Dr. Mark F. Pyfer M.D., Ophthalmologist
We verify the medical license of each FindaTopDoc Verified Doctor to ensure that their license is active and they are in good medical standing.

Dr. Mark F. Pyfer M.D.

Ophthalmologist

5/5(1)
500 York Rd Suite 102 Jenkintown PA, 19046
Rating

5/5

About

Dr. Mark Pyfer is an ophthalmologist practicing in Jenkintown, PA. Dr. Pyfer specializes in eye and vision care. As an ophthalmologist, Dr. Pyfer can practice medicine as well as surgery. Opthalmologists can perform surgeries because they have their medical degrees along with at least eight years of additional training. Dr. Pyfer can diagnose and treat diseases, perform eye operations and prescribe eye glasses and contacts. Ophthalmologists can also specialize even further in a specific area of eye care.

Education and Training

Univ of Pa Sch of Med, Philadelphia Pa 1995

Board Certification

OphthalmologyAmerican Board of OphthalmologyABO

Provider Details

MaleEnglish
Dr. Mark F. Pyfer M.D.
Dr. Mark F. Pyfer M.D.'s Expert Contributions
  • I had a scratch type eye injury?

    You need to see an ophthalmologist in the office within 24 hours. This is most likely a corneal abrasion. There could be a secondary infection that can cause permanent vision impairment. You will need medication to help the abrasion heal and reduce pain and inflammation, even if there is no infection. READ MORE

  • Right swollen eyelid?

    This is almost definitely a chalazion, or stye. It is an infected oil gland. READ MORE

  • I'm smelling smoke constantly?

    I recommend consulting an ENT physician about the smoke smell. Regarding intermittent mildly blurry vision in one eye, this may be dry eye, so I recommend trying artificial tear lubricating eye drops 3-4x per day. You should see an ophthalmologist or optometrist if the blurring persists. Hope this helps. READ MORE

  • Can you get an infection from wearing contacts?

    Yes, absolutely. Contact lens wear increases the risk of eye infections significantly. With proper lens hygiene though, you should be safe. Replace lenses as recommended, usually weekly or biweekly. Disinfect nightly and do not sleep in the lenses. Any pain or redness, remove lenses immediately and see your eye doctor. I hope this helps you. Sincerely, Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Swollen eyelid?

    That is in the area of the tear gland called the lacrimal gland, beneath the outer portion of the upper eyelid. You should see an ophthalmologist within a week for an examination. There are many causes ranging from a common blocked eyelid gland called a chalazion, to an abnormality of the lacrimal gland itself or adjacent structures. An exam is necessary as a first step. I hope this helps. Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Can you read and watch TV after cataract surgery?

    Yes, there are no visual restrictions during the healing period after cataract surgery. Your vision may be a bit blurred in that eye for a few days after surgery, and you may need new glasses for your clearest vision. Using eye drops is usually necessary for a few weeks after surgery to promote good healing, and it is best not to rub the eye or get water into it for the first week or two. As always, follow your individual surgeon’s instructions carefully, since not all cases are the same. I hope this helps. Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Signs of bulging eyes?

    No, your eye photos look normal. I am reasonably sure your question is motivated by advertising for Tepezza, a newly approved IV therapy for Graves Disease, which causes swelling behind the eyes in some patients. If you have any reason to be concerned about the appearance or comfort of your eyes, or are having vision problems, please consult an ophthalmologist for an in-person visit. Mark F. Pyfer, MD, MS, FACS READ MORE

  • How do you treat eye discharge in babies?

    This should be evaluated by an ophthalmologist as soon as possible. It could be an infection or congenital nasolacrimal duct obstruction. For infection antibiotics are prescribed, and for NLD obstruction, often warm compresses and massage along the lower lid adjacent to the nose in a downward direction can help to improve drainage. If this does not help, a short probing procedure is often necessary to clear the obstruction. Hope this helps, Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Lenses or glasses?

    As long as the contact lenses are fit by a qualified eye doctor and you follow the care directions carefully, then this should be a good option for you. If you do not like the hassle of contact lens wear, but still want to see without glasses, laser vision correction is also a good option with proper testing to make sure you are a good candidate. I hope this helps you. Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Eye color?

    No, the mild heat applied to the lids is not enough to cause any changes inside the eye. If it was too hot the eyelid skin would burn before anything happened inside the eye. Hope this helps, Mark F. Pyfer, MD, MS, FACS READ MORE

  • Sore on my face?

    It looks like an infection or inflammation of the skin in the corner of the eyelid, called angular blepharitis. Usually treated with an antibiotic-steroid combo ointment. However, it is hard to tell from a picture, especially since your eye is closed. Please see an ophthalmologist at your earliest convenience. Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Swelling on eyelids?

    This is a chalazion, often referred to as a stye. Try using warm compresses and gentle massage 3-4x/day. It should resolve without treatment. If it does not go away in 2-3 weeks, or if you have pain, redness, or change in vision, then see an ophthalmologist. Hope this helps you. Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Retinal detachment and flying?

