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Dr. S. Faye Snyder

Psychologist

Dr. S. Faye Snyder is a top Psychologist in Granada Hills, . With a passion for the field and an unwavering commitment to their specialty, Dr. S. Faye Snyder is an expert in changing the lives of their patients for the better. Through their designated cause and expertise in the field, Dr. S. Faye Snyder is a prime example of a true leader in healthcare. As a leader and expert in their field, Dr. S. Faye Snyder is passionate about enhancing patient quality of life. They embody the values of communication, safety, and trust when dealing directly with patients. In Granada Hills, California , Dr. S. Faye Snyder is a true asset to their field and dedicated to the profession of medicine.
Dr. S. Faye Snyder
  • Granada Hills, California
  • PsyD in Family Therapy at California Graduate Institute
  • Accepting new patients

Can one start showing symptoms of ADHD as an adult?

ADHD is distractibility. Anyone who is highly distracted will appear to have ADHD. One could even argue that children diagnosed with ADHD are highly distracted. This can be the READ MORE
ADHD is distractibility. Anyone who is highly distracted will appear to have ADHD. One could even argue that children diagnosed with ADHD are highly distracted. This can be the result of distracting childhood environments, secrets, forbidden opinions and feelings, overwhelm with too much to do coming from too many directions, etc. It is not genetic, in my opinion, but if you like the pharmaceutical solution, this diagnosis is for you.

What is masked depression?

It's acting fine to cover up suffering.

How is the recovery from depression?

Recovery from working with a psychiatrist is different than recovery working with a psychologist who specializes in depression. Psychiatrists, usually prescribe medication. READ MORE
Recovery from working with a psychiatrist is different than recovery working with a psychologist who specializes in depression. Psychiatrists, usually prescribe medication. Few don't. Few even spend time talking.
If you work with a good psychologist, you will work on your depression and its causes without medication (although some psychologists have begun getting certified to give medication too). I would pick only someone who specializes in depression.
If you were my patient, there would be a few things I would have to clear up. First, if you lost your true love, you should grieve. Maybe you should grieve for a year. If you want to cut it shorter, grieve more often. Cry and cry some more. Many of us have families who don't believe in crying as the way to heal. Many are in a hurry for the crying to end. Those messages can cause depression. If you are bottled up, taking the cap off will help you/her grieve.
If this is about not having said everything she needed to say, then she should think of ways to talk to him especially about all the things unsaid. Have another funeral, a private one, just her/you and him and cry some more. Then, go to a movie or a concert or volunteer for something.
If that doesn't help her get back into life, then she has "complicated bereavement", which usually is the result of unacknowledged disagreements OR early childhood abandonment issues. THEN, in my opinion, you go to therapy.

How can I get my son to not be scared of the dark?

Notice him in daylight. What is he timid about. Address those things. Talk to him about how when you understand something it takes away the mystery and fear. Anything we understand READ MORE
Notice him in daylight. What is he timid about. Address those things. Talk to him about how when you understand something it takes away the mystery and fear. Anything we understand we can handle. Tell him that the two of you will figure out what scares him, and that will help you figure out what scares him in the dark. There will be a correlation. Give him a nightlight in the meantime. (Sometimes, such fears are based upon hidden truths that the child can't tell, like his fear of going to daycare, or his fear of being with grandma or a stepdad.) Sometimes there's something legitimate behind the fear. He may be too young to be handed off, or maybe, if he was when he was a baby or toddler, he is afraid of being taken. Figure it out and talk about it. Help if you have help to offer.

Can counseling help my husband's behavior?

Yes. First, he should have a physical. Then, if he's clear, he should do therapy. He is angry about something he hasn't expressed in adult life or something that happened in his READ MORE
Yes. First, he should have a physical. Then, if he's clear, he should do therapy. He is angry about something he hasn't expressed in adult life or something that happened in his early childhood that is coming up, because he is safe now. If it's not physical, then it's buried hurt that wants out, in which case, the prescription may be to talk back, yell and/or rage a an empty chair about what is hurting him or to who hurt him. If that doesn't work, see a psychologist.

My wife is experiencing postpartum depression. How can I help her in the recovery process?

