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Dr. Stuart J. Brink

Endocronologist (Pediatric)

Dr. Stuart Brink is a pediatric endocrinologist and diabetologist practicing in Waltham, Massachusetts. He was the Joslin Clinic's first staff pediatrician and then opened up a private endocrine and diabetes practice, first in Chestnut Hill MA and subsequently in Waltham MA called NEDEC: New England Diabetes and Endocrinology Center. Dr. Brink specializes in growth, puberty, diabetes, pituitary, hypothalamic, thyroid, adrenal, testicular and ovarian problems as well as vitamin D deficiency, osteopenia and osteoporosis. He takes care of kids, adolescents, young adults and adults with these hormone problems with a special interest in diabetes, insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitoring, empowerment and motivational interviewing as well as associated endocrine issues with Down Syndrome, Klinefelter, Kallman, Turner, Noonan, Prader Willi Syndrome. He helped create and participated as a co-investigator in the DCCT. He also has participated in numerous growth hormone registries and evaluated idiopathic short stature as well as growth problems associated with small for gestational age babies/children. well. Pediatric endocrinologists possess copious knowledge on hormone chemicals and how they can affect other parts of the body and their functions. He lectures and writes nationally and internationally about these hormone conditions and has done so in more than 75 countries to date.
Dr. Stuart J. Brink
  • Waltham, MA
  • University of Southern California
  • Accepting new patients

Type 1 diabetes and general anethesia

You should review his diabetes needs directly with his diabetes team, either doctor or nurse. There are extra risks when those with type 1 diabetes require general anesthesia READ MORE
You should review his diabetes needs directly with his diabetes team,
either doctor or nurse. There are extra risks when those with type 1
diabetes require general anesthesia and a lot depends on his overall
diabetes care, A1c results as to whether these are high or low risks. More
frequent glucose monitoring, ketone testing all will help since the
surgical risks themselves as well as the anesthesia risks re all able to be
minimized by increased monitoring - much as would be expected during a sick
day. Often there is need for more insulin based on his usual treatment
regimen. Important to know that you can always call your diabetes team for
specific advice depending on such increased monitoring since they will have
the expertise to assist with changing insulin needs according to results
too. If the surgical and anesthesia people involved have questions, they
too can directly contact your diabetologists as well and should be
encouraged to do so if needed.