Chiropractor Questions Posture

How to fix bad posture?

My husband always complains that I have bad posture. I am usually hunched over but its just become an automatic habit. How do I force myself to sit up straight?

18 Answers

See a good Chiro along with changing sitting habits and do exercises
There are a lot of devices to help with posture correction. "Wall Angel" exercises are also a great to strengthen the muscles to fix bad posture.
Not surprisingly, good posture is a sign of a well-functioning brain, body and central nervous system. Posture is an unconscious result of a well-developed sense of proprioception, balance, coordination and muscle function. What exactly is proprioception? If you think about it right now, or even if you don’t consciously think about it, you know exactly where every part of your body is in space. You know if your knees are bent or straight and exactly by how much. You could close your eyes and touch your nose. You can do these things because your proprioceptive sense lets you know where every body part is in space. Balance is intimately linked to proprioception. It would be impossible to balance yourself (sit upright, stand upright, walk, etc.) without this ability. Proper posture requires these abilities. Just simply consciously focusing on your posture is unlikely to result in better posture, addressing the issue of poor proprioception is much more likely to generate positive results.

Taking all this into account, it stands to reason if good posture is a result of highly developed balance and proprioception, then these are good places to start.

Full Article: Not surprisingly, good posture is a sign of a well-functioning brain, body and central nervous system. Posture is an unconscious result of a well-developed sense of proprioception, balance, coordination and muscle function. What exactly is proprioception? If you think about it right now, or even if you don’t consciously think about it, you know exactly where every part of your body is in space. You know if your knees are bent or straight and exactly by how much. You could close your eyes and touch your nose. You can do these things because your proprioceptive sense lets you know where every body part is in space. Balance is intimately linked to proprioception. It would be impossible to balance yourself (sit upright, stand upright, walk, etc.) without this ability. Proper posture requires these abilities. Just simply consciously focusing on your posture is unlikely to result in better posture, addressing the issue of poor proprioception is much more likely to generate positive results.

Taking all this into account, it stands to reason if good posture is a result of highly developed balance and proprioception, then these are good places to start.

Full Article: www.familychiroplus.com/dont-just-practice-good-posture-improve-proprioception

Thanks,

Dr. Martin
Bad posture is usually indicative of a spinal condition such as scoliosis, misaligned vertebrae, leg length difference, poor attitude, lack of sleep, poor diet, lack of exercise and what you need is a chiropractor to realign and to teach and give you some information to prevent the above vices.
Bad posture becomes habit for a variety of reasons. First, thing would be to visit a chiropractor to determine if there is an anatomical reason, such as scoliosis, for your posture. Ask if one of several types of electro therapy and/or a posture support or brace is appropriate.
Chiropractic & Exercise with a postural brace could help you
Start with a thoracic posture brace. They sell it on amazon. It will help to start getting used to a new posture. The cells and muscles have memory and now those muscles need to be re-educated to the new posture. Also, upper body exercise will help to get the back stronger. Pushups will be helpful.
This is a common theme (forcing my bad posture to become good posture) based upon either a husband's or wife's or even your mother's suggestion. Unfortunately, the truth is that your underlying structure is abnormal and that is the exact reason you are not able to "force" and sustain good posture. The recommendation is to see a neuromusculoskeletal expert (a Chiropractic Physician) to evaluate your abnormal neuromusculoskeletal system so that he/she may assess if they may accept your case or if you may need a referral to a surgeon.
Treatment could help with muscle imbalance and increase your mobility to help with your poor posture, but long term, you need to create a good habit to sit up straight in order to have better posture. There are straps you could purchase which may help short term.
Unfortunately there is no quick fix for bad posture and you can't "force" yourself to sit up straight. Posture is the position that your body has come to think of as normal, so you naturally fall into that position. There are typically 4 components to poor posture. 1) Trigger points (knots) in the muscles. 2) Areas of reduced muscle flexibility. 3) Areas of altered joint mechanics and 4) Areas of weakness or instability. All 4 of these must be corrected in order to improve your posture. You essentially need to retrain your body what "normal" is supposed to look like. In our office, a course of care including chiropractic and physical therapy is typically necessary over a period of 8-12 weeks.
You can get a very simple posture correction brace for around $20. The work well to remind you to keep straight which will strengthen your upper back muscles too. Also you can do pectoral stretches. The back muscles over power the smaller upper back muscles and when you stretch them you will naturally straighten a little.

Thanks,
John C. Lemke DC ME
Hi,

This is a very common question I get regarding posture. The best solution I can offer is a postural restoration exercise called wall angels. You can look them up on YouTube and you will see how simple yet effective they are. They basically retrain your postural support muscles to help you upright yourself over time. Posture is lost over time and has to be retrained and regained over time. Do them consistently and you will see results.

Vishal K. Verma, DC, CCSP
Increase your awareness of your posture. Be mindful and always asking yourself, “Am I sitting, standing, etc., correctly?” Stretch the pectoral muscles, hip flexors, hamstrings, and quads. Also, seek the advice of a chiropractor who does hands-on adjusting or who practices the CBP chiropractic method.
Tough question not knowing anything about you. First of all, if you are older, you could have osteoporosis, compression fracture(s), etc. If you are healthy with no problems at all, sometimes just being aware you need to keep your shoulders back (which will strengthen some muscles near the shoulder blades) along with a simple lower thoracic exercise might help. But, again, it really depends on some of your personal factors. My advice would be to see either a physical therapist and/or a chiropractor (especially one with a rehab or sports medicine certification). 

Hope that helps,

Michael P. Simone, DC
There are several ways a chiropractor can help. Utilizing adjustments and simple posture exercises will work depending if there are any structural abnormalities. Visit your local chiro and see what may be done.
Bad posture does not happen over a weekend or days, but bad posture develops over years of not standing correctly or spinal misalignments that never got fixed. You need to start seeing a chiropractor on a regular basis.
Hello!

Postural problems may be as simple as a bad habit, but could also be from a structural problem. If a bad posture habit isn’t corrected, it can become a structural problem. It would be a really good idea to have a chiropractic check-up to see if you need structural correction. Gentle chiropractic adjustments can start you toward better posture and a happier husband!
At home, you can pay attention to your posture and sit up straight when you notice yourself slouching, stretch into a corner or doorframe, lay on a foam roller, etc. Unfortunately, there is no magic wand, and your participation will be critical to your posture success.

Best of health,

Dr. Steven Moon
You can't force yourself to change your posture; adjustments, traction, and exercise can!