    If you truly have a retinal detachment, this is an urgent condition that could get worse while you are traveling and lead to permanent vision loss. I advise you to see a retinal surgeon right away for another opinion. Most times surgery is required and would necessitate postponing your trip, even if your vision is not affected currently. Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • How long do I have to wear sunglasses after Lasik?

    Sunglasses after eye surgery like lasik are for protection and comfort outdoors. We recommend them for at least the first week after surgery. In fact, sunglasses in bright sunlight, especially on the beach, water or snow are always recommended to protect your eyes against UV radiation. It is always best to ask your lasik surgeon for their specific recommendations for you after surgery. Sincerely, Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Sty?

    A stye is a plugged oil gland on the eyelid, called a Meibomian gland. They can become infected, and if so, require antibiotic eye drops or pills or both to resolve. Most non-infected styes respond to conservative treatment with warm compresses and gentle massage 3-4x/day for a week or so. If any increase in swelling, pain, or redness, this indicates infection and you should be seen by an ophthalmologist within 24 hours. The lubricating ointment sold over the counter called Stye ointment is usually not helpful. Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Do you need surgery for a gray haze in your eye?

    Gray haze in vision or on the surface of the eye is not normal at your age. You should have a full eye exam preferably with an ophthalmologist to determine the cause. Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Can I get Lasik if I have astigmatism?

    Yes, almost always if the astigmatism is not too high. But it is important to have careful measurements of your corneal shape and a full eye exam to make sure you are a good candidate. And your prescription should be stable for the past year at least. Hope this helps! Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • What helps morning dry eyes?

    It is unusual to have dry eyes at your age unless you have a medical condition like Sjogrens disease or graft vs. host disease (GVHD) after chemotherapy. You could also have exposure at night if your eyelids open partly while you are sleeping. It could also be allergy or blepharitis. The best solution for you is to see an ophthalmologist soon, since treatment will be targeted to your specific issue. Hope this helps! Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Can a bacterial eye infection go away on its own?

    Yes, mild bacterial conjunctivitis can be cleared by the immune system without the use of antibiotics. However, there are potential complications of bacterial eye infections such as scarring of the cornea or penetration of bacteria inside the eye which could result in vision loss or be more difficult to treat at an advanced stage. It makes sense to treat with an antibiotic eye drop unless there are other factors such as pregnancy where you may want to avoid exposure to most drugs if possible. In that case, even over-the-counter lubricating eye drops contain a preservative called benzalkonium chloride (BAK) that can work like a disinfectant, but is not absorbed into the bloodstream. Also, specially formulated iodine (povidone iodine 5%) can be used as a disinfecting eye drop. It is best to consult your eye doctor to address your particular situation. Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

  • Does vision therapy work for a lazy eye?

    No. Amblyopia is the medical term for lazy eye, and it can only be effectively treated prior to age 10 or so, by partially occluding or blurring the vision in the good eye to restore neural connections to the “lazy” eye. Eyeglasses may also be needed at the same time. After age 10, there is limited plasticity remaining in the visual cortex. Mark F. Pyfer, MD READ MORE

Areas of expertise and specialization

Cataract SurgeryRefractive SurgeryGlaucoma

Professional Memberships

  • American Medical Association  
  • American Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgery  
  • American Academy of Ophthalmology  

Dr. Mark F. Pyfer M.D.'s Practice location

Northern Ophthalmic Associates

500 York Rd Suite 102 -
Jenkintown, PA 19046
Get Direction
New patients: 215-885-6830
www.northernophthalmic.com

Wills Eye Hospital

840 Walnut St 1240 -
Philadelphia, PA 19107
Get Direction
New patients: 215-885-6830

Northern Ophthalmic Associates

1330 Powell St 503 -
Norristown, PA 19401
Get Direction
New patients: 610-272-6888

Dr. Mark F. Pyfer M.D.'s reviews

(1)
Write Review

Patient Experience with Dr. Pyfer


5.0

Based on 1 reviews

Dr. Mark F. Pyfer M.D. has a rating of 5 out of 5 stars based on the reviews from 1 patient. FindaTopDoc has aggregated the experiences from real patients to help give you more insights and information on how to choose the best Ophthalmologist in your area. These reviews do not reflect a providers level of clinical care, but are a compilation of quality indicators such as bedside manner, wait time, staff friendliness, ease of appointment, and knowledge of conditions and treatments.

Recommended Articles

  • How is Conjunctivitis Contracted?

    Conjunctivitis is a very common and unpleasant condition, especially for people that use contact lenses. Children can be equally affected by this disease, as well as adults. People who have conjunctivitis, also known as pink eye, can transmit the disease to their family or friends or anyone else...

  • What Is Astigmatism?

    Normally, the eye, cornea, and lens can easily focus light rays on the retina. The disease known asastigmatism is an imperfection in the curvature of the cornea, and it can produce a clear, round dome covering the iris and pupil.The cornea and lens remain smooth and are always curved equally in all...

