expert type icon EXPERT

Sonia Regina Bordin Aykroyd

Dentist

<p><strong>Expert in Cosmetic Dentistry, Maxillofacial and Reconstructive Prosthetics, laser, dental education and presentation and dental materials and 3D imaging and printing</strong></p>
Sonia Regina Bordin Aykroyd
  • addison, TX - Texas
  • Master in Dental Sciences - Dentistry / London
  • Accepting new patients

My daughter still hasn't gotten her first tooth. Is this normal?

Hi, Regarding your daughter's teeth: When babies are born, they already have most of their teeth under their gums. The first tooth usually begins to erupt by the age of READ MORE
Hi,

Regarding your daughter's teeth:

When babies are born, they already have most of their teeth under their gums. The first tooth usually begins to erupt by the age of six months, although the exact age can vary from one baby to another. The first two teeth to come in are usually in the bottom middle, followed by the four in the upper middle. Most children have a complete set of 20 baby teeth by the time they turn 3.

Some children do not get their teeth at the same time as their peers. This can be caused by several factors. If a child does not have any teeth by the age of 18 months, he or she should be taken to a pediatric dentist for an evaluation. He will take an X-ray to see if there are any tooth buds formed.

Possible Causes of Delayed Tooth Eruption
In some cases, delayed tooth eruption is a trait that runs in the family and can be inherited from either parent. If you or your baby’s other parent got your first tooth later than average, there is a good chance that your baby will too. If you got your teeth late but there were no other associated medical or developmental issues, you probably don’t need to be concerned about your baby. He or she will most likely catch up with no problems.

In other cases, a delay in teething can be a symptom of other health problems. Babies who were born premature or had a low birth weight can get their teeth late and may also have enamel defects. Some genetic conditions, such as amelogenesis imperfecta and regional odontodysplasia, can cause teeth to erupt late and be poorly formed. Delayed tooth eruption can also be a symptom of malnutrition and a deficiency in vitamins or minerals, especially calcium and vitamin D. It could also be associated with Down’s syndrome or a hypoactive thyroid. Hypothyroidism can cause other symptoms, such as weakness, fatigue, headaches, and joint stiffness. The baby may experience delays in walking and talking and may be overweight.

Should You Be Concerned If Your Baby Starts Teething Late?
If your baby gets his or her teeth later than average but has no other medical concerns, you do not need to worry. He or she may need orthodontic work later, however. Baby teeth serve as a guide for permanent teeth. They also help babies chew and get the nutrition they need. Be sure to feed your baby soft foods with all the nutrients he or she needs to be healthy until it is possible to get proper nutrition from solid foods.

In many cases, a delay in teething is not something to be alarmed about, but you should take your child to a dentist if no teeth have emerged by the age of 18 months. The dentist can look for a possible medical cause and discuss your family history.

What causes bad breath in the morning?

Hi Bad breath is caused by the fermentation of organic food by the bacteria overnight. During the day, ou tong and saliva makes a mechanical cleaning of our mouth. At night, salivation READ MORE
Hi
Bad breath is caused by the fermentation of organic food by the bacteria overnight. During the day, ou tong and saliva makes a mechanical cleaning of our mouth. At night, salivation is dramatically reduced and the tong is not moving, so this cleaning does not take place, allowing for the bacterias to proliferate and "have a party"in our mouths. for that reason, the night oral hygiene is the most important one, with good brushing, flossing and mouthwash.

Ways to soothe teething?

Drooling, crankiness and tears can make teething an ordeal for babies and parents alike. Here's information to help ease the pain — for both of you. What's typical? Although timing READ MORE
Drooling, crankiness and tears can make teething an ordeal for babies and parents alike. Here's information to help ease the pain — for both of you.

What's typical?
Although timing varies widely, babies often begin teething by about age 6 months. The two bottom front teeth (lower central incisors) are usually the first to appear, followed by the two top front teeth (upper central incisors).

Classic signs and symptoms of teething include:

Drooling
Chewing on objects
Irritability or crankiness
Sore or tender gums
Low-grade rectal fever of 99 F (37.2 C)
Many parents suspect that teething causes higher fever and diarrhea, but researchers say they aren't indications of teething. If your baby has a rectal temperature of 100.4 F (38 C) or diarrhea, talk to your doctor.

What's the best way to soothe sore gums?
If your teething baby seems uncomfortable, consider these simple tips:

Rub your baby's gums. Use a clean finger or moistened gauze pad to rub your baby's gums. The pressure can ease your baby's discomfort.
Keep it cool. A cold washcloth, spoon or chilled teething ring can be soothing on a baby's gums. Don't give your baby a frozen teething ring, however.
Try hard foods. If your baby is eating solid foods, you might offer something edible for gnawing — such as a peeled and chilled cucumber or carrot. Keep a close eye on your baby, however. Any pieces that break off might pose a choking hazard.
Dry the drool. Excessive drooling is part of the teething process. Having a teething ring, fingers or other objects in the mouth produces saliva. To prevent skin irritation, keep a clean cloth handy to dry your baby's chin. Consider applying a moisturizer such as a water-based cream or lotion.
Try an over-the-counter remedy. If your baby is especially cranky, acetaminophen (Tylenol, others) or ibuprofen (Advil, Children's Motrin, others) might help.
Avoid homeopathic teething tablets and teething medications that contain the pain reliever benzocaine or lidocaine. They can be harmful — even fatal — to your baby.

Do I need to call the doctor?
Teething can usually be handled at home. Contact the doctor if your baby develops a fever, seems particularly uncomfortable, or has other signs or symptoms of illness that could be unrelated to the teething.

How do I care for my baby's new teeth?
Ideally, you've been running a clean, damp washcloth or a soft infant toothbrush over your baby's gums every day. If not, now's a great time to start. The cleansing can keep bacteria from building up in your baby's mouth.

When your baby's first teeth appear, use a small, soft-bristled toothbrush. Until your child learns to spit — at about age 3 — use a smear of fluoride toothpaste no bigger than the size of a grain of rice. Then switch to a pea-sized dollop as they approach 2 to 3 years of age.

It's also time to think about regular dental checkups. The American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry recommend scheduling a child's first dental visit after the first tooth erupts and no later than his or her first birthday.

Your baby's teeth and gums will also be examined at well-baby checkups. Remember, regular childhood dental care helps set the stage for a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums.