expert type icon EXPERT

Dr. Deborah Perlick, PH.D

Psychologist

Dr. Deborah Perlick is a psychologist practicing in Bronx, NY. Dr. Perlick specializes in the treatment of health mental problems, and helps people to cope with their mental illnesses. As a psychologist, Dr. Perlick evaluates and treats patients through a variety of methods, most typically being psychotherapy or talk therapy. Patients usually visit Dr. Perlick because they have been experiencing depression, anxiety, stress or anger for a significant period of time and are seeking help. Psychologists may perform a variety of exams and assessments to diagnose a mental condition.
Dr. Deborah Perlick, PH.D
  • Bronx, NY
  • Accepting new patients

My wife is experiencing postpartum depression. How can I help her in the recovery process?

Yes, you can help your wife, which will be helpful to you and your newborn as well. Post-partum depression, as you know, is not uncommon, and should not persist with good treatment. READ MORE
Yes, you can help your wife, which will be helpful to you and your newborn as well. Post-partum depression, as you know, is not uncommon, and should not persist with good treatment. Find out if your wife's therapist is agreeable to you coming to sessions with her. This is a family matter, and discussing your concerns for your wife, for yourself, and for your newborn (if your wife is unable to bond with him, which is sometimes the case), openly and non-judgmentally, would be helpful. If your wife's therapist is not open to this--or doesn't have experience with couples' or family treatment, ask for a referral. It would be helpful for you to ask both your wife and her therapist how you can help. Taking action this way will go a long way towards letting your wife know that you are in this together. Also, if she is seeing a nonmedical practitioner, she should be evaluated for medication by a psycho-pharmacologist to help her recover from this common episode. It should not be needed after she has recovered, but the appropriateness should be explored. Many family members hold back from candid communication with their loved ones for fear they will say the wrong thing and make things worse. The partner then may interpret this as not caring or rejections. Don't be afraid to talk to your wife. But plan out what you will say, you want to nonjudgmentally express your concerns and ask her how you can help. She may be too depressed to answer, but she will take in your caring overture. Make sure you are in a calm frame of mind before discussing. You can always role play what you would say with a friend. Finally, if you are concerned that your child may be negatively impacted, do not hesitate to see your paediatrician, or get additional help in the household in the short-run, while she is recovering.

My son has been diagnosed with autism and it is depressing my wife. Please help.

I would recommend you seek help from a family/couples' therapist. Also, there are many support groups for parents of children with autism. You should be able to google or find READ MORE
I would recommend you seek help from a family/couples' therapist. Also, there are many support groups for parents of children with autism. You should be able to google or find on National Institute of Mental Health website. You are not alone, and sharing experience with other couples with similar experience can be very helpful. Also, your wife should be evaluated for treatment for depression. She likely needs therapy and may need medication if the depression meets criteria for MDD or subsyndromal depression.

My wife is a shopaholic. Is it a mental problem?

Yes it is a problem both psychologically, and likely financially. There is no official diagnosis for shopaholicism, and there may be differing underlying causes. First, it could READ MORE
Yes it is a problem both psychologically, and likely financially. There is no official diagnosis for shopaholicism, and there may be differing underlying causes. First, it could be part of a manic or hypomanic episode, so this should be ruled out. Does she exhibit excesses in other areas, e.g., travel, pressured speech, elated mood? Alternatively, the behavior might fall into the obsessive-compulsive (OCD) anxiety disorder. Finally, if her only enjoyment is shopping, she is likely experiencing symptoms of depression. I highly recommend that you and your wife have a consultation with a marital or couples' therapist. Your wife may also benefit from medication, and I would raise this with the therapist, if he/she is a nonmedical practitioner, e.g., a psychologist or social worker.

My 17 Year Old Daughter Has Bulimia.

Consult your primary care physician or family doctor. She will not outgrow it without help. If your PCP feels that her condition is serious, I think you should enroll her in an READ MORE
Consult your primary care physician or family doctor. She will not outgrow it without help. If your PCP feels that her condition is serious, I think you should enroll her in an inpatient treatment program. She will be unhappy and angry, but there is no other way you can help her. Sometimes we have to make tough decisions about our loved ones. Good luck!

Sudden fear of driving. What should I do?

Consult a mental health practitioner. There may be a why you can uncover, but more importantly, biofeedback can help you get over this fear which is interfering with you life. READ MORE
Consult a mental health practitioner. There may be a why you can uncover, but more importantly, biofeedback can help you get over this fear which is interfering with you life. You may also want to see someone in "insight oriented therapy" to view this sudden onset in the context of your life. But use biofeedback to extinguish it first.

Will counseling help my son get over his stage fright?

Counseling might or might not be helpful. If your son is amenable, you might try it. However, if your son has no other mental health problems, then you might try reassuring him READ MORE
Counseling might or might not be helpful. If your son is amenable, you might try it. However, if your son has no other mental health problems, then you might try reassuring him that this is not an uncommon problem and is probably temporary. I notice you characterize this a s "huge problem" whereas some degree of stage fright is not uncommon and is not part of a serious psychiatric disorder, presuming it's an isolated problem. I would be loving and supportive and assure him this is something that comes and goes. I would try to alleviate any pressure on him to perform, which will only exacerbate the problem.

What are the symptoms of ADHD?

There could be a lot of reasons for the behavior you describe. I would go to the National Institute of Mental Health website or google ADHD, A professional evaluation with a mental READ MORE
There could be a lot of reasons for the behavior you describe. I would go to the National Institute of Mental Health website or google ADHD, A professional evaluation with a mental health provider is a good idea. There are many treatment approaches to ADHD if that is indeed what he has. But he should be professionally diagnosed to differentiate these symptoms from symptoms of another disorder.

Is there any medication to help my husband quit alcohol?

There are medications that help reduce alcohol cravings, but our husband would have to want to quit. Alcoholism is a disease which is very hard to treat. I would consult a psychiatrist READ MORE
There are medications that help reduce alcohol cravings, but our husband would have to want to quit. Alcoholism is a disease which is very hard to treat. I would consult a psychiatrist specializing in alcohol treatment, or to start with, a family or couples' therapist so the problem can be fully evaluated. The extent of the outbursts and the consequences need to be evaluated for safety reasons for both youand the children. If there has been even mild violence, don't wait--get help right away.

Is my husband's mental health responsible for his increased sexual drive?

Your husband's sexual behavior is undoubtedly linked to his mental health and/or medical problems. But it may also be linked to family or couples' dynamics. I would recommend a READ MORE
Your husband's sexual behavior is undoubtedly linked to his mental health and/or medical problems. But it may also be linked to family or couples' dynamics. I would recommend a thorough evaluation--perhaps a "second opinion" since he seems to be receiving treatment, for this problem, as well as a couples' and marital therapy evaluation for the two of you.

My son is having night terrors after a heart procedure he had. How can I help?

Yes taking him to a psychologist or psychiatrist would be a good start. Better yet, most major cities have sleep disorders specialty clinics, often affiliated with medical centers/schools. Heart READ MORE
Yes taking him to a psychologist or psychiatrist would be a good start. Better yet, most major cities have sleep disorders specialty clinics, often affiliated with medical centers/schools.
Heart catheterization at age 9 is surely a traumatic experience, and it would be important for a mental health professional to explore his understanding of the procedure and his prognosis. Does he fear death, for example? Was the procedure successful? What is his understanding?

How can I get over my fears of height?

I would recommend biofeedback

What could be the reason my mother is just not eating?

Definitely, she should be evaluated for depression by a psychiatrist

psychosis and nitrous oxide

Hi, I recommend that you ask a psychopharmacologist, psychiatrist, or nurse practitioner, i.e., people who dispense medications and are more aware of adverse reactions. However, READ MORE
Hi,

I recommend that you ask a psychopharmacologist, psychiatrist, or nurse practitioner, i.e., people who dispense medications and are more aware of adverse reactions.

However, I will offer some general input. First, the main and long-prevailing view of psychosis -- and manifestation of psychotic symptoms in particular, is the stress-vulnerability model. That you had a break at age 13-14 suggests you have an underlying probably genetic vulnerability to experience psychotic symptoms. The idea is that you may be doing relatively well, but if your nervous system is "stressed" which a substance such as nitrous oxide that alters one's mental state and perception of reality (i.e., such that pain is not experienced as pain), you are at higher risk for an adverse reaction in the form of psychotic symptoms.

I would be less concerned with the dental work (since nitrous oxide has a very short half-life, i.e., it only lasts a short time, than with your overall mental status and assessment of need for medication. You say you have not been able to get to a psychologist. Given your report of a break at age 13-14, all the data on early onset psychosis show that the prognosis is much, much better if you begin taking regular antipsychotic medication as soon as the symptoms manifest. So, I would very strongly encourage you to seek medication treatment as well as individual or group psychotherapy.