  • What Are Congenital Cataracts?

    Cataracts can be present at birth – which is termed as congenital, and in other cases can develop later in life. Various studies have shown an estimation that one out of every 250 children will develop a cataract either prior to birth or during childhood. While the exact cause is unknown,...

  • What are the Causes and Symptoms of Glaucoma?

    Glaucoma is a group of conditions that leads to the impairment of the optic nerve that carries information from the eyes to the brain. It is a progressive condition, which, if not treated, may lead to complete loss of vision. The most common cause of this damage is the increase in the pressure...

  • Reasons Why You Would Need a Cataract Surgery

    Unfortunately, no particular drug or types of eye drops have been found to specifically reverse or prevent the formation of cataracts. There are eyeglasses that can be recommended by your doctor if you develop nearsightedness or blurred vision as a result of cataract formation. A surgical procedure...

  • What Causes Albinism?

    What is albinism?Albinism is a group of genetic disorders that cause little or no production of the natural pigment called melanin. The color of your skin, hair, and eyes depend on the type and amount of melanin produced by your body. Most individuals with albinism have sun sensitivity, which makes...

Nearby Providers

Nearest Hospitals

ABINGTON MEMORIAL HOSPITALl

1200 OLD YORK ROAD ABINGTON PA 19001

Head north on Old York Road (PA 611) 1.6 mi
Make a U-turn onto Old York Road (PA 611) 767 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the right

HOLY REDEEMER HOSPITAL AND MEDICAL CENTERl

1648 HUNTINGDON PIKE MEADOWBROOK PA 19046

Head south on Old York Road (PA 611) 1121 ft
Turn left onto West Avenue 1054 ft
Turn right onto Newbold Road 181 ft
Turn left onto Washington Lane 5197 ft
Continue straight onto Susquehanna Rd 3740 ft
Turn left onto Meetinghouse Rd 3835 ft
Turn left onto Huntingdon Pike (PA 232) 2566 ft
Turn left onto Meadowbrook Drive 573 ft
Turn left 320 ft
Make a slight left 140 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the right

JEANES HOSPITALl

7600 CENTRAL AVENUE PHILADELPHIA PA 19111

Head south on Old York Road (PA 611) 4486 ft
Turn left onto Township Line Road (PA 73) 1.9 mi
Continue straight onto Cottman Avenue (PA 73) 2901 ft
Turn left onto Central Avenue 1673 ft
Turn left 210 ft
Turn right 504 ft
You have arrived at your destination, straight ahead

PENNSYLVANIA HOSPITALl

800 SPRUCE STREET PHILADELPHIA PA 19107

Head west on Walnut Street 423 ft
Turn left onto South Hutchinson Street 417 ft
Turn left onto Locust Street 623 ft
Turn right onto South 8th Street 456 ft
Turn right onto Spruce Street 193 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the left

THOMAS JEFFERSON UNIVERSITY HOSPITALl

111 SOUTH 11TH STREET PHILADELPHIA PA 19107

Head west on Walnut Street 1131 ft
Turn right onto South 11th Street 437 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the right

HAHNEMANN UNIVERSITY HOSPITALl

230 NORTH BROAD STREET PHILADELPHIA PA 19102

Head west on Walnut Street 236 ft
Turn right onto South 9th Street 1124 ft
Turn left onto Market Street 2147 ft
Go straight onto East Penn Square (PA 611) 504 ft
Continue straight onto John F. Kennedy Boulevard 323 ft
Keep right at the fork onto John F. Kennedy Boulevard (PA 3) 482 ft
Turn right onto North 16th Street 1645 ft
Turn right onto Vine Street 670 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the right

SUBURBAN COMMUNITY HOSPITALl

2701 DEKALB PIKE NORRISTOWN PA 19401

Head northeast on Powell Street 412 ft
Turn right onto East Fornance Street 678 ft
Turn left onto Dekalb Street (US 202) 3429 ft
Continue straight onto DeKalb Pike (US 202) 4585 ft
You have arrived at your destination, on the left

EINSTEIN MEDICAL CENTER MONTGOMERYl

559 WEST GERMANTOWN PIKE EAST NORRITON PA 19403

Head southwest on Powell Street 208 ft
Turn right onto West Wood Street 1177 ft
Turn right onto Markley Street (US 202) 3781 ft
Continue straight onto Swede Road 1.1 mi
Turn left onto West Germantown Pike 1.3 mi
You have arrived at your destination

VALLEY FORGE MEDICAL CENTER AND HOSPITALl

1033 W GERMANTOWN PIKE NORRISTOWN PA 19401

Head southwest on Powell Street 208 ft
Turn right onto West Wood Street 1177 ft
Turn right onto Markley Street (US 202) 3781 ft
Continue straight onto Swede Road 1.1 mi
Turn left onto West Germantown Pike 2.8 mi
You have arrived at your destination, on the right