My experience is that most of the time postpartum is with women who were under nurtured in infancy. They don't recall it, but it left them without an instinct to nurture a baby. READ MORE
My experience is that most of the time postpartum is with women who were under nurtured in infancy. They don't recall it, but it left them without an instinct to nurture a baby. They want to nurture a baby, but there's something inside them that doesn't feel it and is saying, "What about me?" Usually, there is also an uncaring husband, who just wanted more children even knowing it would be too much for her. But, she is lucky. You care. You want to help. I would just sit and listen. If she doesn't talk, ask questions. Make sure the baby is not being neglected, because the baby will become another adult with a mysterious feeling of worthlessness.

My son has been diagnosed with autism and it is depressing my wife. Please help.

I have a controversial question to ask. Was she depressed before the diagnosis? Ask her. Sometimes Postpartum Depression is the best kept secret. Mothers put the baby in a room READ MORE
I have a controversial question to ask. Was she depressed before the diagnosis? Ask her. Sometimes Postpartum Depression is the best kept secret. Mothers put the baby in a room and close the door and watch tv until dad comes home and then hand him over to dad to take care of, "Here, I've been taking care of him all day. Please take over." Autism is usually reversible by age two, if you engage him, enjoy him, have fun with him, pet him, sooth him, make eye contact, etc. No abandonments. No daycare. Have fun, Hold him. Read stories to him. Cuddle him when he cries, because he MAY have a lot of heartbreak and rejection to release. Enjoy him. That may bring up the postpartum depression about how she was neglected as an infant, and she can excuse herself and cry and cry until she gets her heartbreak out. Then, go back and nurture the baby, and enjoy giving him what she never got and modeling for her parents what motherhood should look like. Help her out too. Take over and do the same. It's sweet revenge and so much fun, if you can get into the miracle.

My wife is a shopaholic. Is it a mental problem?

Is it a valid hobby, or is she breaking the bank? She might be a great professional shopper or buyer. She might be ignoring her child(ren) which would be serious and require family READ MORE
Is it a valid hobby, or is she breaking the bank? She might be a great professional shopper or buyer. She might be ignoring her child(ren) which would be serious and require family therapy. If she is ignoring you, pay attention to her. Take her to dinner and a movie. Date her. Court her. If she is breaking the bank, it's a problem. She knows it. She is filling up a hole from her childhood. She may have seen a lot of privilege and beautiful things that others had or been parented by lots of shiny things to assuage guilt for not being available. She feels deprived inside and enjoys getting things. Ask her if there is an end. Sometimes a person is just catching up and getting everything that is needed. If there is no end, ask her if she would go to a shopaholic's version of AA. Therapy might be a good idea. Find a specialist in addictions. Create a reasonable allowance and take the cards away.

I am always anxious and have been this way for the last 7 years. What can I do to get a break from this anxiety?

So, anxiety usually is caused by early childhood insecurity or separation anxiety. There is a feeling of insignificance, emptiness or something to fit your interpretation of neglect READ MORE
So, anxiety usually is caused by early childhood insecurity or separation anxiety. There is a feeling of insignificance, emptiness or something to fit your interpretation of neglect at an early age. Maybe you also buried a trauma that never got expressed. In any event, sometimes we nurture or need our parents after we are adults, because we were insufficiently nurtured. Then, when they die, we know we will never get that hole filled. You need to address your neglect as a child, perhaps in therapy, talking about it and crying it out. After that, you begin to nurture yourself and following you dreams.

Are panic attacks while taking anti depressants normal?

Anti-depressants are not reliable. They work for some and backfire on others. They are actually a chemical lobotomy that make hit the right spot or not. If you stop taking them READ MORE
Anti-depressants are not reliable. They work for some and backfire on others. They are actually a chemical lobotomy that make hit the right spot or not. If you stop taking them you can get to the heart of the matter. Usually people who are depressed were neglected at an early age and are forbidden to know it or say it. If you talk to your therapist about your early childhood, you will probably burn it up naturally.

Is forgetfulness a mental illness?

Forgetfulness, in my humble opinion, is the result of being a child who was under orders: Don't do this. Do this. Now do this. You have more to do. Do this. It is a child who has READ MORE
Forgetfulness, in my humble opinion, is the result of being a child who was under orders: Don't do this. Do this. Now do this. You have more to do. Do this. It is a child who has to obey and wire her actions to someone else orders. Or, it could be a childhood where there was simply no training in where to keep things. When that happens a person is not organized in their mind. They don't learn to focus on their own systems and create their own order and planning. If they get over extended, it is worse. Much worse. So, Rx: Don't get over extended. Cut down on responsibilities. Organize your life and your system. Make time to sit. The intrusive thoughts can come in then, and they are the thoughts that often want a solution. Sit, pay attention to your thoughts and know that they need to be addressed. The more current you get (caught up), the less you will forget.

psychosis and nitrous oxide

You didn't say what the hallucination was. I think it is related to an unprocessed memory. Can you find truth in the nightmarish hallucination? What have you refused to remember, READ MORE
You didn't say what the hallucination was. I think it is related to an unprocessed memory. Can you find truth in the nightmarish hallucination? What have you refused to remember, face, reveal? Buried trauma is relentless, when given the opportunity to express itself. Once we process it (allow memory and feelings), we are relieved.

Would I be able to cure my depression with just exercise?

I don't think so. You can get temporary relief. You need to get in touch with the cause of your depression. The most invisible causes are early childhood abandonment depression READ MORE
I don't think so. You can get temporary relief. You need to get in touch with the cause of your depression. The most invisible causes are early childhood abandonment depression or neglect, often not remembered or acknowledged. If you know the reason, you have a head start. You need to talk about the feelings and the messages your mind believes that come with them. These are lies we have learned to believe, that we have to dismantle, as well as to process the feelings from whence they came.

Do therapists lead therapy sessions or do I?

Therapists don't read minds. This may be an issue from infancy when your primary caregiver failed to read your mind. Not sure. But, you get the most from therapy by going in and READ MORE
Therapists don't read minds. This may be an issue from infancy when your primary caregiver failed to read your mind. Not sure. But, you get the most from therapy by going in and telling the therapist what is going on with you, and then you can get feedback and guidance. (Of course, this depends on the therapist. Some don't think symptoms are caused, but rather think they are inborn. That's a shame.)

Can depression medicines cause excessive sleeping?

Psychotropic medications always have side effects. Therapy is a better idea. But, if this is your avenue of treatment, then you need to get your meds adjusted.

How can I help my daughter recover from accident trauma?

Early attachment trauma makes later-in-life-trauma worse. In other words, if a child had insufficient attachment or broken attachments in the first three or four years of life, READ MORE
Early attachment trauma makes later-in-life-trauma worse. In other words, if a child had insufficient attachment or broken attachments in the first three or four years of life, then that grown child, next to a securely attached grown child, would have a harder time in the trenches in war or in rape. So, first question: Was she securely attached in early childhood. Second question: did she see a trauma therapist? You can't heal trauma just by talking about it. And, trauma victims don't like talking about it.

My father started hallucinating. What can we do to help?

He's 78 years old. Everything starts to go, sometimes in the wrong order that we would have it happen. Talk to him. Ask him what it's like to see dead relatives. Would he like READ MORE
He's 78 years old. Everything starts to go, sometimes in the wrong order that we would have it happen. Talk to him. Ask him what it's like to see dead relatives. Would he like to talk to them? Does he have unfinished business he'd like to express? The older we get, the weaker our mental facilities, the better our memories of the good old days. Maybe he'd like to talk about those times. Maybe about 15 minutes a day would be lovely.

Can weight loss become an obsession?

Find a therapist in your area that specializes in anorexia.

What are the best ways to overcome negative thoughts?

Negative thoughts are learned. They are usually lies we learned. They usually include a rule not to discuss them. If you can face them, understand their origins, find the lies READ MORE
Negative thoughts are learned. They are usually lies we learned. They usually include a rule not to discuss them. If you can face them, understand their origins, find the lies in them and discredit them by realizing they are wrong, you can heal yourself. If you believe they are true and ruminate over them, you are what I call, "loitering", and making yourself worse. You have to find the cruel message you have learned to believe and discredit it.