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Dr. Henry Alexander Leder M.D., Ophthalmologist

Dr. Henry Alexander Leder M.D.

Ophthalmologist

(13)
1800 Orleans St Baltimore MD, 21287
Rating

4/5

About

Dr. Henry Leder is an ophthalmologist practicing in Baltimore, MD. Dr. Leder specializes in eye and vision care. As an ophthalmologist, Dr. Leder can practice medicine as well as surgery. Opthalmologists can perform surgeries because they have their medical degrees along with at least eight years of additional training. Dr. Leder can diagnose and treat diseases, perform eye operations and prescribe eye glasses and contacts. Ophthalmologists can also specialize even further in a specific area of eye care.

Board Certification

Ophthalmology American Board of Ophthalmology ABO

Provider Details

Male English

Residency

  • Louisiana State University
  • Louisiana State Univ Medical Ctr

Faculty Titles & Positions

  • Duke University - School of Medicine

Accepted Insurance

+ See all 2 Insurance

Dr. Henry Alexander Leder M.D.'s Practice location

Johns Hopkins Medicine

1800 Orleans St -
Baltimore, MD 21287
Get Direction
New patients: 410-955-7405, 410-955-7405

2 SHIRCLIFF WAY STE 715 -
JACKSONVILLE, FL 32204
Get Direction
New patients: 904-388-8446
Fax: 904-384-6261

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Dr. Henry Alexander Leder M.D.'s reviews

(13)
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Patient Experience with Dr. Leder


4.0

Based on 13 reviews

Dr. Henry Alexander Leder M.D. has a rating of 4 out of 5 stars based on the reviews from 13 patients. FindaTopDoc has aggregated the experiences from real patients to help give you more insights and information on how to choose the best Ophthalmologist in your area. These reviews do not reflect a providers level of clinical care, but are a compilation of quality indicators such as bedside manner, wait time, staff friendliness, ease of appointment, and knowledge of conditions and treatments.
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