracture in your tooth (so small it cannot be seen). This is why you want someone to evaluate your tooth. READ MORE

Areas of expertise and specialization

Cosmetic DentistryInvisalignImplant Restoration

Faculty Titles & Positions

  • President Central Dental Society 2018 - Present

Awards

  • Champion of Action 2018 New Jersey Dental Association 
  • America's Top Dentist 2018 Consumer's Research 
  • Favorite Kid's Docs 2018 NJ Family Magazine 
  • America's Top Doc 2019 Find A Top Doc 
  • America's Best Dentist 2019 Consumer's Research 
  • Top Invisalign Dentist 2019 Invisalign 

Professional Memberships

  • NJDA  
  • Central Dental Society  

WIlliam F. Scott IV, DMD's Practice location

Deluxe Dental Group

161 Washington Valley Rd STE 202 -
Warren, New Jersey 07059
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New patients: 732-630-6672
https://www.warrensbestdentist.com

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138 ft
1 Robert Wood Johnson Pl, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA

ROBERT WOOD JOHNSON UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL SOMERSETl

110 REHILL AVE SOMERVILLE NJ 8876

161 Washington Valley Rd, Warren, NJ 07059, USA
Head southwest on Washington Valley Rd toward Mountain Blvd Ext
0.1 mi
Turn left to stay on Washington Valley Rd
0.6 mi
Turn left onto Morning Glory Rd
1.2 mi
Continue onto Mountain Ave
1.0 mi
Take the ramp onto US-22 W
1.3 mi
Continue straight to stay on US-22 W
0.2 mi
Continue straight to stay on US-22 W
1.3 mi
Take the Foothill Road exit toward Finderne Ave/Manville
253 ft
Continue onto Ronson Rd
312 ft
Turn right onto Foothill Rd
0.4 mi
Turn right onto Finderne Ave
0.4 mi
Turn right onto NJ-28 W/Union Ave
1.0 mi
Turn left onto Rehill Ave
0.2 mi
Turn left
184 ft
Turn right
62 ft
110 Rehill Ave, Somerville, NJ 08876, USA

SAINT PETER'S UNIVERSITY HOSPITALl

254 EASTON AVE NEW BRUNSWICK NJ 8901

161 Washington Valley Rd, Warren, NJ 07059, USA
Head southwest on Washington Valley Rd toward Mountain Blvd Ext
0.1 mi
Turn left to stay on Washington Valley Rd
0.6 mi
Turn left onto Morning Glory Rd
1.2 mi
Continue onto Mountain Ave
1.1 mi
Keep left to stay on Mountain Ave
0.2 mi
Turn left onto Shepherd Ave
0.5 mi
Turn right onto Hazelwood Ave
0.4 mi
Continue onto Raritan Ave
0.4 mi
Turn right onto Lincoln Blvd
367 ft
Turn left onto River Rd
1.8 mi
Continue straight to stay on River Rd
3.3 mi
Turn right onto Landing Ln
0.6 mi
Turn left onto Easton Ave
0.5 mi
254 Easton Ave, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA